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Old 01-28-2010, 03:50 PM   #16
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The only real reason to put in a recepticle "ground-up" is for safety. If an object should fall on the wire and partially pull it out, then the ground would be partially exposed, not the hot and neutral. THis would prevent electrocution, should you (or your child) should be unlucky enough to grab the hot leads.
Not true. You have a 50/50 chance of hitting the ground and hot at the same time.
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Old 01-28-2010, 03:54 PM   #17
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Not true. You have a 50/50 chance of hitting the ground and hot at the same time.
What happens if it falls on from the neutral side ?

Seems to me you have multiple possibilities of what it hits:
Ground only
Ground & hot
Hot only
Ground & neutral
neutral only
& for something flexible: hot, ground & neutral



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Old 01-28-2010, 04:00 PM   #18
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Not true. You have a 50/50 chance of hitting the ground and hot at the same time.

Note sure I follow.... If something drops, from above, or if someone tugs on the cord by stepping on it (the most common way I think you can partially expose the cord) only the top of the cord connection will be exposed from the wall. Since the ground is on top, this is the only part that is exposed.

Maybe I need to draw a picture....

Here's one....

http://www.electricianla.com/images/99b.jpg

Pretend that hand is not there. If this was a grounded outlet and the ground is on the bottom, you have a potentially dangerous situation. If it is ground-up, only the ground is exposed.

Last edited by gbwillner; 01-28-2010 at 04:04 PM. Reason: added pic
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Old 01-28-2010, 04:27 PM   #19
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the only way it would provide any benefit is if something were laid across the recep from above. This would cause the object to contact the ground terminal first and so then if it fell to the hot side, it would short out.

in all reality, that is not really any safer than if something fell from the top (with the ground down) since it would most likely also strike the neutral prong as well, and short out.


It would provide no more safety one way or the other if a child were to stick a knife in from the side. there is no more chance he would hit the ground whether it were up or down.


so, since most 90 plugs are designed so the ground is down (that I have seen), I suggest that is the most proper installation.
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Old 01-28-2010, 04:44 PM   #20
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The way I have always heard it told:

Normal ground down: ground prong is fully in..but top 2 prongs are slightly out due to tension on cord
So hot & neutral exposed

Ground up, same thing but now only the ground is exposed





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Old 01-28-2010, 05:11 PM   #21
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but now that the earths magnetic field is moving, and faster than ever before, some fear it is the early stages of a flip of the magnetic field of the earth. would that mean you have to go around and flip every recep already installed based on your justification if the fields do flip?
Yes, I had considered the coming reversal/change in the earths magnetic poles nessitating the alteration of zillions of receps. When it occurs it will create a lucrative new business opprotunity... Shhh, don't tell anyone by get rich idea.
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Old 01-28-2010, 05:33 PM   #22
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The NEC is silent on the issue of which way is 'correct." I have heard/read somewhere that the ground pin is up in hospitals because it is longer than the other two and will still be grounded in the event the cord comes loose and a wire or object falling from above shorts the circuit. This seems dubious to me, but who knows?

I always put them in ground pin down, but it isn't required by the NEC.
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Old 01-28-2010, 06:35 PM   #23
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I use the hemisphere rule:
  • Northern hemisphere = gound down
  • Southern hemisphere = ground up
This way the ground is properly polerized with the earth's rotation.

Naw try UK or French receptales all the ground pin are up postion but once a while it will be fliped around but not really widespread.

However in USA / Cananda it don't matter which way the ground is.

Typically I use the ground pin down for resdentails unless switched receptales then I flip it around.

Commrecal pretty much standarized ground pin up.

Merci,Marc
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Old 01-28-2010, 06:45 PM   #24
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I was always shown first thing on is ground last thing off is ground when working electrical. so for me ground down means it's the last to come out which gives what protection there is to be had in a failing plug. imo
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Old 01-28-2010, 09:16 PM   #25
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Quote:
Originally Posted by vsheetz View Post
Yes, I had considered the coming reversal/change in the earths magnetic poles nessitating the alteration of zillions of receps. When it occurs it will create a lucrative new business opprotunity... Shhh, don't tell anyone by get rich idea.
Hey, I made my millions when Indiana went to following DST. Apparently nobody knew how to change a clock (or you would have thought so as much as they whined about DST) so I started a clock resetting service. I'm busy as all get out twice a year but then I have 50 weeks of vacation between.
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Old 01-28-2010, 09:21 PM   #26
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The NEC is silent on the issue of which way is 'correct." I have heard/read somewhere that the ground pin is up in hospitals because it is longer than the other two and will still be grounded in the event the cord comes loose and a wire or object falling from above shorts the circuit. This seems dubious to me, but who knows?

I always put them in ground pin down, but it isn't required by the NEC.

I considered that in my suggestion. There is such a small benefit to think something falling would have that much better chance to hit the ground and the hot over the same thing dropped across the hot and neut that it is, as you said, a dubious claim at best.
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Old 01-29-2010, 11:07 AM   #27
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I work in a hospital and can confirm that ground is always up, but yeah normally I install ground down. The odds of an conductive object falling perfectly on is rather slim.
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