Basement - Building & Construction - DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum
Advertisement


Go Back   DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum > Home Improvement > Building & Construction

CLICK HERE AND JOIN OUR COMMUNITY TODAY...IT'S FREE!

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Display Modes
Old 09-09-2010, 11:41 AM   #1
Jordan83
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: Evergreen Park, IL
Posts: 32
Rewards Points: 27
Send a message via AIM to jordan83 Send a message via MSN to jordan83
Default

Basement


My wife and I just purchased our first home.
After living in it for 2 weeks we had a pipe break in the basement which everyone thought was a foundation leak.

After tearing the walls and wet carpet out we find out all the water has come from a pipe hidden behind a wall.

We found several foundation cracks and had them repaired and are now looking to finish the basment. There is a pic attached of one area.

I am looking to get a recomendation on what is the best way to insulate a basement.The old paneling was glued to the wall.

I am planning to drylock the walls in 3 weeks.

http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/4974519324/
Attached Thumbnails
Basement-man-cave.jpg  
jordan83 is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Old 09-09-2010, 12:01 PM   #2
Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: Near Charleston, SC
Posts: 106
Rewards Points: 79
Default

Where? Climate wise


You have some options obviously. Framing it up and using fiberglass and or foam sheeting is an easy way. Plus it allows for placement of electrical outlets and lighting not to mention deep window wells - especially if you use 2X6 framing. It's really a matter of what you prefer and purpose. There are also many wall coverings that range from 6 dollars on sale per board - up to 60 or more.
What will you be using the room for? Entertaining - parties - kids sleep overs? Or mere storage. Keep in mind tho that what you do will be sold one day (maybe not during the next presidency) but one day. So add some value and enjoy your new home.
__________________
If you don't have time to do it right, when will you ever have time to do it over?

Last edited by jackofmany; 09-09-2010 at 12:04 PM. Reason: TMI
jackofmany is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Old 09-09-2010, 01:11 PM   #3
Jordan83
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: Evergreen Park, IL
Posts: 32
Rewards Points: 27
Send a message via AIM to jordan83 Send a message via MSN to jordan83
Default


The room is going to be a TV room that connects to another room in the basement that is being setup as a spare room ( part office / part extra bedroom).

The basement can be damp at times so I am buying a dehumidifier but want to make sure the insulation i choose is the best for a below grade basement.
jordan83 is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Old 09-10-2010, 02:54 AM   #4
Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: Fairbanks, AK
Posts: 1,936
Rewards Points: 1,178
Default


Below grade means XPS, to me. No vapor barrier, but use a good air barrier, like caulked and gasketed sheet rock and a vapor retarding paint. That will let the wall breathe to the inside, as it can't (much) to the outside. Why is it damp? It would be in your best interest to find the reason and fix it, if practical, before you button anything up.
jklingel is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-10-2010, 07:37 AM   #5
Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: Near Charleston, SC
Posts: 106
Rewards Points: 79
Default


I was taking a close look at your photo and noticed a couple of things. You mentioned sealing the walls but what about the floor? Ideally JK's advice re fixing the source of dampness is best, but if thats not practical from a $ standpoint, You'll definately want to be concerned about future moisture problems if it's anything more than just occasional climate moisture. Remember - mold is some pretty creepy stuff and can cause all sorts of health problems.

Otherwise, if you have a basically tight basement that doesn't get "wet" or even excessively moist, you should be ok with dehumidifiers. Also - if you elect to stud this up and go with any sheet goods, It would be nice to know that the walls are definately going to stay dead dry. Floor as well.

Also, XPS is possibly going to be the best thing to go with. Read up on it though. Get a few words out about that floor too. And - If thats a window well or has any chance of being a water collecting area, you might want to take care of that real soon. What type soil do you have and is the land sloping away from the house all around the perimeter. If you get snow make a point of getting it away from your house as melting can play havoc on even the best seal-up jobs.
__________________
If you don't have time to do it right, when will you ever have time to do it over?
jackofmany is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-10-2010, 10:11 AM   #6
Jordan83
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: Evergreen Park, IL
Posts: 32
Rewards Points: 27
Send a message via AIM to jordan83 Send a message via MSN to jordan83
Default


We are in chicago and when the weather was in the 85 - 95 + degree weather on of the walls woud sweat as my wife keeps the AC in the low 70's. I closed the basement AC vents and cracked a window a bit to regulate the temp down there and it made a huge differance but was not so good for the AC bill. This was primarily on 1 wall that is almost entirely below grade.

