Sill Plate, Sole Plate, Bottom Plate -- Please "un"-confuse Me. - Building & Construction - Page 2 - DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum
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Old 11-04-2013, 09:55 PM   #16
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Confused. So you already have a wall there. You're replacing it with basically the same thing?
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Old 11-04-2013, 10:48 PM   #17
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A "wall", you could say that. Look at that hunk though, I don't know if you'd want to keep that in place, I sure as heck don't!

I had a very low-quality DIY'er in this house before me and I want to make it right.
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Old 11-04-2013, 10:49 PM   #18
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And you may need a "furnace room" to meet today's codes.

Slip some foam board under the plate (non-pt, check locally) with a continuous bead of caulking against the concrete floor for an air/thermal/capillary break to the cold slab/earth below to protect the studs/cavity insulation; http://www.greenbuildingadvisor.com/...-building-code

Egress; https://docs.google.com/viewer?a=v&q...33otStRi7Aff7g

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Old 11-05-2013, 08:23 AM   #19
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dave88LX View Post
A "wall", you could say that. Look at that hunk though, I don't know if you'd want to keep that in place, I sure as heck don't!

I had a very low-quality DIY'er in this house before me and I want to make it right.
OK. Well, the beam's surface looks to be in good enough shape where perhaps I would indeed just sand it and paint it the same color as the walls, on the beam underside and the side where it overhangs the 2x4 wall by 1/2" (3.5 studs + 1/2 drywall, against 3x1.5 beam). Now, the pictures do not show the column/beam connection. If that's unsightly, I would box the beam's underside and overhanging side and then build the wall up to the box.
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Old 11-05-2013, 08:35 AM   #20
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gary in WA View Post
Slip some foam board under the plate (non-pt, check locally) with a continuous bead of caulking against the concrete floor for an air/thermal/capillary break to the cold slab/earth below to protect the studs/cavity insulation;
Good call on the sealer under the plate. Embarrassed I forgot to mention that. Question, though. Isn't poly sill sealer good enough? Much easier to install--no cutting foam board into 3.5" or 5.5" wide strips, and it seems to be commonly used.

http://building.dow.com/na/en/applic...nsillplate.htm
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Old 11-05-2013, 10:00 AM   #21
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So the preferred method would be to use closed cell foam to provide the concrete plate barrier, and use standard lumber? The wicking up into the bottom of the studs is a great point I hadn't thought of.

Regarding the header, I would prefer to bring the drywall all the way up to the ceiling though.

I know my windows are ~34" x 34", I need to check how high they are off the ground. It's also a walk-out basement if that matters. My windows need to be replaced though down there (Well, in the whole house really but that's for a different year).
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Old 11-05-2013, 12:46 PM   #22
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Add shims/strapping to the beam (only top perimeter) only and use 2x6 studs/plates.

The slab is poured on earth, with a 2' exterior perimeter (if to code- here) wide layer of foam board. Older houses = no foam board or vapor barrier under concrete slab. So you have a drywall wood framed wall absorbing heat from the HVAC ---8' x 35'? standing on a colder slab; enter conduction. Your climate location is not very severe and the ground temps will be warmer - with 6' down = warmer yet; http://www.epa.gov/athens/learn2mode...enrys_map.html

Heat loss is worse close to the perimeter, lessening farther in room; http://www.google.com/url?sa=t&rct=j...hj_I6fU2ymaUSA

The R-value if the sill sealer is about R-1, compared to 1" of XPS (r-5) or PIC (R-6.5 and a vapor barrier (capillary break, to boot); add the wood plate (R-1.25 per inch = R-2-) so total of R-3 compared to R-7 with XPS. A lot less of the wall being a "heat sink", IMHO.

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Old 12-03-2013, 08:59 PM   #23
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Quote:
Originally Posted by joecaption View Post
The nails need to be ACQ when nailing into pressure treated wood.
If not they will shortly rust out.
I looked up the costs.
$50/2000 for the regular .131" x 3.5"
$80/2000 for galvanized .131" x 3.5"

Is there a cheap way around this versus buying both? Any way to get smaller quantities?

Can I:
A. Put down a PT plate attached to concrete, then bottom plate of wall attached to pt plate with galv (hand) nails, and air-nail the rest of the wall?
B. Use standard wood as the bottom plate on the concrete with the foam between the the bottom plate/concrete?

Last edited by Dave88LX; 12-03-2013 at 09:07 PM.
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Old 12-03-2013, 09:38 PM   #24
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dave88LX View Post
Can I:
A. Put down a PT plate attached to concrete, then bottom plate of wall attached to pt plate with galv (hand) nails, and air-nail the rest of the wall?
B. Use standard wood as the bottom plate on the concrete with the foam between the the bottom plate/concrete?
(a) Absolutely! I'm not sure why you think using a nail gun is important. You can frame an entire house with a hammer (though it might take you three times as long), and in fact, that's how it was done for hundreds of years.

(b) Absolutely! In fact, there was a thread recently where this was discussed. At least one well respected contributor to this chatroom believes foam and regular wood is preferable to using a PT sole plate, and his reasoning makes lots of sense to me.
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Old 12-03-2013, 09:55 PM   #25
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Awesome. I don't want to buy an $80 box of nails. I don't think it's important, it's just that I have one and I want to use it. :D

I pulled out the old door jambs today for the door between the upstairs and the basement. Drywall-2x4-misc wood jammed in there-drywall-wood paneling is how my wall is built. I'm just going to paint the paneling, extend the jamb, and call it good on this particular wall...

I'm not opening that can of worms. There is a drop ceiling attached to the wall and it will just be one problem leading to another into another.
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Old 12-04-2013, 08:30 AM   #26
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dave88LX View Post
Awesome. I don't want to buy an $80 box of nails.
Most places that rent nail guns also sell nails by the rack.
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