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Old 03-18-2011, 01:59 PM   #1
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Top plate for frame wall, quick ?


I am currently framing a wall in my basement and want to know if this method will be fine.

The wall that runs parallel to the floor joist ,or truss as I have, is about 12" away from the nearest truss. The bottom of the truss, where the ceiling will be, is about 10" below the sill plate. Basically there was really no good way to attach the top plate of my frame wall. I thought about attaching a 2x4 to the concrete wall but didn't really want to drill into the wall. My solution is since this is a non load bearing wall I am only trying to prevent lateral movement, i simply attached a scrap piece of 2x4 from the truss to the top plate. Its like blocking but it just goes from the truss to the stud wall, not from truss to truss with the plate connected in between. Laterally, the wall isnt going anywhere. Is there any drawback to this?
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Old 03-18-2011, 02:11 PM   #2
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Try doing one from both directions, thereby tying the wall to two trusses.
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Old 03-18-2011, 02:15 PM   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Willie T View Post
Try doing one from both directions, thereby tying the wall to two trusses.
There are no trusses on the other side, its right up against the XPS. And the sill is about 8" above the top plate.
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Old 03-18-2011, 02:28 PM   #4
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Here's a drawing for better clarification:

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Old 03-18-2011, 04:05 PM   #5
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From your drawing, I would let the top plate be 1 1/2" down from the truss.
If you sheetrock & trim, you'll have solid wood to nail to instead of just studs.

When the wall is up, make sure the ends are plumb before nailing a lot of scrap blocks to the truss. Not nailing to the foundation wall means there is nothing really to keep your wall from racking..... if you know what I'm talking about.
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Old 03-18-2011, 04:44 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tizzer View Post
From your drawing, I would let the top plate be 1 1/2" down from the truss.
If you sheetrock & trim, you'll have solid wood to nail to instead of just studs.

When the wall is up, make sure the ends are plumb before nailing a lot of scrap blocks to the truss. Not nailing to the foundation wall means there is nothing really to keep your wall from racking..... if you know what I'm talking about.
not sure I know what you mean by "racking"
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Old 03-18-2011, 05:29 PM   #7
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Facing your new wall from the front. Both ends need to be straight up/down...plumb.
In your example, if there were a floor truss above, you'd nail the bottom plate where ever it's supposed to be. Then plumb the corner before shooting a nail through the top plate into the floor truss.
Rack means your studs will look like this until the wall if plumb. ////////
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Old 03-18-2011, 09:33 PM   #8
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The floor truss blocking and the new drywall will give your wall lateral resistance. The wall will be tied to the ceiling from where a small bit of movement will originate due to flexing while walking above. I would use a "floating corner" at the drywall wall/ceiling joint; pp. 3; http://bestdrywall.com/files/ReduceCallbacks.pdf taken from; http://gypsum.org/pdf/GA-216-2010.html

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