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Old 06-08-2010, 03:31 PM   #1
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Tripped Circuit Breaker


My microwave is positioned above my stove.My toaster is plugged into the receptacle next to the stove.When I use both simultaneously the circuit breaker trips.Any ideas why this happens?
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Old 06-08-2010, 04:23 PM   #2
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The circuit is overloaded.
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Old 06-08-2010, 05:30 PM   #3
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Yup, my toaster takes at least 850w & it isn't even that big
Both together exceed the circuit capacity

*edit* actually mine does not exceed 2400w, it exceeded 1500w, tripped the surge that I had both plugged into



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Old 06-08-2010, 06:07 PM   #4
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IIRC, any fixed appliance should be on it's own circuit. In your case, the microwave (i'm assuming permanently mounted above stove) should've been on it's own circuit.

In this case, its clear they are on the same circuit.

Take wattage of toaster plus wattage of microwave, divide by 120, gets you amperage.
eg: 850W toaster + 1500W microwave = 2350W / 120V = 19.58A.

If your kitchen circuits are 20A like it should be, then you are border line maxed out. Appliance startup amps are generally higher. Also circuit breakers are only nominally 20A, almost never exactly 20.000A.
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Old 06-08-2010, 07:53 PM   #5
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In a similar situation at least one forum member used a heavy, short extension cord to pick up power for one of the appliances from a nearby outlet that was on a different breaker.
16 gauge cord is rated for 13A but I'd probably go with 14 gauge. If you have AFCIs they may trip if the cord becomes damaged.
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Old 06-10-2010, 03:52 PM   #6
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Tripped Circuit Breaker


This is why its required, and good, to have 2 dedicated electrical circuits to the kitchen counter, 1 circuit for garbage disposal, and 1 for the dishwasher. Hope this helps.

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Old 06-10-2010, 04:57 PM   #7
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How difficult would it be to run a new wire from the circuit panel to either one of those two outlets?
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