The floor is a concrete floor and in the pic one of the old owners laid tile down on the floor. As you can see the tile did not settle well as the floor as shifter over the years. There has never been any water in that are and the basement does have a sub pump and french drain on 3/4 of the basement.

The old owner also thought it would be smart to use interior flat paint on the cement and floor of the basement. I have slowly been removing this so that I can do 2 things. 1 inspect the walls for any additional cracks and have them repaired and 2 drylock the baskement.

Any recomendations on the floor ? or removing the paint ?

The window is above grade and there is no window well there. There is a slight grade to the soil but not as much as I would like. I have also installed 6 foot gutter extenders on all of the gutters and on event doubled it to 12 feet. Next year I might do it right with PVC but for htis year the extenders will have to work.
jordan83 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-10-2010, 10:19 AM   #7
Jordan83
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: Evergreen Park, IL
Posts: 32
Rewards Points: 27
Send a message via AIM to jordan83 Send a message via MSN to jordan83
Default


Also I know the XPS would be for hte below grade portion of the basement but what about the wooden frame portion ?
Would I put the XPS up to that as well or would I put fiberglass in there ? The home is a frame house.

The one wall faces a heated addition so not much moisture or cold there but the side with the window is exterior facing.
jordan83 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-10-2010, 12:02 PM   #8
Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: Fairbanks, AK
Posts: 1,936
Rewards Points: 1,178
Default


Forget the fiberglass. Use cotton, rock wool, or cellulose batts in the walls. You can run XPS up all the way, but caulk and tape the edges to air seal. Or, fir out and use thicker batts, whichever is less hassle or $$, over the walls. Google ADA (airtight drywall approach; greenbuildingadvisor.com may have it laid out), too.
jklingel is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to jklingel For This Useful Post:
jordan83 (09-10-2010)
Old 09-10-2010, 03:41 PM   #9
Registered User
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Posts: 11,730
Rewards Points: 526
Default


Joint sealed foam board below grade, sill sealer under p.t. plate for thermal and capillary break, no air space to frame wall, NO Drylock (moisture will dry to interior or pool and leak at wall/floor joint), latex paint on floor is fine (permeable):

http://www.buildingscience.com/docum...gs?full_view=1
(updated version): http://www.buildingscience.com/docum...ent-insulation
http://www.greenbuildingadvisor.com/...-building-code

Don't forget the egress from basement and bedroom: http://www.aacounty.org/IP/Resources...ementGuide.pdf
http://illowaicc.org/uploadedFiles/I...20Openings.pdf

Gary
__________________
If any ads are present below my answer or words underlined/colored, I do not condone/support/use the product or services listed/linked to, they are there without my consent.
17,000 dryer fires a year, when did you last clean the inside of the dryer near motor or the exhaust ducting?

Last edited by Gary in WA; 09-10-2010 at 03:52 PM.
Gary in WA is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-10-2010, 04:16 PM   #10
Jordan83
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: Evergreen Park, IL
Posts: 32
Rewards Points: 27
Send a message via AIM to jordan83 Send a message via MSN to jordan83
Default


so no drylock ?

When you say sill sealer you mean this ? http://www.ebuild.com/articles/470010.hwx
Put this under the preasure treated wooden stud that is placed on top of the cement.

