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Old 06-28-2009, 04:23 PM   #16
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Can you cover over the dirt with plastic or concrete or asphalt or. . .?

Last edited by Yoyizit; 06-28-2009 at 04:35 PM.
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Old 06-28-2009, 04:25 PM   #17
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Not a bad idea, since septic systems put waste into the soil anyways



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Old 06-28-2009, 05:22 PM   #18
 
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Our problem is no longer "how to remove the dirt or what to cover it with". We now have about 12 inches of water in our crawl space that we can not pump out ourselves because the restoration company has notified the EPA and the restoration comp. is NOT doing anything but telling us that it is not their fault."

Our home still smells of Last resort. Mosquitoes are breeding in the water and we having been in a hotel since May 30th for something that should have only taken 3 days Max...we need ans. because no one is telling us the truth.
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Old 06-28-2009, 05:26 PM   #19
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So you normally have to have a sump pump going in order to keep the crawl space dry?

What's down there - just dirt? Water heater or any mechanicals?
I'd still fill it in w/concrete
Once it hardens have any remaining sludge/water pumped out



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Old 06-28-2009, 08:58 PM   #20
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Have you thought about an atty that specialized in construction or Haz Mat?
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Old 06-29-2009, 06:31 AM   #21
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Wow! sounds like a bureaucratic nightmare, sorry.

I just know that the water damage industry up here anyways has gone to some lengths to avoid such snafus by using what we call the Blue Book; the Blue Book is a cost reference bible that both insurance adjusters and contractors use to establish what each and every procedure costs. What this does is eliminate any confusion or disagreement (which is what you may have) about what work is to be done and how much contractors can charge - and most importantly what the insurance companies will cover.

There is no haggling. No trying to find a cheaper contractor and therefore no wasted time. And that is perhaps the reason for it. It allows me as a contractor to "do the job first" (i.e. mitigate or fix the problem FIRST) and get paid later. No delays. The contractor is chosen by the homeowner and the procedures are all written up in the training manuals we each have. It is therefore impossible to overcharge or underwork: procedures are established and have a finite cost per square foot, per wall, per hour or something. And everything is measured. For example, in a flooded basement situation, we have to record the existing hunidity conditons before, during and after our work to prove what we did was done correctly. Otherwise no pay...

I would have thought that you had the right to find a certified contractor and hire him to do the work. That might have been a problem, granted, but that contractor should have started the work and asked questions later. But it seems like someone is playing hot potatoe with your case, over costs, jurisdictions, availability - or competence.

If you have had to get a determination done of whether or not the water is considered "contaminated", it sort of like "how long is a piece of string?" Open-ended question...what are they looking for? the level or the identity of each contaminant?

Seems to me the level of contamination is foremost. Anything else is just time wasting. Your restoration contactor doesn't know what level there is so can't decide on what equipment to use...meanwhile we're all waiting for some lab geek to establish what bacteria there are as an academic exercise....contractor doesn't want to do stuff and not get paid, cheap insurance company doesn't want to overpay....classic case for the existence of the Blue Book.

Had this been a water damage case uniquely, we would have been out there, cleaned it all up and then justified it later with the insurance company because we have the training and expertise to know what to do - no more no less. No debate. That's why adjustors need training too, so that we're both on the same page - with the customers welfare at heart.

I am familiar with Unsmokes' 'Last Resort'; as a chemist I can tell you it has alcohol in it that probably evaporated within a few hours having killed off a certain population of bacteria but then was overrun by sheer numbers. So it was a waste of chemicals. Bacteria came back, hence a breeding ground for mosquitoes. What's the mystery? You seek the truth...want to debate this too?

And what's with the new contractor that you don't like? I understand your frustration but in times like this, action is required. Not just any action but the right action. If the insurance company brings in their own guy, on their dime, let them at it and stay out of their way. I hope for your sake their guy knows what he doing and has the courage to do the right thing first then ask questions later.

But I can't blame him, in your litigeous society, for not getting involved. After all, with the proper lawyer, you could probably sue him and put him into bankrupcy. We don't have that up here.
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Old 06-29-2009, 12:48 PM   #22
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ccarlisle View Post
Wow! sounds like a bureaucratic nightmare, sorry.


There is no haggling. No trying to find a cheaper contractor and therefore no wasted time. And that is perhaps the reason for it. It allows me as a contractor to "do the job first" (i.e. mitigate or fix the problem FIRST) and get paid later. No delays. The contractor is chosen by the homeowner and the procedures are all written up in the training manuals we each have. It is therefore impossible to overcharge or underwork: procedures are established and have a finite cost per square foot, per wall, per hour or something. And everything is measured. For example, in a flooded basement situation, we have to record the existing hunidity conditons before, during and after our work to prove what we did was done correctly. Otherwise no pay...

I would have thought that you had the right to find a certified contractor and hire him to do the work. That might have been a problem, granted, but that contractor should have started the work and asked questions later. But it seems like someone is playing hot potatoe with your case, over costs, jurisdictions, availability - or competence.

If you have had to get a determination done of whether or not the water is considered "contaminated", it sort of like "how long is a piece of string?" Open-ended question...what are they looking for? the level or the identity of each contaminant?

Seems to me the level of contamination is foremost. Anything else is just time wasting. Your restoration contactor doesn't know what level there is so can't decide on what equipment to use...meanwhile we're all waiting for some lab geek to establish what bacteria there are as an academic exercise....contractor doesn't want to do stuff and not get paid, cheap insurance company doesn't want to overpay....classic case for the existence of the Blue Book.

Had this been a water damage case uniquely, we would have been out there, cleaned it all up and then justified it later with the insurance company because we have the training and expertise to know what to do - no more no less. No debate. That's why adjustors need training too, so that we're both on the same page - with the customers welfare at heart.

I am familiar with Unsmokes' 'Last Resort'; as a chemist I can tell you it has alcohol in it that probably evaporated within a few hours having killed off a certain population of bacteria but then was overrun by sheer numbers. So it was a waste of chemicals. Bacteria came back, hence a breeding ground for mosquitoes. What's the mystery? You seek the truth...want to debate this too?

And what's with the new contractor that you don't like? I understand your frustration but in times like this, action is required. Not just any action but the right action. If the insurance company brings in their own guy, on their dime, let them at it and stay out of their way. I hope for your sake their guy knows what he doing and has the courage to do the right thing first then ask questions later.

But I can't blame him, in your litigeous society, for not getting involved. After all, with the proper lawyer, you could probably sue him and put him into bankrupcy. We don't have that up here.
Thank you for listening. It is SO frustrating. We are getting the water tested on our own dime. Since, no one wants to touch the contaiminated water.

Why my adjustor is forcing us to us a company is beyond me. We are going on almost 1 month of this run around. I would think that if the company we are being forced to use is dragging their feet than why not ditch them. The EPA document was written out on 6/8. It is 6/29. The EPA did not rec. the document until we sent it to them. blah blah.


I need someone who knows what is the right and what is the wrong way to handle this stuff because our ins. company is not helpful and the restoration company is blaming the enviromental compant and our local dept of health does not understand why NO ONE has tested the water. Our local dept of health is great with info but it ends there..we need results.
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Old 06-29-2009, 03:12 PM   #23
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Contact your State's Attorney; it can't hurt, it might help, and it's free.
These other parties to this situation are not now motivated to speed this up.

I don't guess you put an exhaust fan in your crawl space? Using 8 air changes per hour and a crawl space volume of 3' x 30' x 40' = 3600, 3600x8/60 = ~500 CFM. The entering air should come in from the wall opposite where the fan is.

Last edited by Yoyizit; 06-29-2009 at 08:27 PM.
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