Building A Tigerwood Deck Over A Flat Rubber Porch Roof - Building & Construction - DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum
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Old 07-21-2015, 05:50 AM   #1
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Building a tigerwood deck over a flat rubber porch roof


(I wasn't sure if this should go in the roofing section or where, so figured this forum kind of covered it all)

I have two flat (or actually just slightly pitched) 2nd floor porches that are currently covered with black rubber roofs. One is approximately 10 feet x 14 feet and has been patched numerous times (I just bought the home this year) and that one also came with a stack of well worn deck panels made out of regular treated lumber that fit over the porch/roof space to form a deck over the black rubber roof.

The second porch is somewhat smaller, approximately 8 feet x 12 feet and didn't have any old deck panels that came with it and that rubber roof is in somewhat better shape, but if I'd have someone come and replace the other rubber roof, I figure I'd have them both redone at the same time.

What I'd like to do is to build new decking panels for both porches, they are both very useable and I know that rubber roofs aren't the best to have people walking all over on a regular basis, but I just want to make sure that what I build doesn't damage the rubber roof at all.

Since the spaces aren't that large and its a nice, older home, I'd like to use Tigerwood for the decking and had planned on using regular treated lumber for the joists under the decking, with the joists running in the right direction so as not to screw up the slight pitch for the drainage.

I would think this should work out fine and would construct it in sections, but then have it screwed together to seem more like one big, continuous deck, but which could be fairly easily taken apart back into sections in case any access to the rubber roof is needed.

Do you think it might be a smart idea to line the undersides of the joists that would be coming into contact with the rubber roof with some heavy felt or anything else, just to reduce any wear and tear on the rubber roofing? Any other suggestions? Thanks!!!
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Old 07-21-2015, 07:33 AM   #2
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It's done all the time, attach a properly flashed ledger to the house, and the rest of the deck floats on the EPDM. You are correct you want to uses some kind of protection, when we do them I leave extra reinforced EPDM for the deck builders to use. Use screws so that it can be taken apart. Also replacing the roofing before you do this is a good idea, plus do some kind of water test before the deck is built.
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Old 07-21-2015, 09:54 AM   #3
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Be sure that the structure can handle it. It is close to twice as heavy as basic pine pt.

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Old 07-21-2015, 05:19 PM   #4
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I know you didn't ask about choice of decking material, but if you are looking for exotic hardwood decking, I would suggest ipe. Nothing prettier than fresh tigerwood, but my experience is that ipe holds it color much better than tigerwood.
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Old 07-21-2015, 05:57 PM   #5
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I know it's"done all the time" but it does not make it right.Why do you think so many of these roof/ decks fail???
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Old 07-21-2015, 06:14 PM   #6
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Improper installation. Mainly poor details.

We've done them that have lasted 20 + years, with all kinds of material over the top. Wood, pavers, stamped concrete.

Here's one sorry no finished pictures with the 24"X 24" pavers.

1/4" per foot tapered insulation, 1/2" densdeck over that. 60 mil EPDM with 6" seams.

Another one we did for the same builder, 60 Mil EPDM glued to the plywood 4" of fancy concrete over the top of it. The upper level was a wood deck, again sorry no pictures of the finish of that one.

Just because you don't know how to do it or know anyone who can doesn't mean it can not be done....
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Old 07-21-2015, 06:18 PM   #7
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This is what happens when you try and do a non free floating deck. Flashing the posts is hard.
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Old 07-21-2015, 11:06 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 1985gt View Post
This is what happens when you try and do a non free floating deck. Flashing the posts is hard.
What the heck is that HVAC duct doing running outside of the structure like that? Was (is) a deck built over it?
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Old 07-22-2015, 06:17 AM   #9
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Thanks for the responses everyone, an interesting mix of ideas and opinions! Also interesting that someone mentioned the actual weight of the VERY dense Tigerwood, which I first learned of while doing some more research today on working with it and they suggested using all carbide tipped blades I believe and that's when I figured out just how heavy it is. This is the MOST well built home I've ever owned, first floor for instance is poured concrete over steel trusses, 2nd floor uses 2x12;s for joists!

I'll keep you updated, first step is getting the current rubber roof replaced!
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Old 07-22-2015, 06:51 AM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Msradell View Post
What the heck is that HVAC duct doing running outside of the structure like that? Was (is) a deck built over it?
IIRC it was a drier vent duct. Yes a deck was put over it by someone else.

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Originally Posted by BT5150 View Post
Thanks for the responses everyone, an interesting mix of ideas and opinions! Also interesting that someone mentioned the actual weight of the VERY dense Tigerwood, which I first learned of while doing some more research today on working with it and they suggested using all carbide tipped blades I believe and that's when I figured out just how heavy it is. This is the MOST well built home I've ever owned, first floor for instance is poured concrete over steel trusses, 2nd floor uses 2x12;s for joists!

I'll keep you updated, first step is getting the current rubber roof replaced!

The devil is in the details as far as the roofing goes. It gets really expensive when you have to remove decking when you have a leak that needs patched.
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Old 07-22-2015, 08:55 AM   #11
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We see plenty of floating deck on commercial properties where large condo buildings will have a deck/entertainment area on the roof. Pretty commonplace in this area and they can do quite well if their engineered properly from the outset.
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Old 07-29-2015, 11:53 PM   #12
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Well I'm moving into the design phase now, I am going to definitely do it and I think I have a few pics of the existing porches, I'll take a look after this and post them if I do, if not I'll snap a few tomorrow (with a real camera) and post them then. As I mentioned, its the best built home I've ever torn into (I've torn into a fair number of mostly older homes here in the Milwaukee area, where we have a good number of older homes, as well as a lot of new ones, mostly in the burbs) This place was built in the late 30s, when I've seen many smaller older homes here using 2x8s and even 2x6s in some cases for floor joists but this place has poured concrete over steel trusses on the first floor and 2x12s between the first and 2nd floors. So, I'm not too concerned about the extra weight of using something like Tigerwood for the decking.

I talked to the company that built the decking for the rooftop area at my brother's restaurant here, which used Ipe wood and they used regular pressure treated lumber running perpendicular obviously for the structure under the Tigerwood and since its not that large of an area and the pressure treat wood is comparatively pretty reasonable to the Tigerwood, so I don't mind if the spacing isn't too wide for the pressure treat and I see that most dealers sell it in (as far as the 6" wide planks go) both 1" thick (nominal size I assume so really 3/4" thick) and 5/4 x 6 planks but I'm wondering if its worth the extra expense for the 5/4 x 6 planks or if I'll be fine with the 1 x 6s, for what won't be a regularly used deck, since this is a deck off of a bedroom, not a backyard deck or something like that. Also, as far as the spacing for the perpendicular structural boards underneath, I was thinking maybe 12" or 10", not ure any ideas?
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