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Old 10-17-2010, 01:56 PM   #16
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I am not familiar with galvanised re-bar, but have used epoxy coated bar. You will need the treat cut ends.
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Old 10-17-2010, 05:26 PM   #17
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Epoxy coated rebar and galvanized rebar are available, typically used on bridge decks where salt is used to keep the road clear. Not likely to find it at the big box store, you would need a specialty shop.

As for placing rebar correctly, it is surprisingly difficult to get the rebar to stay put when placing concrete. Since you have so little room for error, you should look into chairs to hold up the rebar (buy them along with the bars). Mesh is typically dragged into position by contractors, which explains why most of the time the mesh ends up out of position by up to an inch, or sometimes ends up at the very bottom of the slab, where of course it is useless.

You might want to consider fiber reinforced concrete, you can get it with steel or polymer fibers, it increases the tensile strength of the concrete, and is claimed to minimize cracking. Often used in lieu of rebar, or when ductile concrete is required.
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Old 10-18-2010, 10:03 PM   #18
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Originally Posted by Daniel Holzman View Post
The only downside to using rebar is that it rusts and expands if it gets wet.
So if you can properly place the rebar with adequate cover, it does no harm, only costs money and time. If you fail to place the bar with adequate cover, there is the potential for rusting and cracking down the road.

Daniel, you should know after all these years that it takes more than water or moisture to corrode steel embedded in concrete...............

Your theiry is debunked nearly everytime I tear-out old concrete and witness with my own eyes that the steel is in better shape 30-50 years later than the steel I can purchase today. There are a number of factors as to why, but it's obvious that steel doesn't commonly corrode away to nothing in the typical resdential application.


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Originally Posted by Daniel Holzman View Post
Epoxy coated rebar and galvanized rebar are available, typically used on bridge decks where salt is used to keep the road clear. Not likely to find it at the big box store, you would need a specialty shop.

As for placing rebar correctly, it is surprisingly difficult to get the rebar to stay put when placing concrete. Since you have so little room for error, you should look into chairs to hold up the rebar (buy them along with the bars). Mesh is typically dragged into position by contractors, which explains why most of the time the mesh ends up out of position by up to an inch, or sometimes ends up at the very bottom of the slab, where of course it is useless.

You might want to consider fiber reinforced concrete, you can get it with steel or polymer fibers, it increases the tensile strength of the concrete, and is claimed to minimize cracking. Often used in lieu of rebar, or when ductile concrete is required.

So what's your remedy for placement of mesh? I admit that I always get a kick out of an engineer who can't understand why what they've drawn on paper doesn't work out in reality..................
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Old 10-18-2010, 11:12 PM   #19
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1 of the 1st DOT pe's i met had a saying - in theory, there's no difference between theory & practice,,, in practice, there is he started working his college summers for lane out of ct.

nevertheless, we don't use steel in sidewalks or driveways UNLESS spec'd by the ( ? ),,, in private work, i'll use it IF the thickness's more 4" AND there's a good reason for it,,, epoxy coated bar's especially good for bridges AND SO IS SALT,,, otherwise bridge people get less repair work

mesh placement's easy when you've got a paving train,,, any other time its a major pita to get it where its supposed to be placed AND make sure it stays there when the conc jabonies tramp thru the mud
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