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Old 10-31-2009, 12:35 PM   #1
 
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Separation Wall


Hey. I want to put up a wall in my basement to separate an office space from the home theater.

How would I go about starting this? Any tips on soundproofing?
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Old 10-31-2009, 10:26 PM   #2
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Pictures would help


If the basement is already finished and all you need is a partition wall-

a standard 2x4 framed wall could be built,gunned to the floor and nailed to the floor joists above. Opening the drywall may be required to install blocking,if your wall runs parallel to the overhead floor joists.

For sound proofing the wall consider 2x6 top and bottom plates 2x4 studs
12 inch on center,staggered front and back--You will then weave unfaced insulation between the staggered studs.

5/8 drywall add a bit more sound deadening.--MIKE--

A good heavy door is a must.
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Old 11-12-2009, 05:05 PM   #3
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Keep in mind that sound will try and go up and over the wall, as well as around and under.

The staggered wall described bu oh'mike is fine. Keep in mind that the stud spacing can be 12", 16" or 24"

Insulation is better if installed vertically rather than horizontally woven. Weaving tends to compress the insulation, which allows for conduction of the sound vibration from one side to the next.
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Old 11-12-2009, 06:04 PM   #4
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All good points TED


Good -effective sound proofing is a skill and an art.

That's why there are Pro's to figure out the difficult and critical installations!
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Old 11-12-2009, 06:08 PM   #5
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http://www.certainteed.com/resources...%20Control.pdf

"Keep in mind that sound will try and go up and over the wall, as well as around and under." by Ted White --- exactly! Use sill sealer underneath and batts or foam board above, caulking all gaps.

"Opening the drywall may be required to install blocking,if your wall runs parallel to the overhead floor joists." by Mike. --- exactly! Don't shortcut and leave the existing ceiling in to transmit sound over the wall. Even drywall fasteners transmit so there is special glue instead. Weatherstrip the door and hang fabric on the theater side walls. Careful around the electrical boxes back to back, divide by 2 feet.
http://www.gp.com/BUILD/product.aspx?pid=1071
Be safe, Gary
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17,000 dryer fires a year, when did you last clean the inside of the dryer near motor or the exhaust ducting?
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Old 11-13-2009, 07:57 AM   #6
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If sound isolation is the goal, all foams would be avoided. The lower density fiberglass is much better.

Also no sill seal under bottom plate, if sound isolation is all that is being done. The light foam under a bottom plate is a flanking path. Just seal to floor with a good latex caulk.
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Old 11-13-2009, 11:35 AM   #7
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Boy, I'm glad you are here. How about this for above? http://www.buildinggreen.com/auth/ar...&printable=yes
The sill sealer was to prevent moisture in the slab from wicking to the wood bottom plate. Unless a finished floor. Thanks again, Ted.
Be safe, Gary
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Old 11-13-2009, 11:49 AM   #8
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Hi Gary,

I'm glad to be here too. Much great discussion, and I see you helping so many people here. I hope you get plenty of praise because you obviously have earned it.

Generally with treated lumber we don't see a lot of sill seal used. However, as I said, my thoughts are restricted to soundproofing. If there are other structural considerations, they may well trump certain isolation needs.

As far as mineral wool, great stuff. So is recycled polyester and cellulose. All are light and "open" enough to interract well with the sound waves. Whatever is cheaper or best fits your environmental position. In a sealed cavity, hard to beat the performance of lowly fiberglass.
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Old 11-13-2009, 11:59 AM   #9
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Sound mitigation can be tricky.

There is a real "weakest link" factor wrt sound. Bass frequencies are really difficult to stop. Most of the published literature includes stopping bass frequencies. If you don't have real bass (or if you can turn off the subwoofer ), you don't have to worry about stopping it, and it's a lot easier.

You can easily stop high frequency noise with mass. Put up two layers of 5/8 with minimal fasteners and glue and it will stop a lot of noise, except not so much for the bass. I put acoustic ceiling tiles in my wall cavities too, but that's mainly because I had them from taking them off the suspended ceiling. According to the literature they should help a lot too, especially again wrt to the higher pitched sounds -- probably do a lot more than fiberglass batts.

Sound will go under and around doors in their openings, and it will also travel through heat ducts. All that double-wall stuff is useless if the door is loose in the frame (or has a half inch gap under it!)
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Old 11-13-2009, 12:02 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pyper View Post
I put acoustic ceiling tiles in my wall cavities too,... probably do a lot more than fiberglass batts.

Not remotely the case. Tiles are designed to reduce reflections (echo) in the high frequencies. They are not at all what you want in wall or ceiling cavities.
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