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Old 08-18-2014, 08:13 AM   #1
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Wiring Bedrooms


I have heard that bedrooms now require a special arc proof breaker and all bedrooms need to be on their own circuit. Could someone please explain the breaker issue and how this differs from a regular ground fault breaker? Also if I wire each of the two bedrooms on its own 20 amp circuit how many outlets can I have with a ceiling fan with built in light. The fan with light will be the only device in each room other than the power outlets.

Thanks
JM
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Old 08-18-2014, 08:33 AM   #2
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You will probably need an AFCI for the bedroom circuits. Google it or the pros will come in and explain exactly what it does.

I have never hears that bedrooms need to be on own circuits.

All living areas should have outlets every 8 feet. There really is no maximum amount.

Also, do not forget (like me) that the outlets should be tamper resistant.

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Old 08-18-2014, 09:39 AM   #3
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The breaker you need is an arc fault breaker. It looks for arcing in the circuit from a loose connection. Unless your local area has a special rule each bedroom does not need a separate circuit.

The receptacle spacing rules are no more than 12 foot between, not 8'. There are other parts of the rule commonly called the 6/12 rule.
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Old 08-18-2014, 10:53 AM   #4
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One 20 amp circuit for two bedrooms will be more than adequate. In fact, a 15 amp circuit for two bedrooms is often adequate.
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Old 08-18-2014, 12:23 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by brric View Post
One 20 amp circuit for two bedrooms will be more than adequate. In fact, a 15 amp circuit for two bedrooms is often adequate.
Thanks to all for the replies. I may have misunderstood what I was previously told and he really said that bedrooms have to be on separate circuit meaning more than one. Each bedroom will only have a ceiling fan/light combo and the required number of power outlets. Are the arc fault breakers in question the following numbers: For Square D brand QO 120CAFI QO 120AFIC These are
20 amp.
Some one else told me that now a duplex two plug standard power outlet is counted double meaning if you are limited to 12 power outlets per circuit then only 6 double plugs can be used.

Thanks
JM
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Old 08-18-2014, 12:41 PM   #6
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The NEC does not place a limit on receptacles on a circuit in a residential setting.
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Old 08-18-2014, 12:41 PM   #7
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Quote:
if you are limited to 12 power outlets per circuit
Who said you are limited to 12 ?
This isn't Canada.
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Old 08-18-2014, 12:43 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ddsrph View Post
Thanks to all for the replies. I may have misunderstood what I was previously told and he really said that bedrooms have to be on separate circuit meaning more than one. Each bedroom will only have a ceiling fan/light combo and the required number of power outlets. Are the arc fault breakers in question the following numbers: For Square D brand QO 120CAFI QO 120AFIC These are
20 amp.
Some one else told me that now a duplex two plug standard power outlet is counted double meaning if you are limited to 12 power outletsing per circuit then only 6 double plugs can be used.

Thanks
JM
Whoever you talked to may have been citing local ordinances. Check with your local authorities.
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Old 08-18-2014, 02:33 PM   #9
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The limit of receptacles per circuit is in Canada only.
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Old 08-18-2014, 02:54 PM   #10
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Thanks, I will double check and see if it is something local about the number being limited to twelve. In a few hours I will be drilling thru the block wall and placing a three inch diameter pvc pipe to act as a pathway thru block wall for the 2 1/2 inch conduit. I need to have it in right place and want to find out if I am placing box in some area in violation of code. It is in a room we are calling the den, with no water anywhere near. The box is a
Square D 30 space 40 circuit measuring 14 by 30 inches. I am placing it so the center of the box is at a height of five and one half feet above floor. It is near corner of room about 14 to 15 inches to the right of a window, nothing above or below except bare wall. Are there any issues here? Is being 14 to 15 inches from edge of window any problem etc? The block wall will be filled with concrete is why I am placing the 3 inch pvc to hold the space while filling block cavity.

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Jim Miller
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Old 08-18-2014, 02:58 PM   #11
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Is this for your service panel? If so the highest breaker can be no more than 6'-7" to the center of the highest handle.

How do you plan to secure each cable to the panel when they go through the nipple?
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Old 08-18-2014, 04:22 PM   #12
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Quote:
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Is this for your service panel? If so the highest breaker can be no more than 6'-7" to the center of the highest handle.

How do you plan to secure each cable to the panel when they go through the nipple?
Jim
It will be the service panel for a small 1200 sq house. I will be Ok as the main breaker will be just above 5 1/2 feet and the others below that. The nipple will enter box above and to the right of the main breaker. I don't know about securing the cables once inside the box but the knock out I will be using is intended as a possible nipple entry point and will allow a easy connection to the main breaker. The box will be between the room corner and a window. Are there
Any code issues with that? It will be about 14 inches to the right of window and 3 inches to the left of corner wall. I could move it closer to window to have about nine inches from both window and wall.

Thanks
JM
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Old 08-18-2014, 05:53 PM   #13
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I thought you were talking about the branch circuits entering the panel. Now it sounds like the service conductors into the panel.

Are you using conduit or a service cable?
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Old 08-19-2014, 05:27 AM   #14
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I thought you were talking about the branch circuits entering the panel. Now it sounds like the service conductors into the panel.

Are you using conduit or a service cable?
Jim
It will be a underground service. The meter base will be on outside wall five and one half feet above grade. The panel will be directly behind meter but about four foot lower, with the bottom of panel below grade. The power cable from meter base will come down wall about two to three feet and enter thru block via a nipple into back of panel. I will have to,use one or two LB,s from meter base. Overall a very simple set-up. My questions were pertaining to location of the main service panel in relation to window and corner wall. I have drilled thru block and placed a 3 inch diameter piece of white PVC to hold the block filling concrete opening for the 2 1/2 inch nipple. I placed this hole to center the panel nine inches from both the window and corner wall. The main breaker will be about 5 feet and 10 inches above the slab floor. In the attached photo the main panel and meter base will be on left corner of building between corner and window.

Thanks
JM
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Old 08-19-2014, 07:11 AM   #15
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As long as the panel has at least a 30- wide workspace and the panel door opens 90 degrees or more you sound good. Think of an area the size of a refrigerator box in front of the panel as the workspace. No other utilities should be in the workspace.
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