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Old 09-22-2014, 08:13 PM   #1
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Attach Tapco Steel Adjustable Building Column to beam and bottom plate


Ok here goes with my second post ......

How would I attach one of these - Tapco Steel Adjustable Building Column -- http://www.tigerbrandjackpost.com/ad...e-columns.html ---- to the top to a steel W5X15 beam and at the bottom to a 2x4 bottom plate?

I can see welding it to the beam would work at the top perhaps or blots ???
At the bottom, bolting to the bottom plate, subfloor below that or do I need special brackets between the interface of the top and bottom of the beam and the respective surfaces?

I am attempting to get a permit and have had an engineer "design" me a beam. She has also come up with a way to build the columns in wood but then said, hey why not do this with steel columns, more expensive but perhaps easier to install???

Got this from the inter webs :::::

MONO POST

........
A beam plate or saddle plate is required at the top to secure the column to a support frame
An adjustable base set (check with your bldg inspector) or end plate (a.k.a. springfield plate) is required at the bottom to eliminate lateral movement.



See attachments. Comments on the connection diagram that was made for me - this was using 2x4 and straps so not directly related to my question - just looking for another option


Last edited by dropedBeam007; 09-22-2014 at 11:09 PM.
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Old 09-22-2014, 08:31 PM   #2
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As has been mentioned before this so called engineer should have speck all the fasteners and materials needed.
Does not matter what your budget is, want it done right, wait until you have the money to pay for real approved plans or risk it failing and dealing with a sagging and failing floor.
Any time I've done this job I've used LVL's and joist hangers. Whole lot easier then dealing with a steel beam.
As mentioned those supports on the ends of the beam need to supported all the way down to grade. Which would mean adding new footings.
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Old 09-22-2014, 09:26 PM   #3
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I was told that I don't need new footings. This wall rests on a big beam on the basement - a W8X16.

Can't someone just tell me how they'd do it. Don't worry you will not be legally held responsible. I'm trying to actually learn something here but having a hard time getting any info.
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Old 09-22-2014, 09:50 PM   #4
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You have what looks like a nice diagram, presumably prepared by a professional engineer under contract to you. Yet you want to ask an internet chat forum their opinion on how to connect a steel column (not specified by the engineer) to a steel beam on the top and a 2x4 plate on the bottom. So exactly what are you going to do with opinions and suggestions offered by a chat forum? Take a poll on how to make the connections and follow the most popular solution? Select one at random? Pick the solution that seems easiest for you to implement?

I don't understand what you are trying to accomplish. You have a perfectly good solution, presumably prepared by a registered professional engineer. Roll with it. If you want to do something different, get your engineer to draw up an alternate.
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Old 09-22-2014, 11:01 PM   #5
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dfsadfdsaf

Last edited by dropedBeam007; 09-22-2014 at 11:07 PM. Reason: byebye
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Old 09-22-2014, 11:15 PM   #6
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Really want tor rely on info from people that have never been on site and could be from any place on the planet and now idea what there talking about to save a few buck?
Yes this is a DIY forum but something's are just not DIY and as you have been told this is not one of them.
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Old 09-23-2014, 01:11 AM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dropedBeam007 View Post
At the bottom, bolting to the bottom plate,
wood plates can only support so much weight per square inch. this depends on the species and grade of lumber. when supporting a column on top of a wood plate you must make sure you have sufficient bearing area so as not to crush the wood fibers in the plate. this may require a metal plate to increase the bearing area of the column.

I did not see your drawing so I cannot make comment.
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Old 10-13-2014, 07:49 PM   #8
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I have a steel beam across my basement.I replaced two jack posts under it 13 years ago when I bought the house[the old jacks were rusted through,barely holding anything.
I didn't attach the posts to the beam,just stood them up there and screwed them tight.
maybe not the thing to do,but they're still there after 13 years. Oh-mine are on a cement paving brick at the bottom,set on a concrete floor.

Last edited by flhtcu; 10-13-2014 at 07:51 PM. Reason: add detail
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Old 10-13-2014, 09:46 PM   #9
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One good reason to attach a column to a beam is that in the event of an earthquake, an unconnected column can walk right off the beam. During an earthquake, large vertical and horizontal forces can occur, and in the worst case the beam moves upward, and a post which is not attached simply falls over. Illinois is not a high seismic area, but lots of areas in the U.S. are.
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