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Old 06-12-2012, 08:57 PM   #16
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Originally Posted by mae-ling View Post
I do not join my drywall on studs, I join it between and use backer boards.
http://www.google.ca/search?sugexp=c...ll+butt+boards
Neat, I'm going to try this. I hate textured ceilings and the older I get the less patients I have with smoothing ceilings.
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As far as intersecting walls this is how I used to do it.

Now I use "ladders" for better insulation.

You can use a 2x6 and a 2x4 and make a L with them.
I noticed most sites on the web don't use stud blocks, they just use the 3 block U. I was taught to use stud blocks to reduce corner cracking. I forgot about ladder blocking. My parents house uses it.

For 2 x 6 exterior walls the simplest solution is a 2 x 6 rotated 90 degrees. Gives maximum insulation for the cavity.

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You can even forgo the wood and use Drywall Clips.
Never used them. I'll take a look.

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The reason your studs and joists don't line up is because it probably does not matter. With 16" on center spacing and double top plates there is no need to line up studs, Joists, and rafters.
Now with 24" on center spacing everything must line up. (Do a google search for Optimum Value Engineering, or framing 24inch on center)
I'll probably block under the window side studs to help with load distribution. Thanks
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Old 06-12-2012, 10:11 PM   #17
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Mae-ling's suggestion of forgoing any fastening at all in corners, instead using drywall clips is excellent.

It's more work, but it almost entirely eliminates the likelihood of corner cracking.
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Old 06-12-2012, 11:57 PM   #18
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Floating corners at walls/ceiling intersections (4.9) are listed by the drywall manufacturers. Free-floating (not attached to framing) butt-boards are not as all joints parallel with framing require framing (or r.c.'s, furring fastened directly to framing) below, (pp.3- 4.1.3----4.1.8) and minimum fire code in UBC and IRC: http://publicecodes.citation.com/ico...008_par003.htm

1x2 furring directly on framing; http://publicecodes.citation.com/ico...002_par007.htm

"all edges and ends": http://publicecodes.citation.com/ico...002_par010.htm

No fasteners required in top/bottom plates-wall install, single layer; non-fire rated app.: 4.8.2

Omit fasteners in underlying board only on wall inside corner: Fig.5 and 4.9.3 http://www.lafargenorthamerica.com/G...%20English.pdf

A free standing (attached to board only) butt-board will not hold-up in a fire (duration) the same as wood framing would. It's the fasteners that are of prime importance in a fire; pp41: http://www.fpl.fs.fed.us/documnts/pdf2003/crame03a.pdf
On a ceiling application (24"o.c.) with a 4x8 board, and two unsupported end joints, expect a 40% reduction in fastener strength, plus the weight of the backer boards helping the ceiling fall. Bummer if H.O. Insurance wouldn't honor that claim....

Gary
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17,000 dryer fires a year, when did you last clean the inside of the dryer near motor or the exhaust ducting?
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Old 06-13-2012, 12:44 AM   #19
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On a ceiling application (24"o.c.) with a 4x8 board, and two unsupported end joints, expect a 40% reduction in fastener strength, plus the weight of the backer boards helping the ceiling fall. Bummer if H.O. Insurance wouldn't honor that claim....

Gary
Last thing I want to do is burn to death on the crapper.

I did use fire resistent drywall on a friends kitchen. I figure every bit help and it doesn't cost that much more.

On the series side, thanks for the references.
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Old 06-13-2012, 02:01 AM   #20
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^Crazy talk unsupported end joints lol !

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Old 06-13-2012, 11:28 AM   #21
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Originally Posted by GBR in WA View Post

A free standing (attached to board only) butt-board will not hold-up in a fire (duration) the same as wood framing would. It's the fasteners that are of prime importance in a fire; pp41: http://www.fpl.fs.fed.us/documnts/pdf2003/crame03a.pdf
On a ceiling application (24"o.c.) with a 4x8 board, and two unsupported end joints, expect a 40% reduction in fastener strength, plus the weight of the backer boards helping the ceiling fall. Bummer if H.O. Insurance wouldn't honor that claim....

Gary
Ever hear of a ceiling falling because of Butt Boards?
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Old 06-13-2012, 12:55 PM   #22
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Common sense says to check with your local office on the use of butt boards where you live. But to think that a one pound butt board is going to cave in your ceiling is kind of humerous.
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Old 06-14-2012, 12:31 AM   #23
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That does sound silly--- stand alone. I have seen a lot of ceiling sags, even with proper spacing. Add insulation on top and it could get interesting real fast. 1/2" drywall is only rated by the manufacturer for 1.6# per square foot, about 12" of cellulose or R-49, which Zones 4-8 are required minimum per code. So now you are at maximum safe loading.... Keep in mind the butt joints are not fastened to the framing in my example above, that is, 40% of the fasteners are missing (or not attaching the board to the structural framing)... Drywall manufacturers require the recommended spacing of fasteners as stated (and codes echo it) because they tested their product- but go ahead and omit 40% anyway. As always, check locally. We can help you fix it.

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Old 06-14-2012, 01:17 AM   #24
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So really this hasd nothing to do with butt boards, and more to do with lack of fasteners.
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Old 06-14-2012, 11:44 PM   #25
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The butt boards are causing the lack of fasteners. 4x8 drywall secured to ceiling joists with 2 butt-boards leave 3 joists instead of 5 to hold the board up. Unless the butt boards are secured directly to the adjoining ceiling joist, they would be unattached to the ceiling structure. Say, 5 fasteners per joist, times 3 joists = 15 fasteners total, instead of 25. 5 more on each butt end (10 total), normally into framing, now into a non-supporting butt board. Or add framing to fasten the butt board to the ceiling structure, to regain the fastener numbers (40%), spread out over the board face- to regain the strength (40%), as per board manufacturers instructions and all I-series Building Codes.

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17,000 dryer fires a year, when did you last clean the inside of the dryer near motor or the exhaust ducting?
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Old 06-15-2012, 12:34 AM   #26
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You only "lose" the fastening of 1 joist not 2 as the sheet is just slide over 1/2 space. But because of the butt boards you actually tie it into the next 2 (one on each side) So really it should be stronger.
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Old 06-15-2012, 07:28 AM   #27
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You only "lose" the fastening of 1 joist not 2 as the sheet is just slide over 1/2 space. But because of the butt boards you actually tie it into the next 2 (one on each side) So really it should be stronger.
IF you use the longer butt boards. (the smartest way) Many people just use 48"... or cut them down to 46 or 47 inches.
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Old 06-15-2012, 07:34 AM   #28
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I would be interested in seeing a test on the continuing solidity of that 9" of butt board with 16 to 18 fasteners joining the two D/W boards together, compared to the breaking point of a single board suspended across the same span... or the point where weight defeats the effectiveness of the adjacent "field" fasteners.
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Old 06-15-2012, 01:26 PM   #29
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I was only thinking about the sheete on each end, but you are right with 54" butt boards they are also tied to the sheets beside.
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Old 06-15-2012, 02:07 PM   #30
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A very, very common case which happens all the time is where the two ends of abutting boards do not meet at the center of the adjoining stud or joist/truss. This often leaves almost NOTHING really holding the end of one of the boards... and the paper is usually torn and penetrated on that sheet. We all see it all the time.

Butt boards ALWAYS provide plenty of room to get in many very effective screws across those ends.
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