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Old 12-24-2009, 05:16 PM   #1
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Which method ?


We are going to have a slab poured. There will be plastic laid and then some rigid foam board and then concrete. I might have missed a few details but the question is; should I lay down all the foam board and tape seams and let concrete contractor use boards to walk on while concrete is either wheelbarrowed in or pumped in OR should I let them lay the plastic and foamboard as they go ?
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Old 12-24-2009, 05:54 PM   #2
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The sub base is flat. The foam will not move or break from walking on it. I just finished a job like this on a 14,000 sq ft house. No way to lay as you go. the slap gets poured way to fast. And the rebar and/or wire mesh is above the foam also.
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Old 12-24-2009, 06:22 PM   #3
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As Bob said. The pink rigid foam has a compressive strength of 15# per sq. inch. Average worker's footprint (one foot) of 33#sq.in.=495# Not to worry... http://commercial.owenscorning.com/a...90a20857b2.pdf

Air seal: http://www.100khouse.com/2009/06/24/...b-air-sealing/
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Old 12-24-2009, 08:18 PM   #4
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Thanks for all the help and the links as well. I decided to use the blue 3/4" foam board. I have it ready to go and after I get it installed Ill be taping the seams with Gorilla Tape. I wasnt going to use any under slab insulation at all living here in TN but decided that at least the 3/4" should help break the cool ground temp and help retain the slab heat.
Thanks again.
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Old 12-24-2009, 09:11 PM   #5
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You really need a 24" perimeter rigid board, 2" thick, to do any good. Check with your local Building Department and County when you get a permit. That is, if it is a big enough building to require one.
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Old 12-25-2009, 07:21 AM   #6
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2" around the perimeter out 24" is all you need in your area. The 3/4" will not hold up to the weight of the workers and will do nothing for you. I use the 2" on the entire floor because I also always use radiant heat for concrete floors. A 6 mil vapor barrier is all you need under the concrete (over the sand or gravel base) for your job in TN. The earth below the slab toward the interior will not be cool.
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Old 12-25-2009, 12:34 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob Mariani View Post
The 3/4" will not hold up to the weight of the workers and will do nothing for you. The earth below the slab toward the interior will not be cool.
This is tempting indeed and music to my ears. I would love not having to lay all those boards down and tape them together. Its just not going to take a whole lot to talk me out of doing it because I cant see paying over 1200.00 for the 2" to lay down. The 3/4" that I currently have I bought from craigslist that an individual had left over from jobs. I can recoup my money from selling that if I need to.
Thanks for both comments.
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