Insulation Under Floor - Building & Construction - DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum
Advertisement


Go Back   DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum > Home Improvement > Building & Construction

CLICK HERE AND JOIN OUR COMMUNITY TODAY...IT'S FREE!

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Display Modes
Old 12-19-2009, 11:41 AM   #1
Member
 
Join Date: May 2008
Posts: 99
Rewards Points: 75
Default

Insulation under floor


Hello. I have an insualtion question. I live in a house (Chicago) that has a crawl space and I recently poured 4 " of concrete to control moisture and to use for storage. I added insualtion on the walls, sealed up the vents and the HVAC has a vent down there so it maintans 60 degrees year round with humidity levels of 45%, so basically it is a 42" unfinished basement. The wooden floors aren't ice cold, but are a tad chilly. If I put insulation underneath the floors (ceiling above crawl space,) would I see a big difference or not in temperature upstairs? We keep the thermostat at 65-68 degrees during the winter.

Tim
timchi29 is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Old 12-19-2009, 12:29 PM   #2
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Posts: 951
Rewards Points: 500
Default


If it's 60F in the "basement" and 65F in the first floor, then I don't think insulation is going to make much difference. It definitely won't make hardly any difference in feeling "chilly." You feel chilly (or not) based on the temperature of the space, and your thermostat is keeping it at 65.

You could see a difference in how cold the basement is though, and how often the furnace runs.
pyper is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Old 12-19-2009, 01:09 PM   #3
Member
 
Join Date: May 2008
Posts: 99
Rewards Points: 75
Default


It's the floor that is chilly when you touch it.
timchi29 is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Old 12-19-2009, 01:51 PM   #4
Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Illinois
Posts: 206
Rewards Points: 150
Default


Have you sealed and insulated the crawlspace foundation walls and the rim joist pockets? If the rim joist pockets are not sealed and insulated, you may be getting cool air through there that will make the floors feel cooler.
TJ_in_IL is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-19-2009, 02:15 PM   #5
Too Short? Cut it Again!
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Posts: 9,634
Rewards Points: 2,000
Default


You could run some of the newer radiant heat options and then insulate the floor. Any insulation is going to help but I agree you need to decide how much you want to spend to correct a 5 degree temp difference.
user1007 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-19-2009, 11:42 PM   #6
Registered User
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Posts: 11,730
Rewards Points: 526
Default


Yes, the floors will feel warmer and: http://www.advancedenergy.org/buildi...l%20Spaces.pdf
Be safe, Gary
__________________
If any ads are present below my answer or words underlined/colored, I do not condone/support/use the product or services listed/linked to, they are there without my consent.
17,000 dryer fires a year, when did you last clean the inside of the dryer near motor or the exhaust ducting?
Gary in WA is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-21-2009, 12:11 PM   #7
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Posts: 951
Rewards Points: 500
Default


Quote:
Originally Posted by timchi29 View Post
It's the floor that is chilly when you touch it.
I bet a countertops feel chilly too. Your body temperature is 98F. Your floors are between 60F and 65F. Run a glass of water and let it warm up to room temperature (65F) and see if it doesn't feel chilly.
pyper is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-21-2009, 06:38 PM   #8
Member
 
Join Date: May 2008
Posts: 99
Rewards Points: 75
Default


Nope. Countertops are water is fine. Just the floor.
timchi29 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-21-2009, 07:46 PM   #9
Registered User
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Posts: 11,730
Rewards Points: 526
Default


I thought it interesting in that article:

"In Flagstaff, researchers monitored energy use
throughout a single heating season. While the homes
with insulated floors used 20 percent less natural gas
than the controls, those with insulated foundation walls
used 53 percent more.
This seemed counterintuitive; ducts are a notorious source of heat loss. With
all the Flagstaff homes’ ductwork in the crawl space, one would expect better
performance from the warmer, wall-insulated crawl spaces. But according to
Cyrus Dastur, the Advanced Energy building scientist who directed the research,
those homes’ lack of floor insulation let heat radiate from the first floor to the
crawl space,
robbing more heat from the house than was saved by keeping the
ductwork warm.
The research makes it evident that in cold climates, it’s better to insulate the floor
above the closed crawl space than to insulate the foundation walls." From: http://www.advancedenergy.org/buildi...l%20Spaces.pdf
Be safe, Gary
__________________
If any ads are present below my answer or words underlined/colored, I do not condone/support/use the product or services listed/linked to, they are there without my consent.
17,000 dryer fires a year, when did you last clean the inside of the dryer near motor or the exhaust ducting?
Gary in WA is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Seal Peel and Stick Tiles? Echo1 Flooring 21 06-22-2012 09:07 PM
How To Install Rigid Foam Insulation on Concrete earthad1 Building & Construction 9 10-26-2010 09:49 AM
Old old linoleum, can it take paint? molamola Painting 23 11-11-2008 06:32 PM




Top of Page | View New Posts