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Old 10-09-2010, 02:08 PM   #1
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horizontal 4" pipe passing thru cement slab


QUESTION: Is it possible to pour a durable and attractive sidewalk slab if there is a 4" pipe running through it horizontally (taking water from one side of the yard to the other)?

See pic below. My goal is take out the narrow "landing" at the base of these steps, run a pipe past the steps, and then repour the landing around the pipe. I want it to be durable, and to look like a sidewalk (no pipe showing thru). After getting by the steps, the pipe will do an S curve to end up at the lower end of my level in the pic below. There is only 5" elevation change between the tops of these two sidewalks. To avoid any low spots in the drain pipe, it would have to stay pretty close to the surface of the new pour. Can this be done with good results?

We considered a drain trough with a grate on top, but would prefer to keep the sidewalk look.




Thanks for ideas.
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Old 10-09-2010, 04:26 PM   #2
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It will be guaranteed to crack and probably settle on one side or the other.
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Old 10-10-2010, 08:08 PM   #3
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The previous poster is correct. You of course would want to put a control joint over the pipe and hope the crack will stay in the joint.

Does it have to be so close to the surface? An 1/8" per foot slope will drain fine, and you might be able to push that considering the usage.
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Old 10-11-2010, 07:24 AM   #4
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consider that pipe will be like a p-trap under your sink,,, use some 45s to ' duck ' under the s/w & rise up on the other side,,, you will need to clean out the sediment periodically, tho,,, make sure your inlet's higher than the st - we've done it many times for sump pump discharges but NEVER when temps regularly drop below freeze temps
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Old 10-11-2010, 08:12 AM   #5
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It gets cold here, so that's out, but thanks for the idea.
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Old 10-11-2010, 08:45 AM   #6
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Put the pipe under the walkway. If it's too low to drain in the area you want it to, dig a dry well.
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Old 10-11-2010, 09:20 AM   #7
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That's also a good idea, Ron, except the soils are poor-perking clay, and the idea is to reduce intermittent basement flooding. The water in this drain MUST drain to daylight or to the sanitation sewer system (which will be expense in permit fees, the city-required "expert" design, and so on. We do have a good place to drain to daylight, IF we can get past the steps.

Originally I tried to go through the steps, only to find out they are solid, not hollow.

How much material needs to cover the pipe to reduce chance of cracking? What sort of reinforcement should we add to the form? The slab itself is pitched steeper than the pipe needs to be, so on the high end it would be 3" below grade (and on the low end only 1"). Maybe we reduce the pipe to a 3incher and see how that does.
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Old 10-11-2010, 10:13 AM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by steveel View Post
How much material needs to cover the pipe to reduce chance of cracking? What sort of reinforcement should we add to the form? The slab itself is pitched steeper than the pipe needs to be, so on the high end it would be 3" below grade (and on the low end only 1"). Maybe we reduce the pipe to a 3incher and see how that does.

Do you mean 3" to 1" of concrete over, or 3-1" of gravel, plus 4" of concrete cover. If the latter, you should be OK from a structural standpoint. Freezing is another issue though.
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Old 10-11-2010, 02:57 PM   #9
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