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Old 09-03-2015, 12:22 AM   #1
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Drywall and Trim issue, need help please


I'm working on a older home and I'm going to replace the drywall and trim/casing in a hallway. The problem I'm having is someone added drywall and trim at a later date and did an amateur job. The baseboards and door casing are almost flush with the dry wall and looks tacky. (This is an older home and most likely had wall paper originally.) My question is, what is the best way to add new trim and have it sit on top of drywall like its suppose to, rather than flush with it. Now if I add 1/2" drywall, and place trim on top of it that will fix it, but would leave raw drywall edge around door frame how do you guys usually address this? Thanks
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Old 09-03-2015, 03:16 AM   #2
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Remove the door casing.Add the new drywall and then attach some jam extensions to the jambs to bring them out flush with the face of the new drywall.
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Old 09-03-2015, 06:09 AM   #3
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Me, I would probably "lose it" and rip it all out. Hack work gets my fire boiling.

I can see waves in the photo and I'd bet it's like that throughout.
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Old 09-03-2015, 12:49 PM   #4
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Me, I would probably "lose it" and rip it all out. Hack work gets my fire boiling.

I can see waves in the photo and I'd bet it's like that throughout.
Yes I'm going to rip all drywall and trim out in the hallway and go back with all new. The trim doesn't even match the trim in the rest of the house, so i'll have to duplicate it. Actually the rest of the house still has original trim and looks good.
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Old 09-03-2015, 01:01 PM   #5
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Post some pics of your progress. Would love to see the results.
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Old 09-03-2015, 01:04 PM   #6
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I'm working on a older home and I'm going to replace the drywall and trim/casing in a hallway. The problem I'm having is someone added drywall and trim at a later date and did an amateur job. The baseboards and door casing are almost flush with the dry wall and looks tacky. (This is an older home and most likely had wall paper originally.)

My question is, what is the best way to add new trim and have it sit on top of drywall like its suppose to, rather than flush with it. Now if I add 1/2" drywall, and place trim on top of it that will fix it, but would leave raw drywall edge around door frame how do you guys usually address this? Thanks
You might have more than one layer of drywall. I would remove the casing around one door to see what your dealing with, and then post photos if necessary. The jamb dimension will need to match the finished wall dimension--and that can be done when recasing the door.

Generally, decide on the appearance of the casing you want--most likely to match what is done elsewhere in the house. Remove drywall in the areas where it doesn't look right and re-drywall. Be sure everything is plumb and square, use the appropriate corner beads, etc. Rebuild the casings to match. Once the drywall is redone, the casing situation should be clear.
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Old 09-03-2015, 04:01 PM   #7
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Keymaster beat me to it concerning the drywall. You see this a lot in older homes that were used for rental properties. If this is the case do yourself a favor and also check out all the floors, ceilings, etc..

I've seen where floors were laying on the ground with another floor built right on top of it. Floors that sagged up to 1 foot and they just used plywood to level it out. Double walls that revealed another space. I had one call where a second floor collapsed because of all the weight, balloon structure houses are really known for this.
You never know......
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Old 09-03-2015, 04:41 PM   #8
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Keymaster beat me to it concerning the drywall. You see this a lot in older homes that were used for rental properties. If this is the case do yourself a favor and also check out all the floors, ceilings, etc..

I've seen where floors were laying on the ground with another floor built right on top of it. Floors that sagged up to 1 foot and they just used plywood to level it out. Double walls that revealed another space. I had one call where a second floor collapsed because of all the weight, balloon structure houses are really known for this.
You never know......
This was a 3 owner home built circa 1925. Still has original hardwoods on first and second floor and other than the hallway here everything else appears original and untouched. Although there are areas that will need leveling.
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Old 09-03-2015, 04:52 PM   #9
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That is some of the worst drywall hackery I've ever seen, with the possible exception of the last flip I worked on, with 4 layers of assorted ceiling material in the living room.

I'd definitely rip it all out; who knows how wrong it is underneath.
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Old 09-03-2015, 05:44 PM   #10
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This was a 3 owner home built circa 1925. Still has original hardwoods on first and second floor and other than the hallway here everything else appears original and untouched. Although there are areas that will need leveling.

The interior doors and hardware in the photo are great, and original (painted over, but still nice). Keep those. What does the other trim look like?
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Old 09-03-2015, 06:15 PM   #11
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The interior doors and hardware in the photo are great, and original (painted over, but still nice). Keep those. What does the other trim look like?
I'm all about restoring, So ill save everything. I've put old painted hardware in crock-pots to remove layers of paint. There are glass door knobs throughout and a lot of original French doors as well as five panel doors.
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Old 09-03-2015, 08:43 PM   #12
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I'm all about restoring, So ill save everything. I've put old painted hardware in crock-pots to remove layers of paint. There are glass door knobs throughout and a lot of original French doors as well as five panel doors.
That's good to hear. The french doors and five panels look nice. Is it possible that some of the trim is original, and just looks bad because of the depth and installation of the drywall? Something to consider, anyway. It's unusual to have original doors and new trim.
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