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Old 09-05-2019, 05:43 AM   #16
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Re: How do I fix mortar that is cracked on basement walls


I used one of the hand operated mud hog pumps. It has a very good flow rate.
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Old 09-05-2019, 11:46 AM   #17
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Re: How do I fix mortar that is cracked on basement walls


An entire wall of CMU would not be filled with concrete. That would defeat the purpose of using CMU hollow core blocks to begin with. Rather the cores with vertical rebar, certain corners and around openings, and creating "piers" along a long wall would be grout filled as each course is laid up. That would be in concert with horizontal ties, bond beams, and connections to a floor or roof above.

It appears from your photos and descriptions the wall isn't showing problems that a solid fill would fix (if the cracks are from lateral pressure because no rebar then the new fill will just crack too). But if you want the difficulty of filling the entire wall now, that's your call, it shouldn't hurt as long as there are no blowouts or the pressure causes more joints to crack.

Relieving some of the hydrostatic pressure from the ground will counter not being built properly. IIRC past threads you said you installed a swale at the bottom of the hill. Your photo doesn't really show one. Dig a deeper one that carries some of the sheetflow coming down that hill to around the house, maybe even a french drain there.

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Originally Posted by fred93 View Post
If I fill in the area above the french drain with gravel, am I allowing MORE water to filter down to the french drain.
Good question, water seeks level, and I don't know how far away capillary action can pull water from, but I know typically there is a limit that a footing drain will pull water towards the gravel.

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Also, if dirt is placed on top of the gravel should there be a barrier between the two so the dirt doesn't migrate into the gravel?
You can top the gravel with dirt. The pipe should be socked or burrito wrapped with fabric, and also continue the fabric for the gravel all the way up the wall. Personally I would make a "number 6" with the fabric and the pipe also in a sock. Don't chintz with cheap landscape fabric and use solid pipe if it hasn't been mentioned yet.
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Old 09-05-2019, 09:30 PM   #18
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Re: How do I fix mortar that is cracked on basement walls


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Originally Posted by 3onthetree View Post
An entire wall of CMU would not be filled with concrete. That would defeat the purpose of using CMU hollow core blocks to begin with. Rather the cores with vertical rebar, certain corners and around openings, and creating "piers" along a long wall would be grout filled as each course is laid up. That would be in concert with horizontal ties, bond beams, and connections to a floor or roof above.

It appears from your photos and descriptions the wall isn't showing problems that a solid fill would fix (if the cracks are from lateral pressure because no rebar then the new fill will just crack too). But if you want the difficulty of filling the entire wall now, that's your call, it shouldn't hurt as long as there are no blowouts or the pressure causes more joints to crack.

Relieving some of the hydrostatic pressure from the ground will counter not being built properly. IIRC past threads you said you installed a swale at the bottom of the hill. Your photo doesn't really show one. Dig a deeper one that carries some of the sheetflow coming down that hill to around the house, maybe even a french drain there.


Good question, water seeks level, and I don't know how far away capillary action can pull water from, but I know typically there is a limit that a footing drain will pull water towards the gravel.


You can top the gravel with dirt. The pipe should be socked or burrito wrapped with fabric, and also continue the fabric for the gravel all the way up the wall. Personally I would make a "number 6" with the fabric and the pipe also in a sock. Don't chintz with cheap landscape fabric and use solid pipe if it hasn't been mentioned yet.
Thanks for your reply. The ditch/trough/trench that I dug was done years ago. I watched that area constantly whenever it rained and I never saw much water flowing down it so I never cleaned it out or pay much attention to it after awhile. With everything that I am doing at this point I will definitely dig it deeper and pay more attention to it from now on.

I have purchased a non-woven fabric to burrito wrap the pipe and gravel. I was thinking that I would only need to wrap the pipe & gravel a few feet up, but you are saying that I should wrap it all the way up?

I also plan on using a Bituthene membrane on the exterior walls, then cover that with a dimpled plastic membrane.

