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Old 03-03-2015, 06:43 PM   #1
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Load bearing post Removal


Hi,

I'm currently going though a remodeling of the kitchen and I'm looking to remove a load bearing post.

Structural blueprint of the original area. in the link bellow

https://drive.google.com/file/d/0Byp...ew?usp=sharing

First floor you see the expansion of the house in where a new floor was built. There is a double LVL in the middle sitting on the foundation walls and with a point load in the middle

On the second page it's the next floor up with a also a double LVL spanning 24 feet with also a load point post in the middle. Both sides of this LVL sit on 3 2by6 sitting directly on the LVL bellow.

Please note I have 2.5 inches on concrete poured on each floor for my in-floor heating. This structure is build to support 70 PSF.

Now my question is would adding one or 2 more LVL to the current one allow me to remove the load point post between the first and second floor?

PS: I know I need to reach out to a structural engineer but before I do I want to make sure I can do this by adding more LVL layers. If replacing this with a steal beam is the only option I'd rather keep the load point post.

So before I spend money on a Structural I'm looking for some answer like:

Should be fine with more LVL beam or not going to cut it. Need to go with steal beam.

If the general consensus is LVL should be fine I'll hire structural engineer if not then I'm not going to bother and will keep the load bearing post.

Thanks for all you feedback and advise

Last edited by Beaumeri; 03-03-2015 at 06:46 PM. Reason: typo
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Old 03-03-2015, 07:06 PM   #2
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Beaumeri View Post
Hi,

I'm currently going though a remodeling of the kitchen and I'm looking to remove a load bearing post.

Structural blueprint of the original area. in the link bellow

https://drive.google.com/file/d/0Byp...ew?usp=sharing

First floor you see the expansion of the house in where a new floor was built. There is a double LVL in the middle sitting on the foundation walls and with a point load in the middle

On the second page it's the next floor up with a also a double LVL spanning 24 feet with also a load point post in the middle. Both sides of this LVL sit on 3 2by6 sitting directly on the LVL bellow.

Please note I have 2.5 inches on concrete poured on each floor for my in-floor heating. This structure is build to support 70 PSF.

Now my question is would adding one or 2 more LVL to the current one allow me to remove the load point post between the first and second floor?

PS: I know I need to reach out to a structural engineer but before I do I want to make sure I can do this by adding more LVL layers. If replacing this with a steal beam is the only option I'd rather keep the load point post.

So before I spend money on a Structural I'm looking for some answer like:

Should be fine with more LVL beam or not going to cut it. Need to go with steal beam.

If the general consensus is LVL should be fine I'll hire structural engineer if not then I'm not going to bother and will keep the load bearing post.

Thanks for all you feedback and advise
Adding a new LVL in an existing structure is no small task. You're willing to go through all that for a post removal? Calculations would have to done by a structural engineer to get a better understanding of the loads involved in your case and whether adding one or more LVL's will suffice.

To answer your question, I don't see how it's not possible; in theory at least. Practicality/cost is a whole different story... Sistering just one extra LVL you basically half the load on the existing LVL. Would this reduction in load allow you to remove a load point post? couldn't answer that.

Last edited by seephor; 03-03-2015 at 07:12 PM.
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Old 03-03-2015, 07:10 PM   #3
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This is most likely my last house for a while. Labor for me is free so my cost is mainly Engineering ($1000), LVL plus some temp lumber to frame a temporary wall while I insert a new LVL.
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Old 03-03-2015, 08:11 PM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Beaumeri View Post
This is most likely my last house for a while. Labor for me is free so my cost is mainly Engineering ($1000), LVL plus some temp lumber to frame a temporary wall while I insert a new LVL.
Right. 24' span you're probably dealing with about 18 joists you have to temporarily support, cut, slip in LVL (have you thought about fitting the new LVL into the existing structure? That's sometimes easier said than done... You often times run into geometry issues...

You could do a rough estimate of the weight of the floor above. You know you have 2.5" of concrete, existing joists and subfloor will give you the dead load. You can then take that and estimate live load and you would get an idea of the current weight on the existing LVL. Look up the acceptable deflection of the size of LVL with no point load post and see what the deflection would be with that amount of load. If you see that it's well within tolerance, it'll at least give you a starting point knowing that for example the current LVL could support the existing floor with no point load so you would be confident in knowing that adding an additional LVL would be more than sufficient... That's how I would go about it...

Do you own estimates first then pay someone to reaffirm your findings. I never take advice from one supposed engineer. Some of the things I've seen in the field scare me to the bones.
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Old 03-03-2015, 08:48 PM   #5
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ask your eng about a possible ' flitch beam ' -https://www.google.com/search?q=flitch+beam&ie=utf-8&oe=utf-8 - we've had good luck
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Old 03-04-2015, 08:25 AM   #6
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The "concrete" for your radiant heating may be light weight. Probably. If the calculation is for do or die, I'd have the heat sink tested.
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Old 03-04-2015, 10:24 AM   #7
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The concrete is regular concrete. Not light weight. Original structure framed with this in mind

Last edited by Beaumeri; 03-04-2015 at 10:24 AM.
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Old 03-04-2015, 12:09 PM   #8
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You have a relatively complex structural situation. There is absolutely no way anyone on an internet chat forum can or should be attempting to answer whether or not you can add one or more LVL's to your house to allow you to remove a post. If you hire a structural engineer, they should evaluate a variety of options, come up with some rough costs, and recommend the best alternative to you. That is why you pay them.

You will always get some sort of "answer" when you pose a complicated structural question on a DIY forum, but what are you going to do with the (conflicting) answers you get? Your engineer should be licensed, they should carry professional liability insurance, and they should most importantly look at your house, evaluate options, and present to you a written report describing their findings, and the reason for their recommendations.
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Old 03-04-2015, 06:54 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Daniel Holzman View Post
You have a relatively complex structural situation. There is absolutely no way anyone on an internet chat forum can or should be attempting to answer whether or not you can add one or more LVL's to your house to allow you to remove a post. If you hire a structural engineer, they should evaluate a variety of options, come up with some rough costs, and recommend the best alternative to you. That is why you pay them.

You will always get some sort of "answer" when you pose a complicated structural question on a DIY forum, but what are you going to do with the (conflicting) answers you get? Your engineer should be licensed, they should carry professional liability insurance, and they should most importantly look at your house, evaluate options, and present to you a written report describing their findings, and the reason for their recommendations.
Daniel, Thanks for you feedback. It's actually my plan to check with a Structural engineer before performing any work.

My goal here was to hopefully get some general idea if adding a extra LVL should/could do the job. If the general consensus is that I need to replace the current beam double LVL with steel beam then I'll simply stick with the current point load post and wont spend the money for the engineer.

This was my sole and only goal here hoping some experimented folks would chime in..

Again thanks for your feedback.. I won't expect anything else from this post and will instead reach out to my local Engineer for guidance.
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