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Old 11-17-2014, 12:42 PM   #1
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Fastening 2nd Floor Bottom Plate


I have a weird "reverse balcony" that I'm enclosing. It basically looks like a 2nd floor room without the exterior wall-- and I'm adding that now. There are regular rooms on both sides and a beam carrying the roof load at the exterior.

My question: The new, non-load bearing wall is not above the load bearing wall of the first floor. None of them are on this wall, actually. What's the best way to fasten the new bottom plate? Technically I am in a high wind zone, but the rest of the house was built in 1910 so I don't see the need to hire an engineer to do it right if the rest of the house isn't. But I would to do the right thing while it's all open. This is permitted and they're being loose with the requirements (for the same reasons as me, I assume).

Pic below for an overview. I've changed the design since my mock-up so the new wall will actually be an 18" bump out from the existing wall and the current beam is staying in place (height loss isn't an issue since that bump-out area will be a built-in desk).

Thanks,
Matt

Fastening 2nd Floor Bottom Plate-1.jpg
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Old 11-17-2014, 01:58 PM   #2
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Since it is non load bearing any method you like should be fine. I would be simply nailing down to the flooring. If you can manage it drive nails in the floor joist below.
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Old 11-17-2014, 02:55 PM   #3
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Are you removing any of the interior walls?
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Old 11-17-2014, 02:57 PM   #4
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I'd be far more concerned with having left that bump out in place instead of having the roof meet up to the wall.
Looks like a sure way to have wall damage and water getting in under the bottom plate.
Any sheathing or siding should have been at least 6" above any solid surface.
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Old 11-17-2014, 02:59 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mikegp View Post
Are you removing any of the interior walls?
No, just removing the existing siding and replacing with drywall.
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Old 11-17-2014, 03:13 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by joecaption View Post
I'd be far more concerned with having left that bump out in place instead of having the roof meet up to the wall.
Looks like a sure way to have wall damage and water getting in under the bottom plate.
Any sheathing or siding should have been at least 6" above any solid surface.
Yes, that's a concern. When I had the shingles replaced a few years ago, they also redid the current balcony with 60 mil TPO. I have since discussed this project with them, and they said they can add a new layer of TPO and run it vertically. There is a TPO "weld" on the current balcony and it's incredibly strong. I'm planning to use HardiePlank siding and Miratec trim which should address rot issues from splash and wind-driven rain.

The alternative would be to remove the mini/false balcony that remains and run the roof right up to the house in a similar manner as the existing. That would obviously be better since it eliminates the flat roof section, but we ultimately decided to go the other way since we like the look of a little balcony.

Do the TPO and trim selections make you feel better about the design or would you recommend eliminating the flat roof section?
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Old 11-19-2014, 01:40 AM   #7
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Don't know, can't see it..?
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Old 11-19-2014, 02:06 AM   #8
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Might work if you keep the siding at least 2" up off the roof and added a gutter over that whole side of the house.
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Old 09-15-2015, 11:33 PM   #9
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Following up on this. I talked to an engineer and he said that since it was an infill wall I didn't need to worry about uplift (since, theoretically, the roof is already secured using the existing walls-- of course in this case it isn't....) so all I needed to do was resist lateral loads. He said it would be fine to fasten the bottom plate to the subfloor (joists where possible) with 2x 16d nails @ 16" OC. He advised using 2x H2.5 diagonally to join top plate and rafters.

As far as waterproofing, the roofers did come back out and attached a new piece of TPO to the existing and ran it up about 18" up the wall sheathing. I used zip panels for sheathing, so I ran zip tape across the top of the TPO.

Final photo of the project attached. Rest of the house still looks rough, but I'm in the middle of a major renovation now, and part of that will include removing the replacing the existing siding (and adding insulation and sheathing).
Attached Thumbnails
Fastening 2nd Floor Bottom Plate-2015-03-30-11.45.58.jpg  

Last edited by gatorheel; 09-15-2015 at 11:41 PM.
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Old 09-16-2015, 07:32 PM   #10
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Like it! Looks great! Ron
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