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Old 01-06-2010, 07:39 PM   #16
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Ah, that means it does not have it built in
That's an expensive install to buy a 240v GFCI
I bought a programmeable thermostat w/GFCI built in - but 120v
--mine is low voltage

Woops - wait a minute
I don't think MFG has a CLUE what they are talking about

Quote:
Per U.S. National Electrical
Code – Installation in a bathroom requires that the
Thermostat / Equipment Ground Fault Protection
Device be installed on a circuit protected by a
separate Ground Fault Current Interrupter (GFCI).
(2) GFCI's ???
That doesn't make sense
Am I reading that right ?



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Old 01-06-2010, 07:43 PM   #17
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Scuba_Dave View Post
Ah, that means it does not have it built in
That's an expensive install to buy a 240v GFCI
I bought a programmeable thermostat w/GFCI built in - but 120v
--mine is low voltage

Woops - wait a minute
I don't think MFG has a CLUE what they are talking about



(2) GFCI's ???
That doesn't make sense
Am I reading that right ?
Yes. you're reading it right. It says it has built in protection but still wants on a GFCI protected circuit.
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Old 01-06-2010, 07:45 PM   #18
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Scuba_Dave View Post
(2) GFCI's ???
That doesn't make sense
Am I reading that right ?
I went there too and read the same thing. You're right Scube! Can't have 2 GFCI's on the same circuit...
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Old 01-06-2010, 07:58 PM   #19
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jerryh3 View Post
This T-stat also has built in GF protection, but I believe any floor cable heating system requires GFCI protection for the entire circuit-424.44(g).
The way I read that it says GFI protection for the cables. It says "provided for cables installed in floors". The branch circuit would not be installed in the floor so I think the T-stat could provide it.
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Old 01-06-2010, 08:00 PM   #20
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Quote:
Originally Posted by warmsmeallup View Post
I went there too and read the same thing. You're right Scube! Can't have 2 GFCI's on the same circuit...
Technically, you can. It may work fine, or it may not. It all depends on the leakage current each one detects. That fact that they are in "series" should have no bearing on their operation.
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Old 01-06-2010, 08:02 PM   #21
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jim Port View Post
The way I read that it says GFI protection for the cables. It says "provided for cables installed in floors". The branch circuit would not be installed in the floor so I think the T-stat could provide it.
What if someone came behind and replaced the thermostat with one that did not have built in protection?
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Old 01-06-2010, 08:06 PM   #22
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jerryh3 View Post
What if someone came behind and replaced the thermostat with one that did not have built in protection?
I think that would fall under the same issue as replacing a GFCI in the kitchen that protects the circuit

You can't prevent someone from doing something in the future that violates code



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Old 01-06-2010, 08:07 PM   #23
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jerryh3 View Post
Technically, you can. It may work fine, or it may not. It all depends on the leakage current each one detects. That fact that they are in "series" should have no bearing on their operation.
Ok, but why bother? and, if you do get nuisance trips, who fixes it, the mfr who recommended it or the installer....we all know the answer to that one!
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Old 01-06-2010, 08:10 PM   #24
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Originally Posted by Scuba_Dave View Post
I think that would fall under the same issue as replacing a GFCI in the kitchen that protects the circuit

You can't prevent someone from doing something in the future that violates code
True. This is why I think each AHJ will have it's own interpretation and enforce it differently. Just one of things to seek clarification about before starting the job.
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Old 01-06-2010, 08:12 PM   #25
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Ok, but why bother? and, if you do get nuisance trips, who fixes it, the mfr who recommended it or the installer....we all know the answer to that one!
I never said it was a good idea. Just doable. I can hear the call now: "I'm sorry sir, any problems relating to the installation of our system will have to be addressed to the installer."
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Old 01-06-2010, 08:30 PM   #26
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Originally Posted by jerryh3 View Post
What if someone came behind and replaced the thermostat with one that did not have built in protection?
I am sure someone might be able to do this, but the ones I have seen also had terminals for the leads from the heat sensor. Installing a t-stat say for a baseboard heater would not have the input from the heat sensor.

Like Dave says there is only so much the original installer can do. After we leave all bets are off.
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Old 01-06-2010, 08:42 PM   #27
 
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For your information Warmsmeallup I was doing something at work and could not reply right away. For the rest of the people that really want to help I purchased the 240v warm tiles system for my basement but have not installed it yet and was thinking about going to the 120v. I have wired outlets before. The homeowner before has an 120v outlet coming from the junction box that also goes to the dryer. Not sure if it is legal or not but the home inspector never said anything to me about it. I can still return the 240v for the 120v, I was just asking it is was possible to run two 120v to make one 240v but obviously it is not according to the feedback I have receive. I would like to thank you all for the positive and negative feedbacks.
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Old 01-06-2010, 08:47 PM   #28
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You can run a 240v system
BUT you need it on a seperate breaker
Most likely you would need to get rid of that outlet
Depends upon how exactly it is all wired

BUT, If its off the 30a dryer breaker it needs to be removed - against code & possible fire hazard



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Old 01-06-2010, 08:50 PM   #29
 
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Not sure if the 240v would be worth the effort now because the basement has a drywall ceiling. Could I run a 120v from a regular outlet to the 120v thermostat?
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Old 01-06-2010, 08:53 PM   #30
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It all depends upon the power draw of the system
A 240v system for "x" area might take 6a
The same system running at 120v would need 12a

If it requires a lot of amps then it needs a dedicated circuit



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