What's The Minimum Gauge Wire Required To Run 9volts 50 Feet? - Electrical - Page 2 - DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum
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Old 07-28-2010, 11:13 AM   #16
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Damn, just re-read over the part about neutral doing double duty. Pretty damn good reason to put them all on the same circuit, which these alarms are most certainly not...hmm. Some of these alarms are not in areas where it'll be easy to run 120...

Wireless might be an option if I can find one that is hardwired and doesn't look absolutely horrid for the main floor hallway.

Well crap.
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Old 07-28-2010, 11:47 AM   #17
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Quote:
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Is that 30 gauge cable? Does two conductor mean two 30awg cables?
http://www.radioshack.com/product/in...LAID=107598743

I don't know if anyone makes two conductor twisted pair #30 cable. We used to put two single conductors in a drill bit and twist them ourselves.
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Old 07-28-2010, 11:57 AM   #18
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I had to put hard wired in to sell my last house
912 sq ft...3 bedrooms....so 4 alarms within 15' of each other
New owner took them all down except the one in the main bedroom
Heat was by wood stove - they went off all the time...very loud

Yeah - I ran all of mine on the same circuit
I was unaware that the neutral did 2x duty
It was just easier since I was running form one SD to the next



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Old 07-28-2010, 05:00 PM   #19
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Red Squirrel, you're way behind the times

$12 will buy you an interconnectable smoke detector, which is required in most municipalities.
Really, for residential settings? Never seen those in regular stores like Walmart, Canadian Tire or Home Depot. To me it makes sense they would have em, but I've just never seen any other then commercial grade fire alarm systems.
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Old 07-28-2010, 05:26 PM   #20
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Quote:
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Really, for residential settings? Never seen those in regular stores like Walmart, Canadian Tire or Home Depot. To me it makes sense they would have em, but I've just never seen any other then commercial grade fire alarm systems.
May not have been looking carefully enough. They don't really advertise it as a feature, since it's a requirement almost everywhere. Pretty much all 120V smoke detectors on the market have three wires. Home Depot and some Walmarts definitely sell them.

Commercial fire alarm systems are often "addressable", which means the central controller can tell exactly which unit is alarming, and check the operational status of all the individual units. These residential detectors don't do that, they just have a single wire that externally triggers them to alarm.
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Old 07-28-2010, 09:11 PM   #21
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Many HUD certified homes utilize a single 18 gauge wire to handle the interconnection of smoke alarms. I believe they consider it to be a "Class II" conductor, meaning it can be installed as a stand-alone wire. It only carries 9volts DC on it as you may already know.
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Old 07-29-2010, 01:03 PM   #22
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Too bad there's no way to just run two 18awg wires to handle the neutral between them.
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Old 07-29-2010, 02:10 PM   #23
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Quote:
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Too bad there's no way to just run two 18awg wires to handle the neutral between them.
can't do. Since those wires connect to the actual neutral, whatever you used would have to conform to all the requirements any other power conductor would; proper voltage rating, proper type of insulation, proper installation,

the whole shebang!!
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Old 07-29-2010, 03:11 PM   #24
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Post an intended wiring diagram [not a schematic]. The actual voltages and currents are getting a bit fuzzy.
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Old 07-29-2010, 03:14 PM   #25
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Quote:
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Post an intended wiring diagram [not a schematic]. The actual voltages and currents are getting a bit fuzzy.
I don't think it's the voltages getting fuzzy.
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Old 07-29-2010, 03:17 PM   #26
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This thread makes my brain hurt.
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Old 07-29-2010, 03:26 PM   #27
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Quote:
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I don't think it's the voltages getting fuzzy.
High BAC makes for fuzziness.
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Old 07-29-2010, 03:27 PM   #28
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Quote:
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Post an intended wiring diagram [not a schematic]. The actual voltages and currents are getting a bit fuzzy.
We are talking about a standard hard-wired residential smoke alarm operating at 120 volts and powered by a 15 or 20 amp circuit.

No need for schematics. The OP has been told what the options are. Running another conductor outside of the current wiring method is not an option.
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Old 07-29-2010, 03:30 PM   #29
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Yoyizit View Post
Post an intended wiring diagram [not a schematic]. The actual voltages and currents are getting a bit fuzzy.
*shakes his head* Unfortunately the wiring diagram will now be very simple, if I can do it at all. It'll be a straight circuit of 14-3 from the box to each smoke detector in succession.

I've a feeling you're asking about the wiring diagram of the smoke detector, and modifying it so that the neutral line from the alarm signal is routed through another wire, rather than shunting it off to the AC line's neutral. While I imagine this is very possible, I'll be using different alarms, and that's a bit more complicated than I plan to get in this upgrade. I like the thought though, considered it myself, if only very briefly.

Proby, aye. I'll add a notice to the OP to summarize the thread.

At this point I'm just going to see if I can run a line alongside a doorway to the stairs going down. I might be able to pull this off after all.
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Old 07-29-2010, 03:35 PM   #30
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Fox View Post
I might be able to pull this off after all.
There is
what works,
what is safe,
what can work to some level of certainty and
what the NEC says.
There is some overlap between these categories.

Where the current of some magnitude flows goes a long way toward answering this question, and this question is probably answered by a wiring diagram.

At least, por favor, post what you finally decided on.

Last edited by Yoyizit; 07-29-2010 at 04:07 PM.
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