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Old 01-05-2010, 09:35 PM   #1
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wiring for kitchen outlet


I live in toronto, Canada. One thing that boggles my mind, is that today, kitchen counter top outlets are wired 12-2 with 20 amp breakers.

I want to put some counter top outlets but i want to know if by code i can still put a 14-3 split or do i have to put a 12-2 by code?
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Old 01-05-2010, 09:57 PM   #2
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Quote:
Originally Posted by humberguy View Post
I live in toronto, Canada. One thing that boggles my mind, is that today, kitchen counter top outlets are wired 12-2 with 20 amp breakers.

I want to put some counter top outlets but i want to know if by code i can still put a 14-3 split or do i have to put a 12-2 by code?
For the answer to that question you will have to consult a DIY member who is familiar with the latest edition (in effect) of The Canadian Electrical Code. And the local AHJ (Authority having Jurisdiction) I'm sure all of Metro Toronto is governed by the same ruling Authority. But here in the USA the Electrical wiring rules are governed by the National Electrical Code (NEC) which is used as a basis for all the other regional Code enforcing authorities, who adopted it in varying forms. So the rules are definitely different than those of the Canadian Authorities. !

Last edited by spark plug; 01-05-2010 at 09:59 PM. Reason: substituted term for clarity
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Old 01-05-2010, 10:01 PM   #3
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My counter top microwave is 1100 watts, toaster is 850w, toaster oven is over 1000w......etc etc
So basically with a 15a I could only use one item at a time on a circuit
I use 20a more because of todays appliances then required by US code
I have (3) 20a circuits with a 4th in the eating area
I may even add a 5th when the kitchen is remodeled



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Old 01-05-2010, 10:06 PM   #4
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Don't know the codes in Canada but the US you need a GCFI somewhere on your countertop circuits and why not spend the money for 12 gauge wire? Why do you need whatever/3 if you are just stringing outlets anyhow? Two strand and the ground wire should be fine?

Frig and major appliances should not be on the same circuit as your countertop appliance outlets.
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Old 01-05-2010, 10:11 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Scuba_Dave View Post
My counter top microwave is 1100 watts, toaster is 850w, toaster oven is over 1000w......etc etc
So basically with a 15a I could only use one item at a time on a circuit
I use 20a more because of todays appliances then required by US code
I have (3) 20a circuits with a 4th in the eating area
I may even add a 5th when the kitchen is remodeled
Dave is right to add more than the code minimum, espically if you use your kitchen to do alot of cooking and want to be efficient. The Code is not written to be efficient its written to be reasonably safe.
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Old 01-06-2010, 07:25 AM   #6
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thanks alot guys, ill go with the 12-2.
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Old 01-06-2010, 08:16 AM   #7
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JOED can confirm, but IIRC CEC called for split wired receptacles in the kitchen. Hence the reference to 12-3 cable.
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Old 01-06-2010, 08:33 AM   #8
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Originally Posted by humberguy View Post
thanks alot guys, ill go with the 12-2.
One GFCI on your circuit too please even if not code required. Could save your life standing barefoot and making toast some morning. Well worth the money. Even retail a nice GCFI on the front of the whole circuit will only set you back $20US?
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Old 01-06-2010, 03:52 PM   #9
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couldn't agree more. go with 12-2 and GFI. note that adjacency rule no longer applies in ontario (it was ruled useless).

some additional info:

your fridge needs its own receptical and can not be shared with anything.

above counter recepticals near water need GFI (but we agreed you'd do this anyway).

any eating area in your kitchen need their own unshared receptical.

plan for under cabinet lighting to run off house wiring sytem (not batteries) if you want this feature, controlled switch from the wall too.

hard wired dishwashers are tricky because the breaker must be "lockout" type.

don''t be surprised if 40% of your breaker panel is consumed by your kitchen

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Old 01-06-2010, 04:38 PM   #10
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Yes you can run 14/3 to a kitchen plug, but that plug has to be further then 1.5M from a sink. Anything within 1.5M of the sink has to be GFI and has to be a 20A. I agree with the other posters to go with 20A for everything.

I personally like the idea of 14/3, with 14/3 you get two different circuits with 30A available to use. So you can plug in two high draw appliances in one plug with no problem, if you do this with the 20A plug you may end up tripping the breaker.
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Old 01-06-2010, 04:45 PM   #11
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I alternate circuits...so every 2' is a different 20a circuit
That means you have 40a available in a 2' area instead of only 30a
With 3 or 4 circuits I will have plenty of power
I'm planning 3 circuits on one side, then a 4th on the other side + an outlet shared from one of the 1st side circuits
Then the adjoining Dining rm & Sunroom each have at least one 20a circuit



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Old 01-06-2010, 05:30 PM   #12
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Kitchen counter receptacles in Ontario are allowed to be either 20 amp or 15 amp split receptacles. However, if within 1.5 meters of the sink, they must be GFCI. So 20 amp is the better option there(although not required), since GFCI breakers are needed for splits and are very expensive. The 20 amp circuit receptacle must be T slot 20 amp.
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