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Old 11-09-2009, 08:31 AM   #16
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The addition of insulation, whether it's xps or fibreglass, doesn't alone affect the level of mould you may or may not have...are you saying you have mould? or are you just worried about its future growth.

If you already have visible mould, then lowering the relative humidty in that area will reduce it and you can do that by increasing the ventilation in the basement. Moulds love stagnant air...If you are worried about getting mould but there's no sign of any now, then the above still applies. But applying insulation layers just prevents your inside warm air from getting out and to the colder areas, say a concrete foundation wall, and must be a part of an entire overall approach.

Same for vapour retarders and vapour barriers; what you need in your situation could be quite different from your neighbours', although you are both in the same climate zone. It depends on the structure of your house and the basement walls. You can't take a piecemeal approach to conserving energy, in has to be looked at as an assembly of components and changing one has an effect on the others.

Neither xps nor fibreglass support mould growth; humidity and a source of food, do and if both of those are readily available, then mould will thrive anywhere. Mould often eat mildew too. But remove or lower the humidity level and the moisture, and the mould, go elsewhere.
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Old 11-09-2009, 09:46 AM   #17
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I'm in CT also. Not sure what you are attempting here. The board needs to be against the foundation wall. Then an air space. Then the stud wall. so wiring can be inside this air space. So foam or batts in the walls will work. Electrical will not come into play as an issue. But sealing the insulation in the stud wall is tough. If you go this way I use metal studs. Place one stud in place, then insert the ins. board, then the next stud against it. Much easier, much safer, straighter wall. A little better is better. Overkill will never yield a return on the cost.
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Old 11-09-2009, 12:10 PM   #18
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"Also what type of tape do I use to seal the seams where the boards meet?" ------ If the joints are too tight for foam, use cold-climate tape or foil tape: http://www.lowes.com/lowes/lkn?actio...96A&lpage=none http://www.lowes.com/lowes/lkn?actio...210&lpage=none
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Old 11-09-2009, 12:49 PM   #19
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Quote:
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I'm in CT also. Not sure what you are attempting here. The board needs to be against the foundation wall. Then an air space. Then the stud wall. so wiring can be inside this air space. So foam or batts in the walls will work. Electrical will not come into play as an issue. But sealing the insulation in the stud wall is tough. If you go this way I use metal studs. Place one stud in place, then insert the ins. board, then the next stud against it. Much easier, much safer, straighter wall. A little better is better. Overkill will never yield a return on the cost.
Bob, it makes sense, I was thinking the air space was the space between the studs in the wall. But now I see you mean a space between the stud wall and the foam boards.

Then the wiring will actually be behind the studded wall, not through the studs are in a traditional wall where the cavity is filled with batts.
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Old 11-09-2009, 01:39 PM   #20
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yes now you get it.
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Old 11-09-2009, 01:41 PM   #21
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yes now you get it.

Took awhile. Thanks, but one last (hopefully) question

How do you attach the wires to the back side of the studded wall?
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Old 11-09-2009, 02:03 PM   #22
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with staples? Normally I staple above or below the box and that is all. Technically the rest is fished in a void in the wall space and as such it does not need to be fastened.
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Old 11-09-2009, 05:08 PM   #23
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with staples? Normally I staple above or below the box and that is all. Technically the rest is fished in a void in the wall space and as such it does not need to be fastened.

Sorry, I know you stable above or below for code, what I meant and it wasnt clear, but you covered it, I didnt know if the wire needed to be fastened in the the air space. So you basically use the air space as the holes in the studs, into the box back out into the void then back into the box like a weave?
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Old 11-09-2009, 06:22 PM   #24
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You can attach the electric wire at the side of the stud towards the back
With an 8' wall by code you are supposed to have a staple in there
It would really suck to have an Inspector make an issue of that



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Old 11-09-2009, 06:49 PM   #25
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NEC 334.30 and 334.17 Type NM (nonmetallic) cable shall be secured at intervals not
exceeding 4.5 feet and within 12 inches of each box. When a single gang box 2-1/4” x 4”
or smaller is used without a cable clamp, the cable shall be secured within 8” measured
along the sheath.
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