I know that several people have suggested solid pipe but I haven't made a decision on that yet.

I really think that installing the Bituthene and a dimpled plastic membrane would probably solve my problem. The french drain-gravel-new fabric etc is good insurance and I would be remiss not to add that extra insurance since the all the dirt has been removed anyway.

The original french drain was nothing more than a drain pipe with holes in it then they threw a piece of leftover floor linoleum over the pipe with NO gravel anywhere and the basement never had any water leaks. I have never seen any water in the basement only the stains as shown in my photos.
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Old 09-06-2019, 10:00 AM   #19
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Re: How do I fix mortar that is cracked on basement walls


wrapping the pipe' the same as putting the sock over it,,, better you should line the trench w/fabric,,, at least that will keep the drainage rock cleaner over the years + give you more cubic inches of clean drain & more filter fabric
place the bottom of the pipe at the same elevation as the foundation bottom,,, not below nor above,,, couple inches of rock for bedding, pipe, & fill trench w/'cover' rock then wrap fabric across top,,, this is how we do it but we only do this work for a living
bituthane's decent but, after cleaning the wall, we use hlm5000 trowel grade protected by waffleboard fabric (miradrain's 1 brand)
perforated s&d pvc pipe - never flexible,,, you're trading cents for dollars - BIG error im-n-s-h-fo
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Old 09-06-2019, 11:38 AM   #20
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Re: How do I fix mortar that is cracked on basement walls


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I was thinking that I would only need to wrap the pipe & gravel a few feet up, but you are saying that I should wrap it all the way up?
Yes, looking at the picture of your soil on the other thread, it has lots of fines (which turns to soup). Keep the gravel as clean as you can, which is why I would also use a sock over the pipe in addition to the fabric around all of the gravel. Also, you don't want the pipe installed even with the bottom of the footing, that could allow washout from under the footing. You can dig to even to the bottom, then your gravel bed sits the pipe a couple inches above the bottom of the footing.

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I know that several people have suggested solid pipe but I haven't made a decision on that yet.
It's a no brainer. Stay away from corrugated black pipe, leave it for the farm fields. Corrugated will leave water sitting in the "corrugations." The pipes can also crush or deform. They are usually installed a little wavy vertically which allows pooling of water. A tree root grows toward any consistent moisture and can destroy clay tiles, so corrugated plastic is a party for trees.

Use "sewer and drain" pipe, either the Poly (grey one) or PVC (white one). Both come in 10' lengths, have belled ends, accept standard PVC fittings, and cost about $10 per pipe. You can even slope them slightly to get the water away as quick as you can. I like to install the perforations at about 4:30/7:30 (on a clock face) so the solid bottom can wash away silt and rodding them later may be a bit easier.

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I have never seen any water in the basement only the stains as shown in my photos.
Quote:
Originally Posted by fred93 View Post
The french drain-gravel-new fabric etc is good insurance and I would be remiss not to add that extra insurance since the all the dirt has been removed anyway.
Just to be clear, the reason for the full height gravel and keeping it clean is two-fold: it drains the water quicker/doesn't absorb it and in performing that function it alleviates some of the hydrostatic pressure on the poorly-built CMU wall. Since you are digging it, do it right with the best know-how we have available now, and don't cut corners because you won't want to do it again. With a new system of gravel, drains, membrane, dimpled plastic, and swales, there will be redundancy and should have no trace of water or any CMU failure in the future.
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Old 09-09-2019, 06:54 AM   #21
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Re: How do I fix mortar that is cracked on basement walls


funnel & 5gal bucket, https://www.chemgrout.com/products/g...al-grout-pump/, OR https://www.kenrichproducts.com/,,, did you ever post where your WHERE's located ?
you can buy prepackaged 12,0o00# grout lots easier than mixing your own - L & M, 5 Star, even Home Depot now carries grout here in atl,,, grout columns should be steel reinforced im-n-s-h-fo,,, didn't i post a diagram ?

correction - normally hydrostatic comes UP thru the floor , not thru a wall
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