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Old 12-22-2018, 06:58 PM   #1
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Simplisafe Video Door Bell


Well, since tech support is busy and won't answer lets ask the questions here.

Bought a Siplisafe with video doorbell replacement. Kinda like a Ring video system.

My existing is a single old school mechanical with transformer reading 19 VAC at the button. It is not digital.

I have replaced the existing doorbell button with the Simplisafe doorbell base but as soon as I slide on the Simplisafe doorbell it starts ringing the doorbell constantly. I have looked at the Simplisafe forum which is quite confusing and the thread I'm reading has the same trouble with the old mechanical system I have.

There are some digital questions thrown into the same thread which really confuses the issue.

The "fix" from the forum I have read is a resistor at the chime across the TRANSFORMER and FRONT terminals. I have tried a 10 Ohm, a 100 Ohm and a 1K Ohm. The 10 and 100 ohm sounded the chime constantly as if the button was pushed. The 1K ohm didn't sound the chime when installed but didn't fix the issue when I installed the button.

Simplisafe's "fix" is to send a chime connector.


RING has a Pro Power Kit
Quote:
Hi Tom, Your Ring Video Doorbell Pro requires the Pro Power Kit to function. A Pro Power Kit is a small device that makes sure that enough power is sent to your Ring Doorbell to function. Bilan J., Customer Satisfaction Specialist [email protected]



Answered by Ring 4 months ago
NEST has a chime connector



It seems all of these fixes are to boost the power to the button in order to power the camera, LED and chime.

My question is what could these mysterious devices be? Are they a designed circuit? Just a cap with a resistor? The Ring device appears to be non polarity sensitive and installs in parallel. The Nest inline.

Thoughts?
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Old 12-23-2018, 03:42 AM   #2
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Re: Simplisafe Video Door Bell


Ok for starters there's no "old school" doorbells out there. Doorbells come in 2 flavors : pure electromechanical or electronic.

The simpli doorbell is designed to work with an electromechanical system

So let's review how a traditional electromechanical system works. You have a transformer that supplies 24vac. One side is connected to the chime one side to the front button and the other side of the front button is connected to the other side of the chime.

The chime is a coil. The button has a little 24vac light in it.

At rest power is flowing through the system because the light is wired across the button terminals. However the light is a high resistance device so little current flows. Not enough to develop enough magnetic pull in the coil to pull the solenoid to bang on the chime.

When the button is pressed now full transformer power is applied to the chime solenoid the solenoid bangs the first chime. The user releases the button and a spring in the chime slams the solenoid back and bangs on the other chime.

When you replace the button with the video doorbell it is also a high resistance device (not as high as the incandescent light but still high) so a little more current flows but still not enough current to trigger the solenoid. It is enough current to power the battery charger in the doorbell and keep the wifi radio in the doorbell connected to the wifi router.

When you press the video doorbell button the full transformer power is applied to the chime solenoid the same as before. The video doorbell then stops taking power from the circuit and starts using it's internal battery.

There are 3 bad things with the traditional doorbell. First the transformer is powered all the time and uses enough power that over a years time it adds up. Second the chime uses a lot more power and because the chime is mechanical it has parts that wear out and it is more expensive to make.

So they then started putting in electronic doorbell systems. These use a lot less power. SO much less power that the chime will trigger when a video doorbell is connected because even thought the doorbell only allows a small amount of current to flow, it is enough to trigger the doorbell chime.

My recommendation is you first start by taking apart your chime and making positively sure that it is indeed electromechanical with the solenoids. Then next you find the doorbell transformer and make sure it's supplying 24vac. NOT dc!!! AC. Fix those 2 things and the doorbell will probably start working.
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Old 12-23-2018, 09:24 AM   #3
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Re: Simplisafe Video Door Bell


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Originally Posted by tmittelstaedt View Post
Thank you for the time you took to describe the action of a "normal" doorbell and for the ins and outs of other devices.

Hopefully, others less knowledgeable might read, mark learn an inwardly digest your words of wisdom.

While I hope, I often have reason to doubt.

Good luck
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Old 12-30-2018, 12:14 PM   #4
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Re: Simplisafe Video Door Bell


Quote:
Originally Posted by tmittelstaedt View Post
Ok for starters there's no "old school" doorbells out there. Doorbells come in 2 flavors : pure electromechanical or electronic.

The simpli doorbell is designed to work with an electromechanical system

So let's review how a traditional electromechanical system works. You have a transformer that supplies 24vac. One side is connected to the chime one side to the front button and the other side of the front button is connected to the other side of the chime.

The chime is a coil. The button has a little 24vac light in it.

At rest power is flowing through the system because the light is wired across the button terminals. However the light is a high resistance device so little current flows. Not enough to develop enough magnetic pull in the coil to pull the solenoid to bang on the chime.

When the button is pressed now full transformer power is applied to the chime solenoid the solenoid bangs the first chime. The user releases the button and a spring in the chime slams the solenoid back and bangs on the other chime.

When you replace the button with the video doorbell it is also a high resistance device (not as high as the incandescent light but still high) so a little more current flows but still not enough current to trigger the solenoid. It is enough current to power the battery charger in the doorbell and keep the wifi radio in the doorbell connected to the wifi router.

When you press the video doorbell button the full transformer power is applied to the chime solenoid the same as before. The video doorbell then stops taking power from the circuit and starts using it's internal battery.

There are 3 bad things with the traditional doorbell. First the transformer is powered all the time and uses enough power that over a years time it adds up. Second the chime uses a lot more power and because the chime is mechanical it has parts that wear out and it is more expensive to make.

So they then started putting in electronic doorbell systems. These use a lot less power. SO much less power that the chime will trigger when a video doorbell is connected because even thought the doorbell only allows a small amount of current to flow, it is enough to trigger the doorbell chime.

My recommendation is you first start by taking apart your chime and making positively sure that it is indeed electromechanical with the solenoids. Then next you find the doorbell transformer and make sure it's supplying 24vac. NOT dc!!! AC. Fix those 2 things and the doorbell will probably start working.
Exactly. My door bell is old school with solenoids as I described. It is electromechanical. If people would just read...

I bought a new 24VAC transformer, installed it and read 27 VAC at the button and the chime so it's not the voltage.

Last edited by cee3peeoh; 12-30-2018 at 12:16 PM.
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