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-   -   Connect Glulam Beam End to End (https://www.diychatroom.com/f19/connect-glulam-beam-end-end-203007/)

DM007 07-01-2014 11:29 PM

Connect Glulam Beam End to End
 
I can't find a column cap that will connect two glulam beams end to end. Something like the Simpson CQQ. I read somewhere that the CQQ was not recommended to be used for two beams end to end.
Any suggestions will be appreciated, thank you.

MTN REMODEL LLC 07-02-2014 12:20 AM

Don't know your application/specs, but you might have to have it designed/engineered and custom made/welded.

joecaption 07-02-2014 06:48 AM

Checked on the web site of the company that made the Glulam?
Often times there's a ton of install directions and suggested fasteners.
More details on exactly what your trying to build may be helpful.

kwikfishron 07-02-2014 07:02 AM

199 Attachment(s)
Quote:

Originally Posted by DM007 (Post 1370972)
I can't find a column cap that will connect two glulam beams end to end. Something like the Simpson CQQ. I read somewhere that the CQQ was not recommended to be used for two beams end to end.
Any suggestions will be appreciated, thank you.

Assuming you mean CCQ where do you see that you can't splice a beam on it?

DM007 07-02-2014 11:01 AM

You're right is CCQ. I read it somewhere online can't remember. But do you know if you can connect two beams end to end on a CCQ? I want to try and use the same 6x6 post for a span on one side of 25' and the other side of 17'. The other ends of both beams will be resting on a bearing wall, more less it looks like a "T" with a bearing wall on each end, thanks.

MTN REMODEL LLC 07-02-2014 12:15 PM

Well... It very well may fit..... but it is still an engineering issue...

ddawg16 07-02-2014 12:56 PM

My second story would appear to be very similar to what you are describing....I have two PSL beams joined in the middle with a Simpson connector and 4x4 post. My drawings do not actually call out the Simpson connector in this area....but it did for the ends....EPC

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e3...0515-00104.jpg

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e3...0515-00105.jpg

What I used in the middle was not supper critical due to shear forces being handled by the roof sheathing and straps. Being the OCD person I am, I went pretty beefy....and I still have an MST-37 across the top holding the two beams together.

Daniel Holzman 07-02-2014 01:29 PM

The critical question in designing a method of connecting two glulam beams is the force that must be transmitted across the beams. The potential force across two beams joined end to end could include torsion (twisting), shear (both vertical and horizontal), and moment (bending). The required method of attachment depends entirely on which of these forces needs to be resisted, and the magnitude of the forces.

In standard framing, the joining techniques are usually spelled out in the building code, so you can be pretty certain that if you follow the code, you are going to achieve satisfactory results. In your case, there is not going to be a code section that details the connection, so you are going to need an engineer or architect to design the connection for you, based on the actual loads the connection needs to resist.

MTN REMODEL LLC 07-02-2014 01:58 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Daniel Holzman (Post 1371103)
The critical question in designing a method of connecting two glulam beams is the force that must be transmitted across the beams. The potential force across two beams joined end to end could include torsion (twisting), shear (both vertical and horizontal), and moment (bending). The required method of attachment depends entirely on which of these forces needs to be resisted, and the magnitude of the forces.

In standard framing, the joining techniques are usually spelled out in the building code, so you can be pretty certain that if you follow the code, you are going to achieve satisfactory results. In your case, there is not going to be a code section that details the connection, so you are going to need an engineer or architect to design the connection for you, based on the actual loads the connection needs to resist.

Thanks Dan...:thumbsup:



(Ya mean you can't just toenail them together:wink:)

Best

ddawg16 07-02-2014 02:15 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by MTN REMODEL LLC (Post 1371114)
Thanks Dan...:thumbsup:



(Ya mean you can't just toenail them together:wink:)

Best

I guess duct tape is out of the question as well?

stadry 07-05-2014 05:55 AM

would baling wire work ?

irc


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