Also what about if I frame the room out so I can drywall it or would your do the wooden lats right to the foam board ?
jordan83 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-10-2010, 05:15 PM   #11
Registered User
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Posts: 11,730
Rewards Points: 526
Default


Yes, that is a sill sealer. Do a search, above, in the white box on orange for "drylock".
Either or, on the wall or strapping. Don't forget the rim joists bays: http://www.rd.com/57548/article57548.html

Gary
__________________
If any ads are present below my answer or words underlined/colored, I do not condone/support/use the product or services listed/linked to, they are there without my consent.
17,000 dryer fires a year, when did you last clean the inside of the dryer near motor or the exhaust ducting?
Gary in WA is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-10-2010, 05:51 PM   #12
Member
 
steveel's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Posts: 287
Rewards Points: 250
Default


Here's a slightly different take on your situation.... a lot of the stuff I read cautions against plunging into major changes as soon as you move in to a new place. Instead, they say fix what is essential, clean up and demo what is really ugly or unhealthy, and then.... cool it. Get the feel for the place. For one thing you could watch how your basement reacts to a full cycle of seasons, calling attention to any unexpected seasonal HVAC or moisture issues down there. Get a few humidity-meters and monitor them, weekly.

When you're really ready, Building Science Corp http://www.buildingscience.com/ has explored some interesting (but more expensive) approaches to those described in the other comments. Since you have a french drain around 3/4 of the foundation wall, that suggests there's a significant moisture source somewhere so its possible those pricier options would be best. The approach includes drain matting against the wall, topped by a heavy mil vapor barrier like they use in crawl spaces, and then insulating/wall building on top of that.

SteveEl
steveel is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-10-2010, 06:00 PM   #13
Member
 
steveel's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Posts: 287
Rewards Points: 250
Default


I forgot to mention radon.

Have you checked for radon (which is common naturally occurring carcinogen in basements)? If you have a radon problem your plan should provide for venting the basement.

Now here is some speculation.... I don't really know, but my common sense make me think before one does a radon test, one should do any caulking and air sealing against stack effect. Otherwise, can't the radon test return a false negative, if the building is sucking fresh replacement air into the basement to replace the warm heated air that leaks through upper parts of the house that aren't sealed?

Regardless, stack effect sealing is the first major change I do every time I move, just for HVAC and ice dam reasons.

SteveEl
steveel is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-11-2010, 08:38 AM   #14
Stairguy
 
Millertyme's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: New Bedford, MA
Posts: 737
Rewards Points: 508
Default


you might want to wait a little longer to see what problems exist, if any, in your basement. Seeing you just moved in, you might not see problems that you may see during the rainy season. One more thing, if the old owner installed a french drain recently, then there was probably a water issue. If the french drain flows into sump it might put a heavy load on the pump. Make sure it is a good one. A seperate pump with a battery backup is also a good idea.
Millertyme is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-11-2010, 12:50 PM   #15
Jordan83
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: Evergreen Park, IL
Posts: 32
Rewards Points: 27
Send a message via AIM to jordan83 Send a message via MSN to jordan83
Default


a back up pump is on my to buy list. I live right out side chicago and we had some major major rain out here. About 30 days of consist rainy days with one weekend dropping more than 6 inches of water. If I could insert a pic to a reply I would show you the pics from the 6 inches of rain weekend it was crazy.

When we did demo the basement I had US Water Proofing out to fix the foundation cracks and we have done a hose test on the repaired areas. We let the hose run for about 2 hours and not a drop.

Of all the walls there is only 1 that gets damp and it is onthe north side of the house.
The old owner painted the walls and floor with interior flat paint. Should I remove this ?

I know I am not going to do the whole basement this year but I am going to put the walls up that I tore down in the pic area.

I know the rim joist are not insulated. The guy I bought the house from stuff insulation in there and put up drywall.
jordan83 is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
At a crossroads in my basement project - waterproofing help needed callisto9 Building & Construction 37 07-06-2015 07:40 AM
How to solve problem of moist basement walls moist Building & Construction 4 08-30-2010 05:18 PM
Thoughts and ideas basement finishing and HVAC creamaster HVAC 1 03-10-2010 07:46 PM
Adding Subpanel for Basement - Few Questions mindle Electrical 28 01-07-2010 08:49 AM
Insulating basement ceiling - your recommendations? jtmann HVAC 8 11-24-2009 04:44 PM




Top of Page | View New Posts