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Old 02-24-2010, 10:12 AM   #1
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I am brand new here and I am about to finish my basement.


I've never done this before, but I have all the tools and a brain like a sponge. So tell me everything. Thanks


No I'm kidding. But I'm serious though. But not really.


No seriously, I am a newbie at this and my goal is to be like Yummy Mummy and finish my basement on my own. Hopefully in less than 3 years though. 3 months maybe?
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Old 02-24-2010, 11:00 AM   #2
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Hmm, is there an admin that can't move this thread to Building and Construction? I seemed to have mistakenly put it in the wrong place.
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Old 02-24-2010, 11:14 AM   #3
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Do you have a specific question ?



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Old 02-24-2010, 11:18 AM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Scuba_Dave View Post
Do you have a specific question ?

Actually I do, I get the general principle for framing with the 16 on center. How do I do the corners where the studs meet up? and where do I measure from for the first 16?

I photo would be nice for visual purposes.
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Old 02-25-2010, 02:10 PM   #5
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You might want to check into some books on residential construction and framing as well as about basement remodelling.These should answer most of your questions as well as raise some more. They will also help you plan your project including how to allow for plumbing, heating and electrical. Don't forget to get permits before you start!
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Old 02-25-2010, 05:37 PM   #6
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It's always wise to check your local codes for any odd little things that the local jurisdiction may have made to the national building code.

If you always conform to code nobody later on will have a complaint.--Mike--
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Old 02-26-2010, 06:49 AM   #7
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^ok thanks fellas. Definitely good advice.

I guess I will keep all my questions in this thread to keep the boards from being cluttered. Unless the admins rather have different questions have their own threads.


Another question: Why should I pull a permit to finish my basement? What will happen if I don't? The reason I can see is the city wants to know when my house is improved upon so that they may jack my property taxes up.
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Old 02-26-2010, 08:02 AM   #8
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For a major project like this you need to get permits so that :
a) You know that the work was done properly.
b) Work without a permit MIGHT compromise your home owner insurance.(or at least cause problems even if unrelated issues arise).
c) How do you justify an increase in property (insurance) value if the work never happened?
d) If you need to call a trade in they could refuse to work on your project.(or if they need a permit they'll be held up while you get yours).
e) When you re-sell, non-permitted work MIGHT need to be inspected and/or removed.
I'm sure others will come up with more reasons for permits on the big jobs.
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Old 02-26-2010, 08:27 AM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by daveb1 View Post
For a major project like this you need to get permits so that :
a) You know that the work was done properly.
b) Work without a permit MIGHT compromise your home owner insurance.(or at least cause problems even if unrelated issues arise).
c) How do you justify an increase in property (insurance) value if the work never happened?
d) If you need to call a trade in they could refuse to work on your project.(or if they need a permit they'll be held up while you get yours).
e) When you re-sell, non-permitted work MIGHT need to be inspected and/or removed.
I'm sure others will come up with more reasons for permits on the big jobs.
Ok those reasons are good enough for me. Especially since I didn't think about the home owners insurance part.
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Old 02-26-2010, 08:57 AM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LiquidSlap View Post
Actually I do, I get the general principle for framing with the 16 on center. How do I do the corners where the studs meet up? and where do I measure from for the first 16?

I photo would be nice for visual purposes.
In part, the reason for 16" o.c. is so that standard 4'x8' drywall can be applied such that two pieces can always butt against each other over a stud (notice how 48/16 = 3 with no remainder).

So coming out of a corner, you have to make sure the drywall on both walls has something to attach to in the corner. You have to also keep in mind that one piece of drywall will likely butt up against the other wall's studs, while the 2nd piece of drywall will butt up against the 1st sheet of drywall. So the thickness of drywall has to be accounted for as well.
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Old 02-26-2010, 09:00 AM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by daveb1 View Post
For a major project like this you need to get permits so that :
a) You know that the work was done properly.
b) Work without a permit MIGHT compromise your home owner insurance.(or at least cause problems even if unrelated issues arise).
c) How do you justify an increase in property (insurance) value if the work never happened?
d) If you need to call a trade in they could refuse to work on your project.(or if they need a permit they'll be held up while you get yours).
e) When you re-sell, non-permitted work MIGHT need to be inspected and/or removed.
I'm sure others will come up with more reasons for permits on the big jobs.
Or if you live in an area like mine, you seem to not need a permit for anything besides adding onto the house footprint....... which I find ridiculous...
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Old 02-26-2010, 09:23 AM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HooKooDooKu View Post
In part, the reason for 16" o.c. is so that standard 4'x8' drywall can be applied such that two pieces can always butt against each other over a stud (notice how 48/16 = 3 with no remainder).

So coming out of a corner, you have to make sure the drywall on both walls has something to attach to in the corner. You have to also keep in mind that one piece of drywall will likely butt up against the other wall's studs, while the 2nd piece of drywall will butt up against the 1st sheet of drywall. So the thickness of drywall has to be accounted for as well.
Ok so on the first wall with drywall going up, I should start measuring from the end of the stud rather than the center. No? and for the adjoining wall, I should measure from 5/8" (drywall thickness) in on the first stud because I have to account for the dry wall being there in the future.

It's logical in my head, but I could be totally wrong too.

Last edited by LiquidSlap; 02-26-2010 at 09:27 AM.
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Old 02-26-2010, 09:46 AM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LiquidSlap View Post
Ok so on the first wall going up, since the first stud will be against the wall, I should start measuring from the end of the stud rather than the center. No? and for the adjoining wall, I should measure from 5/8" (drywall thickness) in on the first stud because I have to account for the dry wall being there in the future.

It's logical in my head, but I could be totally wrong too.
Yes... and No... I think...

Let's avoid the gory details of what's going on in the corner and think about it this way:

Visualize two 4x8 sheets of drywall together such that the edge of one sheet butts up against the face of the other sheet, and the two sheets make a square corner. You are going to have to provide studs on the free ends of the drywall positioned such that the center of the stud is at the edge of the drywall. That way, the end of the drywall and the next sheet after it have something to attach to.
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Old 02-26-2010, 09:49 AM   #14
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One "gotcha" on 16" OC
Either the outside or the inside will be "perfect 16" OC...not both
Unless you have ~8" walls

You do need to take into accoutn the stud placement & where sheetrock will overlap at corners



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Old 02-26-2010, 10:41 AM   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Scuba_Dave View Post
One "gotcha" on 16" OC
Either the outside or the inside will be "perfect 16" OC...not both
Unless you have ~8" walls

You do need to take into accoutn the stud placement & where sheetrock will overlap at corners
ok take a look at the pic and tell me if I am correct.

http://tinypic.com/r/2hpiqzc/6

EDIT: wait, I forgot to account for the drywall. Ok move the left measurement down 5/8". That would be correct right?
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