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Old 03-24-2007, 04:28 PM   #1
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DryVit vs. Vinyl Siding


How does DryVit compare in cost to Vinyl siding? Also how do the two compare in terms of difficulty of installation?
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Old 03-24-2007, 04:40 PM   #2
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If you have wood framing, forget about Dryvit. It may not even be permitted. If you have steel studs or concrete masonry it can be a good product.

Dryvit is not for amateurs. Vinyl siding can be a DIY product.

Nothing is cheaper than vinyl siding period!!!!!
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Old 03-24-2007, 05:14 PM   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by concretemasonry View Post
If you have wood framing, forget about Dryvit. It may not even be permitted. If you have steel studs or concrete masonry it can be a good product.

Dryvit is not for amateurs. Vinyl siding can be a DIY product.

Nothing is cheaper than vinyl siding period!!!!!
Really? So I'm assuming the weight of the DryVit is just too much for wood framing, yes?
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Old 03-24-2007, 08:30 PM   #4
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No, it is simply not suitable for application over wood framing. If you want that look and have a wood framed home, consider a 3 coat cementious stucco application. It is not so cheap as vinyl, but it is a better product when done right.
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Old 03-24-2007, 08:58 PM   #5
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No, it is simply not suitable for application over wood framing. If you want that look and have a wood framed home, consider a 3 coat cementious stucco application. It is not so cheap as vinyl, but it is a better product when done right.
How do you prep the walls for the stucco? I'm assuming some sort of mesh material?
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Old 03-24-2007, 09:09 PM   #6
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If you were to strip the walls to bare studs, you would apply building paper, then metal lath, then a scratchcoat of stucco, then a browncoat, then a finish coat. Casing all edges, flashing all openings, and using expansion joints in all the right places, of course.
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Old 04-02-2007, 07:28 AM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tscarborough View Post
If you were to strip the walls to bare studs, you would apply building paper, then metal lath, then a scratchcoat of stucco, then a browncoat, then a finish coat. Casing all edges, flashing all openings, and using expansion joints in all the right places, of course.
Just curious why would this be acceptable but not DryVit? The stucco and metal lath seem to me after all is said and done to be a heavier material than the DryVit (but i am of course just assuming)?
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Old 04-02-2007, 08:26 AM   #8
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The weight is not an issue. The issue is one of water penetration/moisture extraction.
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Old 04-02-2007, 11:10 AM   #9
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I thought the problem with dryit was installation related, not following proper installation methods, poor flashing etc?
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Old 04-02-2007, 12:00 PM   #10
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Zero Punch -

Installation problems with Dryvit include product control and uniformity, and proper methods. Too many contractors did and still not know what they are doing and treat it like the traditional, proven stucco applications. The materials used are sensitive and uniformity is critical.

The other installation problem is relate to windows/doors/vents where a possible moisture problem is created. The Dryvit system increases the effect of any window/door installation problems or gaps anywhere in the walls. The fact that 60% of the windows installed are installed improperly does not help. Any gaps in the wall systen will funnel the air and moisture through a small area, where is can collect and cause future rot, mold and othe moisture problems.

Many of the "cute" architectural treatments at critical areas around openings were difficult to install properly and offered possible point of moisture accumulation and leakage.

Because of the problems, many places do not permit Dryvit on wood frame structures, but do permit it on masonry structures. Masonry is more forgiving than wood when it comes to moisture and it does not contain any "food" for mold. Masonry walls are far more rigid, so deflection of the walls is vitrually zero, the possible cracks/openings is drastically reduced. Also, wood frame walls usually contain fiberglass and dust, that will hold the moisture and provide a place suitable for mold growth that will not dry out.

When evaluating Dryvit homes with moisture problems, it is very easy to predict the problem areas even before taking and moisture readings.

tripower -

Dryvit is not a DIY product. It will cost more than vinyle even if you could do it. Conventional stucco would also cost more than vinyl. In fact, everything is CHEAPER than vinyl. That is one of the reasons for the dramatic increase of cultured stone to make a vinyl sided home set itself off from the other monotinous looking homes at a reasonable cost.
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Old 04-02-2007, 06:26 PM   #11
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yea, forget the dryvit. Class action lawsuits, required disclosure when selling in some areas. Special techniques to make it work. No long term track record when done properly, very poor track record when done not just right. Google dryvit lawsuit.

