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Old 11-23-2010, 08:44 AM   #1
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Increasing the Height of the foundation in a room.


I am thinking about building up the slab in my dining room to level it with the kitchen in order to increase my kitchen space. The kitchen is 6" higher. The dining room is 12' x 16'. I am a little concerned about adding the additional weight of concrete to the current concrete slab. Is there a composite material similar to Schluter Systems that can be used to achieve this or should I not be concerned about adding the additional concrete? Thanks for any help. Scott
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Old 11-23-2010, 09:17 AM   #2
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Why not just build a conventional floor over the existing slab, with the joists sitting the slab, shimmed as necessary?
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Old 11-23-2010, 09:34 AM   #3
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Thanks


I guess my only concern is that I live in Florida with very high humidity and moisture but I know very little about construction and am just trying to get some ideas. Your suggestion is probably the easiest and most economical. Thank you
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Old 11-24-2010, 11:29 PM   #4
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Certainly the easiest thing to do is, 1/2" subfloor on 2x6 sleepers, but I have no idea if florida's climate would create any concerns. I'd call up the local bldg dpmt and tell them what you want to do, then ask them if there is anything to be concerned about. Maybe moisture buildup would require preserved wood. Maybe ventilation is required, or an access to the space. You could also take your ideas to a local home building store to get some opinions. Let us know what comes of it.
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Old 11-25-2010, 12:20 AM   #5
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consider using pressure treated where you contact the existing slab
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Old 11-25-2010, 06:26 AM   #6
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Thats alot of concrete , i doubt your existing footer could handle the extra wieght,id check with an engineer 1st .
You could use select treated 2x6 plus your subfloor sheathing in order to get your 6" but is that to a finsihed floor in your kitchen?Youll need to allow for a finished floor.Theres a couple of different options you could use.If the concrete option wont work id start with a lazer level and mark your finished grade along the perimeter walls less your sheathing and finish floor, to see how level you are in the room you wish to raise compaired to the kitchen floor.This will give you an idea of the lumber needed to do the job be it 2x6 ,2x4 etc...
As for moisture a good vapor barrier will be needed.
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Old 11-26-2010, 05:31 AM   #7
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did this once - p/t's sleepers & 3/4" t&g ply over the top,,, prefer licens'd pro's but i'd ask the bldg dept 'fore ever considering any of the guys wearing vests or aprons
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