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Old 01-03-2010, 12:11 PM   #1
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Cold Bedroom


Hello,

At the front of our house we have a bedroom that is going to be our new nursery. However it gets very cold compared to the rest of the house in the winter.

It has three large windows that face the front of the house. In the attic it has R20 cell insulation but the covered front porch is vented. Could it be to much cold air coming from there?

The air duct from the furnace is a 6 inch pipe but it is the furthest run from the furnace. I have read about inline booster fans but when the furnace is running I can feel heat coming from the vent.

The basement underneath is not finished and it is where all the electrical and water comes in the house. Could I be losing heat there as well?

Any ideas would greatly be appreciated. Thank you in advance
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Old 01-03-2010, 12:26 PM   #2
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FirefighterGW View Post
Hello,

At the front of our house we have a bedroom that is going to be our new nursery. However it gets very cold compared to the rest of the house in the winter.

It has three large windows that face the front of the house. In the attic it has R20 cell insulation but the covered front porch is vented. Could it be to much cold air coming from there?

The air duct from the furnace is a 6 inch pipe but it is the furthest run from the furnace. I have read about inline booster fans but when the furnace is running I can feel heat coming from the vent.

The basement underneath is not finished and it is where all the electrical and water comes in the house. Could I be losing heat there as well?

Any ideas would greatly be appreciated. Thank you in advance
You could have multiple issues.
Are the rim joists insulated under this room?
How much insulation is there where the top plate is on the exterior wall? Are the exterior walls properly insulated? Was this room originally an open or 3 season porch?
Just because there is heat coming from the duct, doesn't mean the correct amount of heat is coming out. Are the ducts insulated from the furnace to this room?
Is the basement under this room heated?
Most of the insulating can be done DIY, but you might need a pro to check the heat volume for the room.
Ron
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Old 01-03-2010, 03:08 PM   #3
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The rim joists are insulated but it is just cut pink insulation that has been stuffed in. I can easily remove it by hand and feel the cold. Would I be better served insulating this area with a spray foam like Tiger foam or just put better batts of Roxul in?

I will need to go up in the attic again to check the top plate for insulation depth. I will get to that tomorrow.

I assume the exterior walls are R12 as this is code for our area. The walls themselves are somewhat cold to touch but I cannot remove the drywall to verify

It was never open nor a 3 season porch. The house is 2 years old and was built this way

No the ducts are not insulated and the basement is not insulated so I agree there is some heat loss there. What is the best way to insulate the duct work?

The basement is heated but most of the vents are closed as we don't use the space currently
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Old 01-03-2010, 03:26 PM   #4
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I think I will go with this method of insulating my rim joists properly and reuse the pink insulation around the duct work

http://doverprojects.blogspot.com/20...im-joists.html
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Old 01-03-2010, 04:44 PM   #5
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I think I will go with this method of insulating my rim joists properly and reuse the pink insulation around the duct work

http://doverprojects.blogspot.com/20...im-joists.html
Rigid foam boards are excellent products for this use. You can use the foam in a can if there are gaps around the perimeter.
They sell round tube insulation you can slide right over the ducts. They come in 4"-10" in the big box stores.
If your house is that new, the walls should be properly insulated.
You might check the perimeter of the windows for drafts due to openings between the window frame and the R.O. frame.
After all the insulating, if the situation isn't remedied, I would have the heat flow checked.
Ron
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Old 01-03-2010, 04:49 PM   #6
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Thanks for your help Ron, much appreciated
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Old 01-03-2010, 05:37 PM   #7
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R20 in the attic? Double it.

Put heavy curtains on the three big windows. Even light curtains will stop a lot of the draft that comes off them.

Insulate the floor of just this room. Rigid foam is easy to put up and will make a big difference. Heat radiates equally in all directions (but more to where it's coldest.) If it's 50F in the basement you'll loose a lot of heat to it.

Consider an oil filled radiator space heater if it's still too cold.
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Old 01-03-2010, 06:34 PM   #8
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Yup.

No matter where you are, stick to the most stringent building codes known in North America. They're good for every citizen...Goerge Bush.

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Old 01-03-2010, 07:08 PM   #9
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Yup.

No matter where you are, stick to the most stringent building codes known in North America. They're good for every citizen...Goerge Bush.


Doesn't matter what the code is. If the room is cold compared to the rest of the house, then adding more insulation to that room will decrease the heat loss from that room, resulting in a warmer room.

Assuming there aren't infiltration problems...
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