Dryvit is one brand of synthentic stucco. No synthetic stucco is a DIY job and all brands can lead to major issues if not done right.
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Old 04-03-2007, 07:23 AM   #12
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heres another consideration I checked into the Dryvit for my house and although it looks real nice you can not do it yourself .You must be trained and lic.through them to install it and second the cost is rather high.I decided to go with the three step accrillic stuco it cost more then siding but imo will look alot better and give the house a better seal plus I get the satisfaction of doing it myself eventhough its alot of work
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Old 04-10-2009, 07:28 PM   #13
 
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Dryvit question


Hello to concretemasonry. Tell me, please, do you know if Dryvit needs to be painted or sealed after application? A friend had it installed on a 3-car garage he built. Caulking at joints/windows seems appropriate, but I wonder if the product allows any moisture infiltration that would be prevented if the Dryvit was sealed or painted. Thank you!
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Quote:
Originally Posted by concretemasonry View Post
Zero Punch -

Installation problems with Dryvit include product control and uniformity, and proper methods. Too many contractors did and still not know what they are doing and treat it like the traditional, proven stucco applications. The materials used are sensitive and uniformity is critical.

The other installation problem is relate to windows/doors/vents where a possible moisture problem is created. The Dryvit system increases the effect of any window/door installation problems or gaps anywhere in the walls. The fact that 60% of the windows installed are installed improperly does not help. Any gaps in the wall systen will funnel the air and moisture through a small area, where is can collect and cause future rot, mold and othe moisture problems.

Many of the "cute" architectural treatments at critical areas around openings were difficult to install properly and offered possible point of moisture accumulation and leakage.

Because of the problems, many places do not permit Dryvit on wood frame structures, but do permit it on masonry structures. Masonry is more forgiving than wood when it comes to moisture and it does not contain any "food" for mold. Masonry walls are far more rigid, so deflection of the walls is vitrually zero, the possible cracks/openings is drastically reduced. Also, wood frame walls usually contain fiberglass and dust, that will hold the moisture and provide a place suitable for mold growth that will not dry out.

When evaluating Dryvit homes with moisture problems, it is very easy to predict the problem areas even before taking and moisture readings.

tripower -

Dryvit is not a DIY product. It will cost more than vinyle even if you could do it. Conventional stucco would also cost more than vinyl. In fact, everything is CHEAPER than vinyl. That is one of the reasons for the dramatic increase of cultured stone to make a vinyl sided home set itself off from the other monotinous looking homes at a reasonable cost.
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Old 04-10-2009, 09:15 PM   #14
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I don't get the comparison. Dryvit v. vinyl? They're two TOTALLY different looks. Do you want a stucco look? or siding look? That should make your decision.

As to the product - ever seen a house damaged by a bad Dryvit install? I have. - on an insurance company inspection - I could push my arm through the exterior wall.

Fist - THROUGH - wall.

Dryvit, plywood sheathing, clear on through the cavity to the drywall - all of it rotted and damaged beyond repair. BTW, the homeowner signed off on the install, so the contractor wasn't going to pay, Dryvit (despite MILLIONS of dollars of lawsuits) wasn't going to pay (b/c it's an 'install issue'), and the HOers insurance sure as heck wasn't going to pay. The guy's house was quite literally falling down around him.
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Old 04-10-2009, 10:07 PM   #15
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by concretemasonry View Post
Zero Punch -

...Masonry walls are far more rigid, so deflection of the walls is vitrually zero, the possible cracks/openings is drastically reduced...
This is not exactly true. Masonry is in fact more rigid than wood, but masonry is also less ductile than wood. Meaning that when masonry does deflect it has less of a chance of returning to its original shape/position. This is why steel reinforcement is added to masonry.

In fact the deflection criteria for masonry is much more strict than it is for wood. Typically the most restrictive deflection required for wood structural members is L/360 for floors (the span of the member in inches divided by 360), and in most cases walls are L/240 . For masonry deflection is limited to L/600. So for a 9' tall wall a masonry wall is only allowed to deflect 0.18", the same 9' wall framed with wood is allowed to deflect 0.45".

So whats the point? If you want to use a material that is easily cracked as finish on wood framing, you just need to use bigger sections (2x8 instead of a 2x6), in order to limit deflection.

My opinion is that DryVit is just not a very good product, it's extremely difficult to be consistent with. And moisture problems for wood vs. masonry is not really the concern, because it can be bad for both for different reasons. I'm not really a big fan of vinyl either.

My recommendation is that when you are looking at the construction/renovation of your homes exterior walls is that you concentrate on and extensively research how you can prevent moisture and air infiltration, and how you can maximize the R-value. Search for construction details and really read everything (brochures, specifications, etc.) that you can get from material manufactures. This will help you decide what type of exterior finish is right for you.
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