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Old 07-16-2009, 05:20 PM   #16
 
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I know what I'll be doing Saturday! thanks everyone for all of your input!
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Old 07-16-2009, 05:32 PM   #17
 
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I agree with the info given by Scuba Dave and Wildie! But lets look at just one more item! How is the roof attached at the house? Is the roof just attached to the freeze board? What do the posts against the house do?

Paul
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Old 07-16-2009, 06:42 PM   #18
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Quote:
Originally Posted by skitch4110 View Post
I know what I'll be doing Saturday! thanks everyone for all of your input!
Ok, now I'm really getting myself twisted around
I just realized the sizing spec I used is for a deck you are walking on
And this is "only" a roof - less load ( I think)

So....sorry - but I can't find anything to verify the sizing of the beam as a roof



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Old 07-16-2009, 06:56 PM   #19
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I did find this in a search
The person had a 14' span with new (2) 2x6's that was sagging supporting a porch roof. The roof was 14' x 6'

http://newsgroups.derkeiler.com/Arch.../msg02624.html

Quote:
The building inspector came out to do the framing inspection before it was
covered up by the new vinyl. The first thing he said is there is a sag in
the middle that he could see right away just driving down the street while
approaching the house. Then he said he thought it may be "under span" and
measured that the span is 14 feet. He said he would check whatever
reference chart he had and said that using 2 2x6's is insufficient for a
14-foot span.


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Old 07-16-2009, 08:35 PM   #20
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[quote=Scuba_Dave;302742](2) 2x12's which = 3" x 9.25"

(2) 2x12= 3" x 11.25"
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Old 07-16-2009, 09:22 PM   #21
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Don't you have to pull a permit to build that?
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Old 07-16-2009, 09:43 PM   #22
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Call your local B.D. and ask them the snow load in your local area. Tell them the species of 4x6 and the span. ask them, not someone looking in a book at the wrong page/table. Explain how you put ply under the corr. roofing not wood supports, to breath.

If you are in FL or CL, high wind or seismic area, special requirements are needed. Go through the permit process as Framer53 said, as your family's and visitor's safety is at risk. Notify the Insurance Co. of the new roof so they will pay when/if it fails. Be safe, G
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Old 07-16-2009, 09:55 PM   #23
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1) Everyplace I inspect, those posts have to be appropriately anchored to appropriately sized footings.

2) How is that structure attached to the house?

I realize that a vertical loads are supported by posts set against the wall, but if a good wind (say, a microburst, like we get around here) grabs that canopy the problem is going to be uplift and lateral forces, and there is no adequate way to attach that to the brick veneer - you need tie that back in at the studs and/or top plate, and you better hope the sheathing runs all the way up to the plate and is properly nailed because otherwise you're going to start moving rafters should that shed roof start to move.

Also, the outboard end is not braced against lateral movement (for example by diagonal bracing between the posts in the structure above), if the wind starts to push it sideways the roof will act as a lever arm and possibly tear the entire structure right off the wall... taking a couple of feet of brick veneer with it.

Sorry to sound so alarming about this, but as things stand that's an awfully big kite with an awfully thin string.

-----------------

At this point IMO the smart thing to do is to get a structural engineer to design repairs compliant with local requirements.

I know a lot of posters here will say that's ridiculous overkill for a little canopy - that any competent contractor should be able to straighten it out - but I constantly see decks, canopies and the like built by experienced contractors that violate code requirements and sound construction practices, the problem is that these "little" projects don't "seem like" they should be difficult to design and build, but experience has taught me that for just this reason fundamental requirements are often overlooked.

That's my $.02, worth, anyway.

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Old 07-16-2009, 09:58 PM   #24
 
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Although the beams at the house are tied to the freeze boards I know that is not structurally sound. The porch cover is also tied into a roofing joist through the sofet ( not sure of the wording) in 2 places. 1 length and 1 width. Both with 2x6 braces. Even though there is very little weight on this thing I am concerned that the weight of the beams alone will sag as scuba Dave pointed out. It's up... but it's not too late to modify for safety. Any suggestions are appreciated.
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