Add A 2nd Floor On Slightly Pitched Roof - Building & Construction - Page 2 - DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum
Advertisement


Go Back   DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum > Home Improvement > Building & Construction

CLICK HERE AND JOIN OUR COMMUNITY TODAY...IT'S FREE!

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Display Modes
Old 04-07-2016, 12:29 PM   #16
Newbie
 
Join Date: Apr 2016
Posts: 9
Rewards Points: 18
Default

Re: Add a 2nd floor on slightly pitched roof


Quote:
Originally Posted by Bud9051 View Post
It's not that the walls have to be removed, but as I mentally go through the process I can see sections of drywall needing to be removed for access to install electric, plumbing and heating. By the time your contractor messes around opening up sections as needed it would be faster and not all that more expensive to remove the ceiling and roof, and ceiling joists. Add to the existing walls to make the resulting floor level. Install full length "I-joists". Then the subfloor above. With the ceiling open all of the utilities can be easily reconnected or installed new and the walls and framing above can proceed.

I can't see an easy way, and it would be expensive.

If you leave the ceiling in place, how would they install the utilities for the second floor as the subfloor has to go in before the walls go up?

Bud
Utilities aren't to bad actually, not too much to do for access.

One access needed for the electrical sub-panel on the second floor. Then you feed the wires out from the sub panel.

Forced hot water heat, so you only need 2 1" holes for the in and out of the loop to and from the boiler. I still like copper, but it would be even easier with pex.

Similar for the plumbing. Place the bath above the existing bath, and you just have to go up through the ceiling in one spot for the drains, and the hot and cold water feeds. There is a bedroom closet right behind the current bathroom. It would be easy to give 1 sq foot to a drain, and then box it in. It would be out of the way, and the space wouldn't be missed.

But the amount of work opening the space for columns? How many columns would you need to support a beam along a 44ft wall? And is a beam across the middle needed with the 28ft width? Or will I-joists run 28ft?
02920diy is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Old 04-07-2016, 01:50 PM   #17
Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Posts: 17,158
Rewards Points: 6,652
Default

Re: Add a 2nd floor on slightly pitched roof


Lets not forget that the neighbors have first say, before the city council or county approves the license to build. You are really just dong a full blown remodel, because you are keeping the original home, but making it into a new home.

Once you find out how much it is going to cost with all of the permits, storage fees for all furnishings, having to rent an apartment or condo, while all of this work is going on, if you currently have a mortgage, you may not get approved for this second mortgage to do the house how you like it.

If it is on a crawl space, the existing footers may not be enough to carry all of that extra weight, since they were only made to support the one story structure.

Then lets not forget that when they start ripping off the roof, you are going to have a huge tarp or tent over the house, while all of this is done. Also add in any repairs that need to be done to the existing structure, if they start finding problems after opening up the attic area, you will not get a sub-panel, you will end up with a new panel and possibly having to get your service upgraded to handle the extra load.

Just because your boiler is using the smallest fuel nozzle, is not how it works in these matters. It may not be able to handle the upstairs and you may have to either go with Mini-Splits, or a whole new boiler upgrade and other equipment needed.

Right now it all sounds good. But when you figure in the amounts above the price per sqft, you would be better off selling and buying a larger home for your needs, which would save you more in the long run.

Lets not forget your age and if you are willing to take on the extra debt load if you are close or in your 50's and may not be able to afford the mortgage notes from this work.

The construction can be a guess of $60k in theory. It could actually end up costing you up to $300k, depending on what upgrades, who is hired, all of the repairs to the yard and landscaping, etc..



gregzoll is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to gregzoll For This Useful Post:
02920diy (04-07-2016)
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Old 04-07-2016, 01:58 PM   #18
Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Posts: 17,158
Rewards Points: 6,652
Default

Re: Add a 2nd floor on slightly pitched roof


Is it really worth it, since market values are still down in a lot of area, along with this will raise your property taxes higher then you may realize. http://www.bankrate.com/finance/real...2nd-story.aspx

Top five questions and answers on adding a second story. http://legaleaglecontractors.com/dan...ory-additions/

Article from the SFGate about this kind of work. http://homeguides.sfgate.com/expecte...se-102963.html



gregzoll is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Old 04-07-2016, 02:34 PM   #19
Newbie
 
Join Date: Apr 2016
Posts: 9
Rewards Points: 18
Default

Re: Add a 2nd floor on slightly pitched roof


Quote:
Originally Posted by gregzoll View Post
Lets not forget that the neighbors have first say, before the city council or county approves the license to build. You are really just dong a full blown remodel, because you are keeping the original home, but making it into a new home.
Neighbors shouldn't care, the lot is a couple of acres, no one close, and the house won't be oversized when done, of course you never know who might say what. Calling it a remodel is a good tip

Quote:
Once you find out how much it is going to cost with all of the permits, storage fees for all furnishings, having to rent an apartment or condo, while all of this work is going on, if you currently have a mortgage, you may not get approved for this second mortgage to do the house how you like it.
By not removing the existing roof, I was hoping to stay, and not put anything in storage.

Quote:
If it is on a crawl space, the existing footers may not be enough to carry all of that extra weight, since they were only made to support the one story structure.
So there might be x number of footings needed to be poured depending on columns needed?

