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Old 06-26-2014, 12:59 PM   #1
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Demolotion of wall


I have a wall that divides up the kitchen, dining room, foyer and living room. I plan on removing it this weekend. I was told it is not a weight bearing wall as it looks like a regular interior wall with a built closet on one side.

What is the easiet way to remove the drywall, wood frame and move the electrical wire out the way.

Any tools that would make the demo easier as I will be saving about 800 by doing this myself.
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Old 06-26-2014, 01:05 PM   #2
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FastEddie26 View Post
I was told it is not a weight bearing wall.
Told by whom and how did they determine that?
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Old 06-26-2014, 01:35 PM   #3
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The realtor I worked with has been working in that neighborhood since the 70s. He has seen other folks do the change we are proposing. I'd like to verify it is not load bearing myself.

I have attached the image and the wall in question is the wall between the kitcken, dining room, living room. It does not touch an exterior wall.
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Demolotion of wall-floor_plan.jpg  
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Old 06-26-2014, 01:50 PM   #4
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A picture from outside of the house and from inside of the attic will be needed--

If the house has self supporting roof trusses,it might be a partition--

That closet wall might be supporting headers that hold up the ceiling,if it is conventional framing.

A Saws All to cut nails --a flat bar --and trash bags is about it for tools--but you really need to get someone in that knows structure--

I've seen the result of pulling out a bearing wall improperly----think big money wasted---BIG.
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Old 06-26-2014, 01:59 PM   #5
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Are you talking about the wall between kitchen and dinning AND the wall with the closet? If so it would be best to go up in the attic and see if ceiling joists are joined on top of the walls, if so then it is a weight bearing wall and can not just be removed, if the ceiling joists just lay cross the wall, you should be OK provided the wall isn't being used to hold any other type of weight like an AC or kickers for the rafters and such.

It would be best to make sure the walls are not weight bearing before removing, it sure is hard to repair a ceiling once it comes down, not to mention maybe a hospital bill or a funeral.
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Old 06-26-2014, 02:08 PM   #6
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You have some good advice.Why would you take the word of a realtor on the structure of your home?
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Old 06-26-2014, 03:57 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FastEddie26 View Post
The realtor I worked with has been working in that neighborhood since the 70s. He has seen other folks do the change we are proposing. I'd like to verify it is not load bearing myself.
not all homes are built the same way. follow the advise given above.

good luck!
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Old 06-26-2014, 03:59 PM   #8
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I've gotten on the phone with the structural engineers to inspect this. It will run about 500 for the inspection in case someone out there is curious.
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Old 06-26-2014, 06:23 PM   #9
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If you can find a framing crew you could pay the head worker to tell you if the walls are loaded or not. If you can take some pictures of the top of the walls from the attic maybe we can tell if it is loaded or not.
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Old 06-26-2014, 06:32 PM   #10
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It's easy to tell - take a big light up to the attic, though, in case there are hostile squirrels. You may have to move the insulation back a bit. A bearing wall will have a 2 joists together, in a line over that wall. It should not be under an air conditioning unit or heater. If the attic is plywooded over, there should be a line of 'extra' nailing where the joists lap.
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Old 06-26-2014, 07:39 PM   #11
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VChucks: Where the hell do you get your info from?Thr internet or are you just trying to be fummy?
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Old 06-28-2014, 11:43 PM   #12
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I got an engineer to come out and verify the walls are not load bearing.

Demo will begin tomorrow, and what are some good tricks to demo a wall quickly?
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Old 06-28-2014, 11:52 PM   #13
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You might want to go up in the attic and pull the sheet rock nailers off the top of the top plates, if not it is going to tear your sheet rock up. Using a sheet rock knife cut the sheet rock tape where the walls meet the ceiling or there is a good chance you will mess up the sheet rock.
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Old 06-29-2014, 07:09 AM   #14
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I use a Saws All to cut the nails at the bottom plate---a Milwaukee demo blade will cut wood and nails---once the stud is loose--pull it out--

Put the blade in upside down---this allows you to make clean flush cuts at the floor and ceiling--

Top and bottom plates are easiest to remove if you cut them into short sections--16" long---then there is only one set of nails ---
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