Should I Worry About Voltage Drop For This Circuit? - Electrical - DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum
Advertisement


Go Back   DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum > Home Improvement > Electrical

CLICK HERE AND JOIN OUR COMMUNITY TODAY...IT'S FREE!

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Display Modes
Old 05-06-2012, 08:09 AM   #1
Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Wisconsin
Posts: 235
Rewards Points: 162
Default

Should I worry about voltage drop for this circuit?


I'm looking at installing a 15A circuit from my house down to my pier by the lake. The total run is looking to be about 125'. Planned on using 12-2 UF.

I'm not planning on running any heavy loads on this circuit - the shop vac for cleaning the boat will probably be the biggest load. Will voltage drop create an issue for this length?

Thanks
__________________
Some advice you receive on the internet can be worth exactly what you paid for it - be careful.
stubborn1 is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Old 05-06-2012, 08:47 AM   #2
A "Handy Husband"
 
rjniles's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: South Carolina Low Country
Posts: 11,185
Rewards Points: 882
Default


Based on your load you are good.

Use a GFCI receptacle rated weatherproof and an in service cover.
__________________
My electrical answers are based on 2017 NEC, you may have local amendments.

Location: Coastal South Carolina
rjniles is online now   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Old 05-06-2012, 10:44 AM   #3
Licensed Electrical Cont.
 
Speedy Petey's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: NY State
Posts: 7,828
Rewards Points: 2,006
Default


Well, using #12 for a 15A circuit you are already oversizing the wire.
Thing is, voltage drop @ 120v is much more sever than at higher voltages.

A shop vac is no small craw, especially a larger one. A 10A load @ 120V @ 125' recommends #10 wire. If the vac is medium to smaller, like 6-8A, then the #12 should be fine. You also have to remember, cheaper motors like a shop vac will run fine on lower voltages, like 105-110V. Even then the worst that will happen is you'll shorten the life of the motor. If the only heavier draws will be the likes of the vac I'd say the #12 is fine.
__________________
Sometimes I feel like if I answer any more questions it is like someone trying to climb over a fence to jump off a bridge and me giving them a boost.
Speedy Petey is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Old 05-06-2012, 11:12 AM   #4
E2 Electrician
 
stickboy1375's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: Litchfield, CT
Posts: 5,655
Rewards Points: 2,970
Default


I agree with the others, #12 AWG, 125' run with a 10amp load will yield a 5% voltage drop, but that is well within limits of your application.
stickboy1375 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-06-2012, 11:41 AM   #5
Member
 
J. V.'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Posts: 4,244
Rewards Points: 578
Default


If you are digging a trench, I highly recommend you do something more. It is silly to dig a 125' trench for a 12/2 UF cable. JMHO.
J. V. is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to J. V. For This Useful Post:
Speedy Petey (05-06-2012)
Old 05-06-2012, 12:46 PM   #6
Member
 
kevinp22's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: Saint Louis, MO
Posts: 328
Rewards Points: 260
Default


i agree with JV but im mister overkill.

but think about future applications - and to do it all over again.

if it were me i would do a 20A circuit and run #10 wire or even a MWBC and give yourself 2 20A circuits.
kevinp22 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-07-2012, 10:03 AM   #7
Electrical Contractor
 
rrolleston's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Location: Granville, NY
Posts: 1,994
Rewards Points: 1,014
Send a message via AIM to rrolleston Send a message via Yahoo to rrolleston
Default


As inexpensive as conduit is now days it's nice to lay down a larger size than you need and have the option to upgrade later or pull new conductors if something happens to them without digging.
__________________
With Electricity there is the right way to do it and the dead way. Just because it works does not make it safe.
rrolleston is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-07-2012, 11:06 AM   #8
Member
 
J. V.'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Posts: 4,244
Rewards Points: 578
Default


Quote:
Originally Posted by rrolleston View Post
As inexpensive as conduit is now days it's nice to lay down a larger size than you need and have the option to upgrade later or pull new conductors if something happens to them without digging.
This is exactly what I meant. I would run more than one conduit also. Even if you just stubbed them up. Just my two cents.
J. V. is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
efficiency voltage drop wire gauge jackwashere Electrical 6 02-18-2012 08:33 PM
household voltage drop pilottcs Electrical 3 12-10-2011 07:11 PM
Flickering lights on circuit with low voltage and line voltage bulbs davidwiesel Electrical 4 04-18-2011 08:54 AM
Will splice cause voltage drop? JPsAlias Electrical 6 05-19-2008 07:09 PM
Voltage Drop Manuel6 Electrical 1 01-16-2007 05:20 PM




Top of Page | View New Posts