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Old 08-07-2019, 06:36 PM   #16
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Re: Beam From 3 2x10s


If you deck the top, do some reading orientation of the sheets and adhere to a proper nailing schedule. Those nails and sheets become a horizontal sheer wall of sorts and should provide adequate lateral support. Without that sheeting, I would certainly add temporary bracing.

Temp bracing is something us engineers strongly advise and builders like to avoid due to schedules and it has kill many workers in commercial builds. It doesn't take much to simply throw a couple 20' 2x4s on, and it helps true and square a structure. I doubt your project would be subject to major safety bracing concerns, but it is always good practice.

What I WILL advise is to add temporary long knee bracing to the 6x6 columns as you install the sheeting because you will otherwise have a potential unsafe situation until the sheeting is in place. Nails along the perimeter of a sheet are always more important than the field nails and spacings for perimeter nails should be closer.
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Old 08-07-2019, 06:46 PM   #17
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Re: Beam From 3 2x10s


Quote:
Originally Posted by viper View Post
If you deck the top, do some reading orientation of the sheets and adhere to a proper nailing schedule. Those nails and sheets become a horizontal sheer wall of sorts and should provide adequate lateral support. Without that sheeting, I would certainly add temporary bracing.

Temp bracing is something us engineers strongly advise and builders like to avoid due to schedules and it has kill many workers in commercial builds. It doesn't take much to simply throw a couple 20' 2x4s on, and it helps true and square a structure. I doubt your project would be subject to major safety bracing concerns, but it is always good practice.

What I WILL advise is to add temporary long knee bracing to the 6x6 columns as you install the sheeting because you will otherwise have a potential unsafe situation until the sheeting is in place. Nails along the perimeter of a sheet are always more important than the field nails and spacings for perimeter nails should be closer.
We brace the crap out of everything and then use that for scaffolding to work on beams and rafters.
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Old 08-07-2019, 07:01 PM   #18
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Re: Beam From 3 2x10s


This is our typical bracing and green board to walk on.

We cut the posts to height after they are stood.
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Old 08-08-2019, 03:01 PM   #19
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Re: Beam From 3 2x10s


I'm having some trouble finding orientation for sheer walls. From what I gather you want to hang the sheathing vertically, so the longer edge nailed all the way up the studs is a longer seam than if it was horizontal. For my case this would be running long way from the post side to the ledger side. I've read that roofing sheathing should be run with the long edge perpendicular to the rafters, so which should I do?

Neal, with your drawing, is the green bracing that you walk on on top of the rafters, or is it attached to the posts? It seems like temporary bracing would go under the rafters but then walking on them you would only be supported by the nails holding the board up. Also, what do you do about nail holes afterward? Obviously not an issue for the rafters, but i'm thinking about the posts which I plan to leave exposed. Only thing I can think of is try and put the nail holes where they will be hidden by trim.

Also, is the top horizontal board in your drawing the beam or additional bracing?

For the long knee bracing does it matter if it is nailed to the face of the post vs. cut to angles and nailed to the sides?

And to confirm, you guys said that the osb should be enough once it is up, that I don't need blocking between the rafters or permanent knee braces on the posts? Fun fact when you google around for knee bracing stuff you have a hard time avoiding medical knee braces. Even "post knee bracing" gave me stuff about what knee brace I should be wearing after surgery.

Thanks,
Richard

Last edited by rjschwar; 08-08-2019 at 03:15 PM.
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Old 08-09-2019, 12:30 PM   #20
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Re: Beam From 3 2x10s


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Originally Posted by rjschwar View Post
I'm having some trouble finding orientation for sheer walls. From what I gather you want to hang the sheathing vertically, so the longer edge nailed all the way up the studs is a longer seam than if it was horizontal. For my case this would be running long way from the post side to the ledger side. I've read that roofing sheathing should be run with the long edge perpendicular to the rafters, so which should I do?

Neal, with your drawing, is the green bracing that you walk on on top of the rafters, or is it attached to the posts? It seems like temporary bracing would go under the rafters but then walking on them you would only be supported by the nails holding the board up. Also, what do you do about nail holes afterward? Obviously not an issue for the rafters, but i'm thinking about the posts which I plan to leave exposed. Only thing I can think of is try and put the nail holes where they will be hidden by trim.

Also, is the top horizontal board in your drawing the beam or additional bracing?

For the long knee bracing does it matter if it is nailed to the face of the post vs. cut to angles and nailed to the sides?

And to confirm, you guys said that the osb should be enough once it is up, that I don't need blocking between the rafters or permanent knee braces on the posts? Fun fact when you google around for knee bracing stuff you have a hard time avoiding medical knee braces. Even "post knee bracing" gave me stuff about what knee brace I should be wearing after surgery.

Thanks,
Richard
The green is what you walk on, at a height that allows you to work at the posts, install the beam and the rafters,
The brown in the picture is all bracing that you need whether you walk on it or not.

Yes we walk on scaffolding that is just nailed up as people have for hundreds of years and yes there are nail holes when we are done.



We always put sheeting on in the opposite direction from the the studs or joists or rafters. For a roof with 24"OC rafters you add H clips between the rafters

On a stress wall with horizontal cracks we are required to add solid blocking between the studs behind the crack, all specified to a certain design be the engineer on the site.
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Last edited by Nealtw; 08-09-2019 at 12:33 PM.
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