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Old 01-28-2011, 11:55 AM   #16
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Hi Fixrite!
Thanks for your information. I'll definitely get to working on the garage seal. The GC is hopefully coming back out in the next few weeks to take a look at it and have one of his people re-align it. I think it's off a bit. Part of our issue too with the water in the garage is the driveway concrete 'raised' up during the winter so there is a lip so the water doesn't "roll" out of the garage. It sits at the lip that is by the door. Pretty annoying if you ask me. We'll see what kind of fix we have for that one! We have no other opening except a door into the house and the window is fixed so it doesn't open.

I really appreciate your info. We'll see what the next few weeks bring
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Old 01-28-2011, 12:05 PM   #17
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Alright, just a question, what happens to the water that forms from melting ice and snow off of the vehicles, if the door is completely sealed to the floor?

The answer --- at least what I have seen ---- the water will leak under the door seal until it freezes, generally freezing the seal with it. Next day you open the door, or try to, the openner will groan, and pop, the ice breaks (hopefully) and door goes up.

Lesson --- I made or left a couple of small openings to allow the melt water a way out, would have been nice to have a drain basin in the garage, but I don't think that is allowed by code.

Insulating a garage in my opinion is a mistake, that is if its for vehicle parking, what happens is the constant melting and freezing causes more problems, 1/ The vehicle experiences rust much sooner 2/ The frost in the unheated insulated garage in much worse causing ---- you guessed in damage to drywall.
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Old 01-28-2011, 12:08 PM   #18
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Quote:
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Hi Ron,
I've been trying to post some pictures but to no avail. I just tried to send a private message with a photo to you but I got a message that I haven't posted enough so I don't have enough privileges...ugh

The insulation in the garage is the two walls that touch the interior are spray foamed and the two "exterior" walls are R-19 as well as the ceiling. We did that ourselves. The ceiling is only 16 inches deep because it's a flat roof so basically TJIs. We've had some garage door issues with it not being tight up against the frame so they've come back some to fix that but not perfect yet. The frost, or should I say ice, that formed on the window at the bottom during our cold spells is like an inch thick.
There are picture posting instructions at the top of the Building & Construction forum.
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Old 01-28-2011, 12:10 PM   #19
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That's a good question. Right now our water just pools but I guess I was attributing that to the driveway lip. I wonder what happens for people have nice garage floors--here in Minnesota we can't have drains in the garage or else this would be a non-issue (the water pooling).

I understand what you're saying about insulation. I was hoping to keep the garage a little warmer for two reasons. One, I'm a house painter and my utility sink is out there and that's where I clean my brushes and equipment and secondly, I didn't want it so cold out there and for it to effect the warmth in our house. Probably naive of me, but just thought it would be better.

It's not balmy in there by any means--I've been meaning to put a thermometer in there so monitor the temps. Thanks for the insight tho
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Old 01-28-2011, 12:13 PM   #20
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Shoot! I found the instructions but it says the files are too large. I have to run out for an appointment but I'll try to post when I get back!
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Old 01-28-2011, 12:16 PM   #21
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Garage floor drains are allowed by code at least here in Canada. Some contractors actually slope the floor to the door which sounds like what has been done here. From what I understand the moisture is getting in from around the door, wind blown moisture. If that is taken care of via good seals it should take care of her wet drywall, which will need to be addressed or there will be problems down the road. The moisture on the floor brought in by the vehicle can be taken care of by installation of heater with a fan that has a temperature setting so it is not on when not needed.
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Old 01-28-2011, 12:18 PM   #22
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That's a good question. Right now our water just pools but I guess I was attributing that to the driveway lip. I wonder what happens for people have nice garage floors--here in Minnesota we can't have drains in the garage or else this would be a non-issue (the water pooling).

I understand what you're saying about insulation. I was hoping to keep the garage a little warmer for two reasons. One, I'm a house painter and my utility sink is out there and that's where I clean my brushes and equipment and secondly, I didn't want it so cold out there and for it to effect the warmth in our house. Probably naive of me, but just thought it would be better.

It's not balmy in there by any means--I've been meaning to put a thermometer in there so monitor the temps. Thanks for the insight tho
What are you using to heat the garage?
Propane heaters produce moisture as a by product of combustion.
Ron
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Old 01-28-2011, 12:19 PM   #23
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One quick post and then I gotta split for a few hours--no heat source in the garage and only one opening, the garage door. One service door that leads into the house and one fixed window 2 ft x 8 ft. I'm hoping when I get back I can get the pictures online.

Thanks guys!
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