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Old 04-05-2016, 02:23 PM   #1
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Add a 2nd floor on slightly pitched roof


I have lots of questions about adding a 2nd floor to my house. It isn't going to be a DIY project, but I want to know as much as I can before talking to contractors.

My existing house is pretty basic. 29'x64' including the garage, but the part I'd like to build above will be 29'x44, stopping before the garage. 2x4 walls, and the floor and roof are both 14' 2x10's that overlap in the middle of the house. It is a shed roof, well, it has one slight pitch to the back of the house, will have to measure, but I'll say its a foot drop from the front to back 29'.

Its a bummer that it has a pitch, or that roof would make a fine floor :/ Ceilings are connected right too it, so it can't easily be disturbed to make it level.

Right now, I would just want it dry on the 2nd floor. I can DIY any finishing, and just having storage would be a huge plus.

So how complicated of a job is this going to be?

Easiest approach seems to be ordering gambrel room-in-attic trusses, then I guess the low side needs to be built up so they are level?

But that leaves a bit of sq ft that could be usable space.
So I suppose it would be a bit more work but a fake gambrel would maximize the space, not look much difference but COSTS???? The floor would still have to be leveled on the 2nd floor.

Thanks all. Nothing but questions here, and looking for some input
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Old 04-05-2016, 02:25 PM   #2
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Re: Add a 2nd floor on slightly pitched roof


This is what I meant by a 'fake gambrel.' Something like this:
http://www.libertynaturepreserve.com...malladjust.jpg
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Old 04-05-2016, 04:08 PM   #3
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Re: Add a 2nd floor on slightly pitched roof


Ho 029,
You will essentially be building a ranch on top of your existing house. Are you ready for the $60,000 investment (just a rough estimate)? Even a little at a time, it will be that much.

With an improvement of this size you need to have the plans drawn by an architect so the builder will have something to follow and the town will have something to approve, the building permit. Without the plans in advance you are at the mercy of your contractor. You may also want to get the approval of your bank if you have a mortgage as they are essentially the owners of the house.

Bud
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Old 04-05-2016, 09:17 PM   #4
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Re: Add a 2nd floor on slightly pitched roof


We have no pictures, no plans, no location, how would anyone be able to even guess?
Need to be dealing with someone local and hope they they have there ducks in a row to get this dried in ASAP so it does not destroy anything below
Just need storage then adding a garage or shed would be far cheaper.
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Old 04-06-2016, 11:36 AM   #5
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Re: Add a 2nd floor on slightly pitched roof


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We have no pictures, no plans, no location, how would anyone be able to even guess?
Need to be dealing with someone local and hope they they have there ducks in a row to get this dried in ASAP so it does not destroy anything below
Just need storage then adding a garage or shed would be far cheaper.
Honestly the house is as basic as the description, I didn't think a pic was needed, but here you go. Front to back, there is a 1ft drop, front ceiling is 8ft high, back ceiling is 7ft. inside is about 28ft wide.
It has a rubber roof on it now, if it can't be left on, it could be pulled up after the rest is dried-in so there is some leeway in the ASAP nature.

To get the same amount of storage space (1200sq) out of a garage, I assume it would be the same expense for the wood part of the building, plus the cost of clearing the land, and the cost of a slab.

I'm in RI. I appreciate the perspectives. Like I said, I'm trying to gather info before approaching someone local.
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Old 04-06-2016, 11:39 AM   #6
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Re: Add a 2nd floor on slightly pitched roof


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Ho 029,
You will essentially be building a ranch on top of your existing house. Are you ready for the $60,000 investment (just a rough estimate)? Even a little at a time, it will be that much.

With an improvement of this size you need to have the plans drawn by an architect so the builder will have something to follow and the town will have something to approve, the building permit. Without the plans in advance you are at the mercy of your contractor. You may also want to get the approval of your bank if you have a mortgage as they are essentially the owners of the house.

Bud
Thanks, I didn't think about the mortgage company. Good tip there
60 wouldn't be bad. You thinking that for just the dry-in? or the other work finishing too?
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Old 04-06-2016, 11:54 AM   #7
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Re: Add a 2nd floor on slightly pitched roof


Hi 029,
When you ask for bids, ask for both your approach and removing the entire ceiling and creating 8' walls all the way around. I have a friend who build a home the way he wanted and ignored how others might view it. Cost him a bundle when he sold. That sloped ceiling on the inside with a makeshift gambrel above will be less than desirable for many. And the cost of removing the roof and creating a traditional 2-story may not be all that bad.

A framing crew would be fast and you could be dried out in a week. Let the crew go ahead and restore the downstairs and leave the upstairs for you.

Remember, electrical, plumbing, and heating will all need to be extended or inlarged to handle the added space.

Bud
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Old 04-06-2016, 12:24 PM   #8
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Re: Add a 2nd floor on slightly pitched roof


Dry-in will be less and how much for the rest depends upon what is going up there, bathrooms, windows, flooring. But a new furnace, plumbing, electrical (maybe a new panel and new service entrance) all new roof, it will be expensive. Builders develop ballpark numbers like $85 a sq ft. You won't need a foundation, but in some areas, $85 is low. I roughly used $50 and that is low for a finished job. How much you can do and how much that will save is unknown.

In years past dealing with banks, they wanted ALL work to be done by an established contractor as they have been stung too many time being left with a half finished house. And they don't want to wait more than a few months.

Having been a contractor one of the aspects of making improvements is to establish the before and after value of the home. Then compare that increase to the cost of improvements. In your case, IMO, you will be making a huge investment, both time and dollars, and see only a part of that added to the finished home. There are some web sites where you can see what an expansion adds to the value, some are good and others are terrible.

Lots to consider.

