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Old 06-12-2010, 12:41 PM   #16
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To the OP, #4 is larger than #6. Number 4 would not require any more protection than the #6.
Not what I read in the code section I reference above, but maybe I'm not interpreting it correctly.

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If you are going with a conduit to feed the new panel there are fittings to make tight turns into the house. An LB is one type. You could also rerun the cable outside and turn in just above the top of the panel instead of coming in where the cable does now.
I appreciate the info.

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Permits and inspections will be required before the power is restored.
Absolutly. I go by the book.
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Old 06-12-2010, 03:17 PM   #17
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If you are referencing 250.53 E it means you never have to run larger than #6 to a rod.
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Old 06-12-2010, 04:45 PM   #18
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If you are referencing 250.53 E it means you never have to run larger than #6 to a rod.
I'm referencing 250.64(B). In my case, the ground conductor will exit just above the foundation wall about 20" above grade where it will travel down the wall to the ground rod. I would say that in this case it would be subject to physical damage along the wall, so a #4 would need to be protected, while a #6 just needs to be fastened to the wall. Any thoughts?
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Old 06-12-2010, 04:50 PM   #19
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I protect every wire running down the house
I used #4 solid in my pool cabana to the ground rods & put in pvc until underground maybe 12"+
Electrician did the same when he ran the grounding rods for my house



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Old 06-12-2010, 05:10 PM   #20
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The #4 only requires protection if subject to damage. The #6 can be bare if fastened to the building,and if not subject to damage. The #6 requires one of the methods listed if subject to damage. The #4 still has to be secured to the building surface.

There is an armored #6 available.
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Old 06-13-2010, 07:53 PM   #21
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cable looks terrible and is not "to code". It needs to be secured and not simply free hanging like that.
So what's actually not to code? Would providing support 1/2 way to the panel help? I'm really starting to lean toward not replacing that cable if possible, so I'm looking for suggestions on how to bring it up to code.
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Old 06-13-2010, 09:36 PM   #22
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So what's actually not to code? Would providing support 1/2 way to the panel help? I'm really starting to lean toward not replacing that cable if possible, so I'm looking for suggestions on how to bring it up to code.
and I thought we had you convinced to turn this into a pro quality job.

Oh well, sometimes you just hope for legal.

Put an appropriate strap within 12 inches of the panel and then at least every 4 1/2 feet there after.


an inspector could ding you on what is called "workmanship quality" which means an inspector can enforce a reasonably neat installation. Most don't or aren't that picky. They do tend to take poor quality in their justification for having to inspect more than they would if everything they say was of good quality work.

I have had inspectors come into my job, shake my hand, ask what I did and put a green sticker on my work. They do that because they know me, my quality of work, and what they could see by standing there looking around was quality work and they felt no need to look further.

If my work looked like crap, they might have looked at everything I did. Poor quality work showing is generally indicative of poor quality of work in areas not immediately visible.
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Old 06-13-2010, 11:41 PM   #23
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and I thought we had you convinced to turn this into a pro quality job.
Now you make me feel bad.

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Put an appropriate strap within 12 inches of the panel and then at least every 4 1/2 feet there after.
If I keep the cable, that's what I'll do. It's only 3 feet, so 1 or 2 straps should do it.

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an inspector could ding you on what is called "workmanship quality" which means an inspector can enforce a reasonably neat installation.
If I clean everything else up other than the service cable it would look alot better. I'm just not sure if I can get myself to put out the extra $ for new cable and conduit when this one is technically sufficient. I don't know... I still have time to decide.
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Old 06-14-2010, 08:10 AM   #24
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Hey, don't feel bad. I have actually seen worse



Just make it as right as you can. I understand the $$ thing all too well.
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Old 06-18-2010, 10:18 PM   #25
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I'm convincing myself to replace the cable from the meter. I plan to use 2/0 copper conductors in 2" conduit. Should be plenty of capacity based on the 40% max fill rule. I'll drop from the meter about 3 feet, 90 bend to the right, LB connector into the house and then finally a 90 bend down right into the top of the panel. This should clean things up alot. I couldn't see a pvc locknut at the store. Would I just use a metal lock nut to fasten the conduit to the panel?

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Old 06-19-2010, 08:16 AM   #26
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Metal locknuts are used with PVC male adapters.
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Old 06-19-2010, 09:41 AM   #27
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Where's the picture?
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Old 06-19-2010, 10:25 AM   #28
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Where's the picture?
I must have somehow messed it up and lost it. I took a new one. Since I took the first one, I've relocated the drain line that runs behind the panel so that it no longer runs directly over the 'dedicated space'.
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Old 06-20-2010, 07:37 AM   #29
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Dryer cable - No ground?


Just noticed that 10/3 cable to dryer doesn't have a ground. Will re-hooking this wire up to the new panel be an issue with code/the inspector? That cable ain't cheap. I'd have to replace about 35-40 feet if necessary.
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Old 06-21-2010, 02:46 PM   #30
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does it need 120 and 240? if not, just use one of the coated wires as a ground. If you need to add a ground, add just 1 wire. you can go down in size for a ground, so even 12 gauge would be fine.
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