Quote:
Then lets not forget that when they start ripping off the roof, you are going to have a huge tarp or tent over the house, while all of this is done. Also add in any repairs that need to be done to the existing structure, if they start finding problems after opening up the attic area, you will not get a sub-panel, you will end up with a new panel and possibly having to get your service upgraded to handle the extra load.
I have a rubber roof now. I don't care if its left on. Or even pulled up after the new roof is dried in. Not sure why I would need a new panel, not just a sub panel. My current panel is maxed out anyway, so I need a sub if I want to add anything else.

Quote:
Just because your boiler is using the smallest fuel nozzle, is not how it works in these matters. It may not be able to handle the upstairs and you may have to either go with Mini-Splits, or a whole new boiler upgrade and other equipment needed.
No worries if I need a another boiler. I'm oil fired with no gas service near me, & due to oil to gas conversions, I can get a decent boiler on craigslist for a good price.

Quote:
Right now it all sounds good. But when you figure in the amounts above the price per sqft, you would be better off selling and buying a larger home for your needs, which would save you more in the long run.

Lets not forget your age and if you are willing to take on the extra debt load if you are close or in your 50's and may not be able to afford the mortgage notes from this work.

The construction can be a guess of $60k in theory. It could actually end up costing you up to $300k, depending on what upgrades, who is hired, all of the repairs to the yard and landscaping, etc..
All valid concerns, thank you. I'm trying to address how I have considered them in my answers, let me know if those are not valid methods.
02920diy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-07-2016, 03:08 PM   #20
Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Posts: 17,158
Rewards Points: 6,652
Default

Re: Add a 2nd floor on slightly pitched roof


You are more than welcome to ask questions about this. But really as all of us are stating, is that there is no way anyone on the Internet knows what the work will involve, including the fact that you are going to be dealing with a whole neighborhood of other home owners and property owners, that if there is only ranches, they could object to the addition.

You are really better off selling and buying a new home. Now of course there is a way to get around the whole new build, as long as you just leave one or two walls up from the original house, if your Building license office and the county board or city council approves after your fellow citizens have been given their chance to voice their opinion.



gregzoll is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-07-2016, 03:09 PM   #21
Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Posts: 17,158
Rewards Points: 6,652
Default

Re: Add a 2nd floor on slightly pitched roof


What you are planning on doing, the roof has to come off of the structure. There is no way to get around it. Also with the plumbing stack, just adding a new bath sounds great. But because the current one is for venting, that means you have to figure a way to vent both baths, and still stay within code with the proper plumbing.

Like I stated before, this is not going to sound good when you go to the bank and find out that there are going to be specific requirements for that job, because it will be their home for them to invest with, until you pay off the loan(s) and get the deed in your hands.




Last edited by gregzoll; 04-07-2016 at 03:13 PM.
gregzoll is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-07-2016, 09:16 PM   #22
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: MD/DC area
Posts: 376
Rewards Points: 172
Default

Re: Add a 2nd floor on slightly pitched roof


I realize that many things building related vary by locality, but I've never heard of having to get permission for a remodel or addition from wither the mortgage company or their neighbors.

Yes, if you were borrowing money for the addition I'd expect a lender to review the plans for that. And I have heard of lenders placing restrictions of house with obvious defects (I have a friend that bought a house with a half finished kitchen, his mortgage company required him to use licensed contractors for everything, couldn't even hang cabinets or paint himself. But after that was finished, he took on many others projects himself.) Maybe I should re-read my mortgage paperwork, I'm pretty sure I can legally undertake any addition on my house I get a permit for.

In my town, neighbors would be informed and given a chance to comment if a variance is requested. If the plans fall within existing zoning requirements they get approved by the county and then the city.
LanterDan is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 04-07-2016, 11:52 PM   #23
Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Posts: 17,158
Rewards Points: 6,652
Default

Re: Add a 2nd floor on slightly pitched roof


Banks have gotten really picky in the past 15 years when it comes to construction mortgages. It is their property and they have the say in their investment, until you pay off the loans. Once paid off, then it is yours.

The bank can come back and state what they want the contractor to do if they are not satisfied with the workmanship. They can also put a stop work order on it, if a sub is not doing their job and the bank wants them to do it as spec'd in the call out and on the plans.

As for the other red tape, it is government bureaucracy. Anything your county/parish decides on this job. They can request a hearing for it, then vote at the next meeting on any variances and re-classification of the project.

Our city and county has a committee that goes through every permit request, regardless if it is commercial, industrial, ag or residential. If you decide to build bigger and your lot is not zoned for it. It can put delays on the project.

All that I can say is get everything written up and drawn up by an architect. Since you live on a lot that is decent and could probably get away with living in a trailer on site, while the work is going on. That puts you in a good position that you are always there making sure that the job gets done, even if it takes 4 months to frame the addition and fix the older section, just to make sure that it lasts a long time.

Just make notes by copying from the posts, look through some of the other project builds in the project showcase, to see if there is anything in any of the builds that you would like to do.

There is a 1 to 2 story build in there that another regular did. The best project that has had the best interest is the German House Rebuild.



gregzoll is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Reply


Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Cut into portion of garage pitched roof to make a deck. netsockets Roofing/Siding 1 04-19-2013 01:12 AM
rubber roof over tar & thoughts on quote wfmrules3 Roofing/Siding 13 10-16-2011 09:00 PM
Roof leak nightmare..... it won't stop amandat37 Roofing/Siding 52 04-22-2011 12:47 PM
Unfinished garage/ ceiling joist under low pitched roof betto825 Building & Construction 8 12-17-2010 06:16 PM
Replace the roof or not??? Leaked only once when it snowed chasqui Roofing/Siding 10 04-13-2010 10:02 PM




Top of Page | View New Posts