Bud
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Old 04-06-2016, 04:07 PM   #9
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Re: Add a 2nd floor on slightly pitched roof


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Originally Posted by Bud9051 View Post
Hi 029,
When you ask for bids, ask for both your approach and removing the entire ceiling and creating 8' walls all the way around. I have a friend who build a home the way he wanted and ignored how others might view it. Cost him a bundle when he sold. That sloped ceiling on the inside with a makeshift gambrel above will be less than desirable for many. And the cost of removing the roof and creating a traditional 2-story may not be all that bad.

A framing crew would be fast and you could be dried out in a week. Let the crew go ahead and restore the downstairs and leave the upstairs for you.

Remember, electrical, plumbing, and heating will all need to be extended or inlarged to handle the added space.

Bud
Man, I don't disagree, but I have an aversion to upsetting the house too much. Personally, the low end of the ceiling only bothers me in the kitchen, but there is a nice 8ft slider taking up most of that space. I could see a compromise situation where just the kitchen ceiling is raised, as that is where it would have most impact, but the other rooms don't bother me.

For heat, the boiler should be good for the added space, right now I have it running on the smallest nozzle, so I should have room to go up with it, and the pipe has a capped additional zone t. Electrical I'd have an electrician put in a sub box upstairs, and I'd go from there. I'd get a pro to plumb the drains on an upstairs bath.

But taking cost/return in value, would it make most sense to just go with an room-in-attic truss? There would still need to be space made for windows, which would just be framed otherwise, and add to costs...

Thanks for the input!
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Old 04-06-2016, 04:19 PM   #10
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Re: Add a 2nd floor on slightly pitched roof


What type of foundation do you have and are you sure it will take a second story ? It may just be your sketch, but it makes me ask the question.
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Old 04-06-2016, 05:01 PM   #11
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Re: Add a 2nd floor on slightly pitched roof


In my neck of the woods adding a second story (assuming the foundation and first floor walls will handle a second story) would run between $80-130 a square foot. Could even be higher depending on the level of finishes.

If you want real numbers get off of the internet and get local bids.
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Old 04-06-2016, 05:22 PM   #12
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Re: Add a 2nd floor on slightly pitched roof


Sell it and buy a bigger house.
There is no easy or cheap way to fix this issue. Especially as a DIY.
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Old 04-06-2016, 05:39 PM   #13
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Re: Add a 2nd floor on slightly pitched roof


Thanks Kwik, in the range I was afraid of, been awhile. And 029, your walls and existing ceiling can't be used as is as part of the addition.

In line with jl's post, what you have is a functioning home and can sell as is. If you have a substantial equity, then applying that to another home with the space you want would be a lot easier.

Those replying here could DIY what you are wanting, and most would not try, I wouldn't. I always make sure what I build will be desirable to everyone looking in the future, because that future comes along a lot faster than we think.

As for the truss top instead of a second floor, less expensive, but half the space.

Not to pry, but do you have cash for this or were you planning to get a loan? Going for a loan would require a detailed presentation from that experienced builder and would probably need to be a completed package. But, you would need to be starting with a very low or no mortgage on what you have.

Bud
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Old 04-07-2016, 10:42 AM   #14
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Re: Add a 2nd floor on slightly pitched roof


Quote:
Originally Posted by Oso954 View Post
What type of foundation do you have and are you sure it will take a second story ? It may just be your sketch, but it makes me ask the question.
Poured foundation. Goes down at least 4ft. For lack of measuring, it seems a standard width. The crawl space is at least 3ft too, very easy to move around in.

Quote:
Originally Posted by kwikfishron View Post
In my neck of the woods adding a second story (assuming the foundation and first floor walls will handle a second story) would run between $80-130 a square foot. Could even be higher depending on the level of finishes.
If you want real numbers get off of the internet and get local bids.
Thanks! Doing my homework before go looking for buds.

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Originally Posted by jlhaslip View Post
Sell it and buy a bigger house.
There is no easy or cheap way to fix this issue. Especially as a DIY.
Location! It would be easier to try and talk me into leveling this one and starting from scratch

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bud9051 View Post
Thanks Kwik, in the range I was afraid of, been awhile. And 029, your walls and existing ceiling can't be used as is as part of the addition.

In line with jl's post, what you have is a functioning home and can sell as is. If you have a substantial equity, then applying that to another home with the space you want would be a lot easier.

Those replying here could DIY what you are wanting, and most would not try, I wouldn't. I always make sure what I build will be desirable to everyone looking in the future, because that future comes along a lot faster than we think.

As for the truss top instead of a second floor, less expensive, but half the space.

Not to pry, but do you have cash for this or were you planning to get a loan? Going for a loan would require a detailed presentation from that experienced builder and would probably need to be a completed package. But, you would need to be starting with a very low or no mortgage on what you have.

Bud
Cash depends on how what gets done and how high it creeps, and what I want to dip into. Money is still pretty cheap to borrow, so either way, borrowing wouldn't be bad if the extras you mention drive up costs too much.

So the existing walls can't be used, then is it columns in the walls to support beams across the front, back and middle? Then its just build on that?
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Old 04-07-2016, 11:11 AM   #15
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Re: Add a 2nd floor on slightly pitched roof


It's not that the walls have to be removed, but as I mentally go through the process I can see sections of drywall needing to be removed for access to install electric, plumbing and heating. By the time your contractor messes around opening up sections as needed it would be faster and not all that more expensive to remove the ceiling and roof, and ceiling joists. Add to the existing walls to make the resulting floor level. Install full length "I-joists". Then the subfloor above. With the ceiling open all of the utilities can be easily reconnected or installed new and the walls and framing above can proceed.

I can't see an easy way, and it would be expensive.

If you leave the ceiling in place, how would they install the utilities for the second floor as the subfloor has to go in before the walls go up?

Bud
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