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Old 02-25-2009, 08:57 AM   #1
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Tool question


I'm almost too embarrassed to ask but what are screwdrivers with a bent shaft intended for? http://www.mytoolstore.com/ideal/ide12-16.html
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Old 02-25-2009, 09:01 AM   #2
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They swivel. They are used mostly to run the screws for switches and receptacles. I usually use my drill, but my offset screwdrivers are great for locating obstacles before I cut a box in.
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Old 02-25-2009, 09:12 AM   #3
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yup, the handles swivel and act as a 'brace and bit' sort of.

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Old 02-25-2009, 11:23 AM   #4
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The screwdriver's shaft spins in the handle. With a little practice they become a very valuable tool.
They're great for doing finish work...Installing devices into the boxes and cover plates specifically.
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Old 02-25-2009, 11:52 AM   #5
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Back in the day we called them "yankee" screwdrivers. Time saver on trim out.
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Old 02-25-2009, 01:43 PM   #6
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a wobbler!!! absolutely have to have this on a trim out. i always thought a yankee screwdrive was one that spun automatically when you push on it.

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Old 02-25-2009, 06:57 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jcalvin View Post
a wobbler!!! absolutely have to have this on a trim out. i always thought a yankee screwdrive was one that spun automatically when you push on it.

Man... that brings back memories... the first and last time I saw one of those was in my Grandfather's toolbox. Awesome tool for pre-battery operated drivers/drills.
Thanx!
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Old 02-26-2009, 07:57 AM   #8
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Thanks for all the input! I can see what they're used for but I'm still having trouble picturing why they're better than a straight shaft. Maybe I should just buy one and find out.
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Old 02-26-2009, 08:18 AM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PirateKatz View Post
why they're better than a straight shaft
LOTS easier on the wrists!!! it's a crank.... no twisting necessary.
i too have those 'yankees' shown above in my shed.... i guess that dates ME, huh? roflmao

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Old 02-26-2009, 08:25 AM   #10
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I'll date myself too. I've never seen one of them before (is it a torture device?). But, I do have a small battery powered screw driver to save my wrists during installations. Maybe this just proves I'm a girl.
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Old 02-26-2009, 08:47 AM   #11
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Try one PirateKatz, you'll love it.
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Old 02-26-2009, 09:14 AM   #12
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I think I can picture it now. I'm going to buy one and try it out (I have a certain obsession with buying tools anyways).

On the subject of making things easier on the hands/wrists... Are there any tools to aid in twisting wire nuts? I spent the weekend changing fluorescent ballasts, adding junction boxes, and just cleaning up some really bad wiring in the addition to my house (I had no idea how much of a mess it was, since I always assumed it was properly done because they pulled a permit back in the 70's).

And my hands were absolutely killing me afterwards. Are there any kind of socket adapters meant for wire nuts? I don't know how an electrician can possibly wire an entire house and not be in agony and/or suffer from early onset arthritis.
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Old 02-26-2009, 09:25 AM   #13
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find an old socket (nut-driver even better) a bit larger than the wirenuts to be used. roll a piece of duct tape around the opening for cushioning. use drill or cordless screwdriver on slow speed. problem solved.

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Old 02-26-2009, 10:42 AM   #14
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Wago Wal-Nuts are a good alternative for traditional wire nuts, especially for folks with sore fingers! They're a bit more expensive though.
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Old 02-26-2009, 10:51 AM   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jcalvin View Post
a wobbler!!! absolutely have to have this on a trim out. i always thought a yankee screwdrive was one that spun automatically when you push on it.

Yes, you are right. The picture is the yankee. It's been a long time my friend.
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