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Old 11-24-2010, 11:25 AM   #1
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Older insulation


I am going to try my hand at drywalling two rooms I have been working on but was wondering about the insulation. I believe its from the 60/70's. I see nothing wrong with it other than its old. Would there be any need to replace it? Also is there anything else I would need to do/put on to the exterior walls before I put the drywall up? Thanks.



Last edited by wagonproject; 11-24-2010 at 11:28 AM.
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Old 11-24-2010, 01:02 PM   #2
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Hey Wagonproject,
From the looks of it your old insulation seems to be in good shape. I would just check the thickness of it and look underneath a couple of rows to make sure there is no hidden damage to the studs. Even though it is in good condition it wouldn’t be a bad idea to change all the insulation. Using new insulation will defiantly give you a higher r-value than what you currently have. It looks like you have done a lot of work and if I was in your situation I would just replace it while you can.
While the rooms are bare you should consider doing any electrical you might want now or in the future. You can run the wires for recessed lighting or ceiling fans pretty easily at this point. Have fun-Gregg

Last edited by gotogregg; 11-24-2010 at 01:07 PM.
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Old 11-24-2010, 11:27 PM   #3
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Location would dictate if more insulation is needed or not. Is there foam board on the exterior wall, outside under the siding?
Air seal the electrical holes in the bottom plate at the outlets to stop air movement from negating the existing insulation.
Upgrading the cavity insulation is more time and money. The existing may be R-9 or 11, to replace with the cheapest R-13 at the box stores would be a waste. You would still get convective loops due to the low density of the batts, unless you replaced with R-15. Depending on location, I would remove all, drywall and dense pack with cellulose after caulking all joints at studs, plates/sheathing using the ADA. http://www.buildingscience.com/docum...wall-approach/
If leaving as is, at least fill the electrical holes in the plate, use canned foam around the window and door frames, caulk the bottom plates to decking, and foam board and seal the rim joists. http://www.rd.com/57548/article57548.html
Possibly sill sealer strips on the stud faces for a thermal break, depending on location. F.b. the heat supply registers, no point in heating those stud cavities rather than the rooms.

Gary
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Old 11-25-2010, 09:09 AM   #4
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Nice clean work area.

If you're in a very cold climate, you might consider redoing it with open-cell spray foam. It's only slightly more expensive than batt, but the benefits are far greater. At least foam the gaps with a can of poly around doors and windows.
The downside with any drafts in insulation is that warm air movement carries water vapor, which condensates on the nearest cold surface(inside the walls).

+1 on getting the outlets/cables done first.

Since the 1st floor is already opened up, it probably wouldn't hurt to double up load-bearing studs at critical points(corners, doors) with the right screws. You could even go nuts and purlin in angled 1x6s to keep it all square.

Some sort of insulation, sound-deadner, or Quietrock drywall between the rooms might help when someone is sleeping and another is watching a loud movie.
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Old 11-25-2010, 08:30 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gotogregg View Post
Hey Wagonproject,
From the looks of it your old insulation seems to be in good shape. I would just check the thickness of it and look underneath a couple of rows to make sure there is no hidden damage to the studs. Even though it is in good condition it wouldn’t be a bad idea to change all the insulation. Using new insulation will defiantly give you a higher r-value than what you currently have. It looks like you have done a lot of work and if I was in your situation I would just replace it while you can.
While the rooms are bare you should consider doing any electrical you might want now or in the future. You can run the wires for recessed lighting or ceiling fans pretty easily at this point. Have fun-Gregg
Thanks for the reply. Yeah I am not sure what the R value of the existing stuff is. It is in great shape, but I am thinking since I got it stripped I might as well replace it with new. And yeah I did electrical work, added stuff for a fan in the one room along with the switches (bedroom) and ran a light to a new closet for the bedroom.

Quote:
Originally Posted by GBR in WA View Post
Location would dictate if more insulation is needed or not. Is there foam board on the exterior wall, outside under the siding?
Air seal the electrical holes in the bottom plate at the outlets to stop air movement from negating the existing insulation.
Upgrading the cavity insulation is more time and money. The existing may be R-9 or 11, to replace with the cheapest R-13 at the box stores would be a waste. You would still get convective loops due to the low density of the batts, unless you replaced with R-15. Depending on location, I would remove all, drywall and dense pack with cellulose after caulking all joints at studs, plates/sheathing using the ADA. http://www.buildingscience.com/docum...wall-approach/
If leaving as is, at least fill the electrical holes in the plate, use canned foam around the window and door frames, caulk the bottom plates to decking, and foam board and seal the rim joists. http://www.rd.com/57548/article57548.html
Possibly sill sealer strips on the stud faces for a thermal break, depending on location. F.b. the heat supply registers, no point in heating those stud cavities rather than the rooms.

Gary
Thanks for the reply. Yes I put foam board under the insulation when I redid the house 5 years ago. I am okay with removing it, I just want it to be beneficial like you said. I had talked to a buddy yesterday who was saying the same thing like you mentioned. Why I don't just have it sprayed? Would that be worth it? Just caulk everywhere I can and have it sprayed?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Stillwerkin View Post
Nice clean work area.

If you're in a very cold climate, you might consider redoing it with open-cell spray foam. It's only slightly more expensive than batt, but the benefits are far greater. At least foam the gaps with a can of poly around doors and windows.
The downside with any drafts in insulation is that warm air movement carries water vapor, which condensates on the nearest cold surface(inside the walls).

+1 on getting the outlets/cables done first.

Since the 1st floor is already opened up, it probably wouldn't hurt to double up load-bearing studs at critical points(corners, doors) with the right screws. You could even go nuts and purlin in angled 1x6s to keep it all square.

Some sort of insulation, sound-deadner, or Quietrock drywall between the rooms might help when someone is sleeping and another is watching a loud movie.
Thanks for the reply. Its in Michigan so its cold, or getting cold . So its would be worth it to have it sprayed? I may have to call a few places and see what they would charge. I put some bats up between the two rooms in the open wall you see.

Hopefully I can get some stuff accomplish this weekend home from college.
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Old 11-25-2010, 08:39 PM   #6
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Spray foam is convenient, but spendy, and (from what I read) it never really quits off-gassing, if that matters. If you replace the insul, look for something better than fiberglass, which is most anything else. And, like I believe was mentioned, AIR seal. j
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