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Old 03-09-2010, 08:12 AM   #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by busman View Post

For the wire size, your electrician was probably assuming you would use a nipple to attach the panels and individual wires. You would not have the 60 degree limitation in this case. By using SE cable, you are limited to 60 degrees.

Mark
So what should I do to correct this?
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Old 03-09-2010, 08:18 AM   #17
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Quote:
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So what should I do to correct this?
the easiest an cheapest thing to do would be to remove all 4 conductors from one end, install a short pvc nipple between the two panels and reinstall the conductors.

Your #1 Al XXHW will then be rated for 100 amps.

PS Upon removing the conductors remove the remaining 6" of SER sheathing before inserting them through the nipple.
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Old 03-09-2010, 08:20 AM   #18
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Abs777 View Post
So what should I do to correct this?
Sorry, I missed your post.
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Old 03-09-2010, 08:25 AM   #19
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Quote:
Originally Posted by brric View Post
the easiest an cheapest thing to do would be to remove all 4 conductors from one end, install a short pvc nipple between the two panels and reinstall the conductors.

Your #1 Al XXHW will then be rated for 100 amps.

PS Upon removing the conductors remove the remaining 6" of SER sheathing before inserting them through the nipple.
Sorry busman, I missed your post #12.
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Old 03-09-2010, 08:36 AM   #20
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Quote:
Originally Posted by brric View Post
the easiest an cheapest thing to do would be to remove all 4 conductors from one end, install a short pvc nipple between the two panels and reinstall the conductors.

Your #1 Al XXHW will then be rated for 100 amps.

PS Upon removing the conductors remove the remaining 6" of SER sheathing before inserting them through the nipple.
So I just remove the main sheathing and let the wires be individual and it will be ok? PVC instead of metal?
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Old 03-09-2010, 08:38 AM   #21
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While your installation is not technically code compliant,

A: it is not dangerous
B: it is likely your inspector doesn't know the difference

I deal with inspectors that would pass a similar set-up using #2 Al SER.

I also deal with inspectors that allow #8 NM on 50 amp breakers.
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Old 03-09-2010, 08:39 AM   #22
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Abs777 View Post
So I just remove the main sheathing and let the wires be individual and it will be ok? PVC instead of metal?
Personally I would use pvc.
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Old 03-09-2010, 09:19 AM   #23
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I don't know what I am going to do. I would like to leave it, but it would be nice to know that it is done correctly.

What does the ratings mean (60, 79, 95C)?

Is it acceptable if they are individual wires because in the sheath they are so tight against each other?
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Old 03-09-2010, 09:23 AM   #24
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Removing the conductors from the sheathing is not code compliant. Although the conductors are in fact XHHW, they will not meet the marking requirements of 310.11.

I admit I'm being picky, but code is code.

Mark
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Old 03-09-2010, 09:25 AM   #25
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Quote:
Originally Posted by busman View Post
Removing the conductors from the sheathing is not code compliant. Although the conductors are in fact XHHW, they will not meet the marking requirements of 310.11.

I admit I'm being picky, but code is code.

Mark
You are correct.
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Old 03-09-2010, 09:28 AM   #26
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Abs777 View Post
I don't know what I am going to do. I would like to leave it, but it would be nice to know that it is done correctly.

What does the ratings mean (60, 79, 95C)?

Is it acceptable if they are individual wires because in the sheath they are so tight against each other?
It is a contentious and to many of us crazy interpretation.

Those are the celsius temperature ratings of conductors and terminals.

Is this installation going to be inspected?
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Old 03-09-2010, 09:50 AM   #27
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Quote:
Originally Posted by brric View Post
It is a contentious and to many of us crazy interpretation.

Those are the celsius temperature ratings of conductors and terminals.

Is this installation going to be inspected?

No, I wasn't going to have it inspected.
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Old 03-09-2010, 10:12 AM   #28
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You could just remove the 100 amp breaker and install a 70 amp (If you can find one)? Then you would be compliant.

The inspector will see this as plain as day. As soon as he sees the cable between the two panels his interest will peak. You should have used a nipple and the correct wire. This is not a compliant installation.
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Old 03-09-2010, 10:30 AM   #29
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So I guess I have the following options.

1. Leave it.

2. Buy a nipple, adapters, and seperate the wires.

3. Buy a nipple, adapters, and new wire and redo it. What wire do I need for 100 amp?
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Old 03-09-2010, 10:41 AM   #30
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#3 Cu
thw,
thwn,
xhhw,
thhn,
etc.


#1 Al

thhw,
thw,
thwn,
xhhw
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