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Old 10-13-2010, 10:06 AM   #16
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The column strategy would work with 16" chimney block used as the backing/structure. The easiest approach would likely be:

A) Build out a wood framed "box" and use cultured stone or natural thin veneer stone.

B) Re-use your existing stone to build a 5-6" veneer to simulate a chimney.

C) Re-use your existing stone and lay them against a CMU (block) or wood backing, tied together with wall ties per code.


There's many, many details missing here, but A is by far the easiest approach, with C being the most time consuming IMO.

How about a picture of the whole thing from a little farther back?
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Old 10-13-2010, 10:10 AM   #17
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This is the best method of taking down the stack.
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Old 10-13-2010, 11:16 AM   #18
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jomama....here is the other pic. I also don't have much money that I want to spen so I would definitly want to reuse the stone I have in some way. I understand I will need to spend money but I would like to keep it to only necessary money..

Thanks again
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Last edited by organick; 10-13-2010 at 11:20 AM.
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Old 10-13-2010, 11:29 AM   #19
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Well, that is a horse of a different color after seeing that picture. I would be comfortable repairing that in place, subject to how it is attached to the house.
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Old 10-13-2010, 11:29 AM   #20
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Looking at the additional pics, I'd suggest going with option B. Than you merely need to patch in the soffit & fascia to match. Leaving the chimney project proud of the roof is not a good option.

This way you will have plenty of stone to select from. Don't expect this to be a weekend DIY project either, but if using limited nights/weekends while working a typical 40 hr. day job, more like a month plus.
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Old 10-13-2010, 12:29 PM   #21
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Quote:
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Well, that is a horse of a different color after seeing that picture. I would be comfortable repairing that in place, subject to how it is attached to the house.

Really??
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Old 10-13-2010, 12:31 PM   #22
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jomama45 View Post
Looking at the additional pics, I'd suggest going with option B. Than you merely need to patch in the soffit & fascia to match. Leaving the chimney project proud of the roof is not a good option.

This way you will have plenty of stone to select from. Don't expect this to be a weekend DIY project either, but if using limited nights/weekends while working a typical 40 hr. day job, more like a month plus.

Where can I get info on how to? Is it so time consuming because you have to build it in layers?? Just curious

Thanks
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Old 10-13-2010, 12:39 PM   #23
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Sure, 9' is a hell of a lot different than 15 or 20'. I would make sure it is attached to the house, open the top (actually, I would remove it to below fascia and repair that) to get a look inside, then begin grouting and tucking with an appropriate mortar. I would also place (in shallow 1-2' lifts) concrete in the interior.
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Old 10-13-2010, 01:30 PM   #24
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tscarborough View Post
Sure, 9' is a hell of a lot different than 15 or 20'. I would make sure it is attached to the house, open the top (actually, I would remove it to below fascia and repair that) to get a look inside, then begin grouting and tucking with an appropriate mortar. I would also place (in shallow 1-2' lifts) concrete in the interior.

Be honest, no YOU wouldn't. You'd start over from scratch with something completely unique if it was YOURS...............

I doubt there's much of anything at all still tieing that to the house. The second picture makes me aprehensive to just fill it with concrete. You've also got to find a good way to finish the top off, as a simple mortar wash will only create more problems when the center is filled solid.
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Old 10-13-2010, 02:27 PM   #25
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If it was mine I would rebuild it. I would also probably take it a bit higher and put a pot on top, as I don't really like the look of an external stack partially removed. There is quite a serious crack in it.
If I went down the pointing road I would probably use a pointing gun to get the mortar well into the wall.
If using a lime mortar I would go for a 3.5 hydraulic lime and sharp sand mix.
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Old 10-13-2010, 02:41 PM   #26
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I took these 2 pics through the hole in one side. Can sort of see the back on the inside.

As I said this has no real significance. I just don't want it to fall or cause me bigger problems. If i can fix so it will stay in place thats great. If I absolutely have to rebuild it I will. I definitely wont build it up above the roof. I just want it solid and safe.
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Old 10-13-2010, 04:21 PM   #27
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The problem with random stonework is that it does not have the stability of brickwork of the same thickness. My cottage is built from random stone and has stood up for hundreds of years, but the walls are 2 ft thick. Thinner random stone walls are much less stable. Most of the chimneys round here on stone houses are built from brickwork as they are too thin for random stone.
I think the safest way would be to follow jomama's advice for the rebuild.
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Old 10-13-2010, 09:46 PM   #28
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If it were on my house I would think about taking that structure down and siding it over. What is the attraction of a stone structure on the side of your house that was obviously once a chimney but has since been capped off with concrete at the fascia and no longer looks anything like a chimney. No offense but if it were a limb, it would be an amputated one and that concrete on top just looks like a stump.

Store the stones in a pile and and think of something else creative you can do with them like a small decorative wall or a http://www.diychatroom.com/f49/stone...firepit-71777/
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Old 10-13-2010, 11:30 PM   #29
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Jim, its not that I think anything is that great about it. It is just there already. Tearing it out and siding it would require buying siding when I already have stone. Although I do hear you on some level about it.
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Old 10-14-2010, 08:59 AM   #30
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Quote:
Originally Posted by organick View Post
Where can I get info on how to? Is it so time consuming because you have to build it in layers?? Just curious

Thanks

Stone work is just time consuming in general. Stone are very dense in nature, and don't "suck" the moisture out of the mortar very fast. Thus, you're limited on how much stone you can lay at one time before it becomes unstable. The fact that it's a small, tall area and the stone are round, and the time piles up quickly. Not saying you can't do it realistically, as it's a good DIY project if you have the time and patience. Good luck.
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