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Old 04-20-2010, 04:15 PM   #1
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Why get it inspected?


Why should you pull a permit and get the work inspected?

A good electrical (or any other type) inspector finds the little things you may have missed, such as forgetting to add the green ground screw to a metal ceiling light/fan box and suggesting you add that and toss on a pigtail before you power up the room.

He did, and so did I, and I thanked him for pointing it out to me.
He then complimented me on my overkill and excellent work on everything else.

Always pull your permits folks, and be patient with those poor souls, (the inspectors) they have very hard jobs. Ask any one of them! I'm sure they all have some excellent horror stories to tell! Po)

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Old 04-20-2010, 07:59 PM   #2
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Unpermitted/Not inspected electrical work can bite you when you go to sell your house. Buyers/Realtors are routinely checking that permits were pulled and asking that electrical systems are wired to code as a condition of sale.

Sometimes you can get an electrical contractor to certify the installation is to current code, but you will pay for it. I just got done inspecting a unpermitted panel change that was undoubtably installed to code 20 years ago. Unfortunately, it doesn't meet today's code so $700 later (to the seller) it's been updated by me. A permit pulled 20 years ago would have alleviated the cost.

PS. It's relatively easy for a homeowner to pull a permit and have it inspected in my jurisdiction.
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Old 04-20-2010, 08:02 PM   #3
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Failure to pull permits and get inspections as required in your city may result in your home insurance not covering you.
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Old 04-20-2010, 08:24 PM   #4
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I never get stuff inspected... but I probably should. I have not done any huge projects though, think the biggest involved running a line from the panel to the dishwasher. Did stuff like change receptacles, add new light sockets in the basement etc.

Should even small stuff like this be inspected?

Eventually I want to replace my whole panel, so that is something I will definably get inspected, same for when I decide to run the sub panel to the garage. At the same time I can always get them to check the small stuff too. When they inspect, do they give you some kind of document to certify it?
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Old 04-20-2010, 08:40 PM   #5
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Old 04-20-2010, 08:48 PM   #6
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Old 04-20-2010, 09:34 PM   #7
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Old 04-21-2010, 11:30 AM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jupe Blue View Post
Unpermitted/Not inspected electrical work can bite you when you go to sell your house. Buyers/Realtors are routinely checking that permits were pulled and asking that electrical systems are wired to code as a condition of sale.

Sometimes you can get an electrical contractor to certify the installation is to current code, but you will pay for it. I just got done inspecting a unpermitted panel change that was undoubtably installed to code 20 years ago. Unfortunately, it doesn't meet today's code so $700 later (to the seller) it's been updated by me. A permit pulled 20 years ago would have alleviated the cost.

PS. It's relatively easy for a homeowner to pull a permit and have it inspected in my jurisdiction.
It did not have to meet today's code.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Red Squirrel View Post
I never get stuff inspected... but I probably should. I have not done any huge projects though, think the biggest involved running a line from the panel to the dishwasher. Did stuff like change receptacles, add new light sockets in the basement etc.

Should even small stuff like this be inspected?

Eventually I want to replace my whole panel, so that is something I will definably get inspected, same for when I decide to run the sub panel to the garage. At the same time I can always get them to check the small stuff too. When they inspect, do they give you some kind of document to certify it?
I have to agree with you Red. Not all work requires an inspection.
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Old 04-21-2010, 12:02 PM   #9
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It depends on the city, our spark inspector does absolutely nothing. I would rather not pull a permit if I don't need to.
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Last edited by Clutchcargo; 04-21-2010 at 12:07 PM. Reason: clarification
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Old 04-21-2010, 07:15 PM   #10
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Out of curiosity is there a checklist that can be used to determine whether or not one should get an inspection? I realize this is up to AHJ but is there a rule of thumb?
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Old 04-21-2010, 07:55 PM   #11
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One rule I can think of would be any type of structural changes made to any existing building.
Codes seem to vary from state to state as to who can do what where with electric, plumbing, gas pipes, etc.

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Old 04-21-2010, 09:23 PM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DangerMouse View Post
Why should you pull a permit and get the work inspected?

A good electrical (or any other type) inspector finds the little things you may have missed, such as forgetting to add the green ground screw to a metal ceiling light/fan box and suggesting you add that and toss on a pigtail before you power up the room.

He did, and so did I, and I thanked him for pointing it out to me.
He then complimented me on my overkill and excellent work on everything else.

Always pull your permits folks, and be patient with those poor souls, (the inspectors) they have very hard jobs. Ask any one of them! I'm sure they all have some excellent horror stories to tell! Po)

DM
And for another reason,too. As Poster Leah Frances pointed out that (H. Frbd.) in the event of a fire, one of the first things the Insurance co. will look for, is whether the job had a permit and was inspected and approved. Otherwise they will wiggle out of paying!
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Old 04-21-2010, 09:42 PM   #13
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Where does one get a building permit or find a building inspector in a given municipality? I have had my boiler, hot water heater and roof replaced by hired contractors, all reputable, well established and have never seen a building permit or inspector at my house.
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Old 04-21-2010, 09:45 PM   #14
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Old 04-21-2010, 11:28 PM   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by J. V. View Post
It did not have to meet today's code.



I have to agree with you Red. Not all work requires an inspection.

When permitting an old installation today it does have to meet current code. In the eyes of my AHJ it's as if the install happened today and not 20 years ago and so is subject to today's standards.

I don't agree with Red. Any alteration to an electrical system requires a permit and thus requires inspection. It's in our state statutes and I can be subject to fines and/or revoking of my license if I don't permit electrical work. Plus if a homeowner doesn't permit/inspect work and there is a fire, you can bet the insurance company will not pay.
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