Building Barn-site Work Completed But They Did Not Rent Packer For Pad... - Building & Construction - DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum
Advertisement


Go Back   DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum > Home Improvement > Building & Construction

CLICK HERE AND JOIN OUR COMMUNITY TODAY...IT'S FREE!

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Display Modes
Old 09-10-2010, 02:21 PM   #1
Newbie
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Posts: 2
Rewards Points: 10
Default

Building Barn-site work completed but they did not rent packer for pad...


Hello,

Building a barn. Had to have backhoe guy come in and level pad site for barn. He told me he did not have to use a packer to pack the dirt and that its packed good enough. It has rained a few times and he ran over it many, many times with a dump truck full of dirt and the dozer,etc. I am putting down concrete. Will I have issues with the foundation? If so, can my concrete guy do anything to help with cracking down the road?

THanks
clueless in TN is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Old 09-10-2010, 02:45 PM   #2
Old School
 
Willie T's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: St. Petersburg, FL Minds of moderate caliber ordinarily condemn everything which is beyond them.
Posts: 3,634
Rewards Points: 2,000
Default


Cracking is controled by putting "control joints" (or cuts) in the slab. The closer the joints are to one another, the less likely the concrete is to have random cracks. Some guys try to put joints at 10' intervals. Really not close enough. I, personally, like to see them no more than 6' apart.
__________________
"True eloquence consists in saying all that is necessary, and only that which is."
François Duc de La Rochefoucauld
Willie T

Last edited by Willie T; 09-10-2010 at 03:27 PM.
Willie T is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Old 09-10-2010, 02:54 PM   #3
Newbie
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Posts: 2
Rewards Points: 10
Default


Good to know. I have a few guys here working on something else and they tend to think I am going to have issues. They said that I will need rebar and steel in the concrete and 8" of concrete to not have problems. They did bring in alot ofi dirt but all in all it is probably 2ft high on one end and it starts to slope down to level.
clueless in TN is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Old 09-10-2010, 03:15 PM   #4
Licensed P.E./Home Insp
 
Aggie67's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: New Jersey
Posts: 757
Rewards Points: 844
Default


This smells like a load of trouble, if you ask me. I don't know how you got away with it. Usually there's an inspection before you pour, and I'd imagine the inspector would have an issue with it.
Aggie67 is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to Aggie67 For This Useful Post:
Gary in WA (09-10-2010)
Old 09-10-2010, 03:27 PM   #5
Registered User
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Posts: 11,730
Rewards Points: 526
Default


Cruise this site for re-bar, water ratios, pitting, curing, etc.: http://www.concretenetwork.com/concr...troljoints.htm


Gary
__________________
If any ads are present below my answer or words underlined/colored, I do not condone/support/use the product or services listed/linked to, they are there without my consent.
17,000 dryer fires a year, when did you last clean the inside of the dryer near motor or the exhaust ducting?
Gary in WA is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-10-2010, 05:06 PM   #6
nap
You talking to me?
 
nap's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: sw mi
Posts: 7,551
Rewards Points: 6,290
Default


If they removed dirt to level the site, there should be no need to compact the ground (unless they screwed up and had to add dirt to an area they over excavated). If they added dirt, it should be compacted. Driving a truck on it and a dozer will not adequately compact the dirt and especially not the complete area.
nap is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-10-2010, 05:33 PM   #7
Old School
 
Willie T's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: St. Petersburg, FL Minds of moderate caliber ordinarily condemn everything which is beyond them.
Posts: 3,634
Rewards Points: 2,000
Default


Now that we know they brought in "a lot of dirt", it is probably too late for much effective compacting. Compacting has to be done in progressive eight inch layers as the dirt is added.... not after a two foot depth of it has been put in.
__________________
"True eloquence consists in saying all that is necessary, and only that which is."
François Duc de La Rochefoucauld
Willie T
Willie T is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-10-2010, 05:49 PM   #8
Civil Engineer
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Boston
Posts: 5,832
Rewards Points: 5,246
Default


The key factor that determines how much, if any, compaction needs to be done is the type of soil you have. Granular soil, specifically sand and gravel, can be relatively easily compacted using ordinary equipment such as a truck or a bulldozer. Silty soil, especially if it is moist or wet, compacts very poorly, requires special equipment, and may be unusable as foundation material. Clay is in a special class by itself, generally cannot be compacted, and may be unusable if it is soft, expansive, or has other issues.

From your description, the foundation people may not have a clue what type of soil they are dealing with, and may have selected the wrong technique for compaction. For a large structure subject to damage if it settles or shifts, it is usually a good idea to have an experienced engineer look at the site, take appropriate soil borings, and offer expert advice on how to prepare the site for the foundation. Probably too late now, but might still be worth it to hire a professional engineer to review the entire construction.
Daniel Holzman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-11-2010, 12:18 AM   #9
Remodel and New Build GC
 
MTN REMODEL LLC's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: Colorado @ 7651'
Posts: 9,280
Rewards Points: 2,372
Default


Willie T and Dan Holzman and others are correct... You have potential for settlement and consequent cracking depending on the soil.

From a practical standpoint, and considering your uses and quality requirements for the barn, you can certainly mitigate the chances of settlement and cracking by 1) rent a jumping jack (not a plate tamper) and jump the hell out of your two foot fill end. Moisten the earth (not drench) it for several days to work the ground tighter. It should have been tamped in 6-8" lifts, but tampimg now will help some. 2) Add rebar in the center of your pour in a grid pattern on maybe 18" centers. If you don't expect really heavy tractors, you can use remesh. 3) Cut control joints which will mitigate random cracking, but won't stop settlement heaving.

As you mention no footers to your slab (mono pour) I'm assuming this is a pole barn on it's own piers/footings. If your intending somehow to build directly on the slab, the whole structure could have potential issues... and maybe you want to get a local professional opinion, as any settlement will not just affect your slab and floor, but the structural integrity of the whole structure..

Good luck ... Peter
MTN REMODEL LLC is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-11-2010, 12:24 AM   #10
Member
 
jlhaslip's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Edmonton, Alberta
Posts: 5,975
Rewards Points: 708
Default


set out a sprinkler onto the slab base for a couple of hours a day for a week or so before pouring. let it dry for a day and then run a plate tamper on it. Use as large a packer as you can rent. ours is about 700 pounds. If there is enough water in the base, it will pack.
__________________
Quote:
Short of cutting off a body part, the worst that can happen in woodworking is manufacturing really nice looking kindling. --- Quoted from lenaitch
jlhaslip is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
grounding the workpiece you're welding jarnold Electrical 43 01-03-2016 07:14 PM
Building a pole barn, need help rmbanas Building & Construction 22 11-04-2012 03:37 PM
What can the building department do after work is completed? bluefitness General DIY Discussions 6 05-01-2010 09:37 PM
help with major plumbing work in barn wombosi Plumbing 1 02-02-2009 08:58 PM
Site work question Jonny Homefixer Building & Construction 6 11-02-2006 08:43 AM




Top of Page | View New Posts