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Old 12-31-2011, 09:59 PM   #1
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Series or parallel?


When running outlets on a circuit do I need to pigtail at each box or can I run the "in" to the top screws and the "out" to the bottom screws and Just continue on to the next box? Thanks, 1
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Old 12-31-2011, 10:02 PM   #2
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Either way, and it is parrallel in either case.
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Old 12-31-2011, 10:02 PM   #3
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You can do either, except for the grounding conductors or if a multiwire branch circuit is involved.
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Old 12-31-2011, 10:02 PM   #4
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You can daisy-chain through each outlet as you describe, as long as it's not a multiwire branch circuit (Two circuits sharing a single neutral wire). You'll still need to pigtail the grounds, since you can't land two ground wires on the single ground screw.

Some people prefer to always pigtail the wires for receptacles, but it's just a matter of personal preference.

Edit: Wow, I guess we're all on the same frequency tonight...
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Old 12-31-2011, 10:06 PM   #5
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You guys don't have anything else to do either?
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Old 12-31-2011, 10:14 PM   #6
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Old 12-31-2011, 10:30 PM   #7
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Either way, and it is parrallel in either case.
Wouldn't household wiring branch circuits, actually be a Series-Parallel set of circuits, if you really broke it down.



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Old 12-31-2011, 10:36 PM   #8
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If the incoming and continuing hot wires are wire nutted directly to each other (with a pigtail to the switch or receptacle as applicable) then the corresponding neutrals must be similarly wire nutted directly to each other.

A switch is connected in series with the light or other "thing" it controls. (Feed hot wire to switch, other terminal of switch to light fixture, other terminal of light fixture to neutral of feed cable)

Receptacles and different light fixtures are never wired in series (power to gold terminal of one receptacle, silver terminal of first receptacle to gold terminal of second, silver terminal of second receptacle to gold terminal of third receptacle etc. then silver of last receptacle to neutral) except perhaps within some specialized portable laboratory test jigs.
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Old 01-01-2012, 08:49 AM   #9
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Maybe you sparkies should explain a true series circuit, so someone doesn't get the idea they really want one. Remember the old strings of Christmas lights that if one bulb burned out, the string was dead until you located and replaced the bad bulb? Now.........
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Old 01-01-2012, 08:56 AM   #10
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It is just as bad as those strings, that a bulb burns out, and half the string is dead. PITA.



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Old 01-01-2012, 05:30 PM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by joasis View Post
Maybe you sparkies should explain a true series circuit, so someone doesn't get the idea they really want one. Remember the old strings of Christmas lights that if one bulb burned out, the string was dead until you located and replaced the bad bulb? Now.........
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It is just as bad as those strings, that a bulb burns out, and half the string is dead. PITA.
It was the same way I did dealt with old street luminaires with old school indenscnet bulbs and old school MV bulbs there were wired in series!! and to compound the issue is the voltage level on old school street luminares are insane high which most guys will say holy crap the last one I did dealt one city it have 120 MV bulbs from single source which it was 2400 volts !!!

so to find a bad bulbs was pain in butt but have to use the POCO grade high voltage tester to find the bad one ( it was cheaper and quicker for me to just replace all of them and be done with it.) then short time later it was converted to conventail HPS and got rid of the mess we have in that city.

Now only place I know still carry the true series luminaires is airport runaway luminaires and they have special shunt transfomer to run the luminaires so if one go out other stay on as far for the voltage itself that will varies a bit depending on the runway layout.

Merci,
Marc
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Old 01-01-2012, 05:37 PM   #12
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Quote:
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Either way, and it is parrallel in either case.
Wouldnt using the screws on the plug make it a series?
Removing 1 of the screws would kill it past that point making it a series circuit,that being said i prefer to tail the wires in each box before plug maling it a parallel circuit.
unless my thinking has been wrong all these years
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Old 01-01-2012, 08:25 PM   #13
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If you insist the metal strip on the side of the receptacle with the two screws is in series with the incoming wire and the continuing wire. And the various segments of wire daisy chaining from one receptacle to the next form a series circuit from the panel to the last receptacle on the line with one thing plugged in out there.

But we don't use the words series and parallel when we are talking about just the individual pieces of wire. Only when talking about the loads (lights, etc.) and controlling devices (switches, etc.).

The various things plugged into the daisy chained receptacles are not (had better not be) in series with each other.

Old fashioned streetlights connected in series often had a pair of fins at each location with a special disk (about a half inch in diameter) in between. The disk burned through and "shorted" when the lamp at that location burned out, keeping the rest of the lights on. Usually the fins were part of the lamp socket and the lamp and socket were extracted together and the lamp and disk replaced. (The socket assembly was usually held in since the parts were springy and was yanked out in a manner similar to many mini Christmas bulbs)

Series streetlighting allowed for thinner wires compared with parallel, although the insulation and insulators had to be rated for the higher voltage. In the heyday of incandescent streetlights and the start of the mercury vapor revolution a common voltage was 2400, taken from a 4160 volt 3 phase distribution system. One fairly thin (probably #8 minimum size to withstand snow) wire attached to the 2400 volt primary at one end of the street, daisy chained from one streetlight to the next, and was connected to ground at the other end of the street. This was a switched circuit with a photocontrol somewhere in it. Sometimes there was a regulator the kept the current (in amperes) somewhat constant and this actually prevented lamp burnouts from raising the voltage on the remaining lights and burning those out more quickly.
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Last edited by AllanJ; 01-01-2012 at 08:52 PM.
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Old 01-01-2012, 08:36 PM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AllanJ View Post
If you insist the metal strip on the side of the receptacle with the two screws is in series with the incoming wire and the continuing wire. And the various segments of wire daisy chaining from one receptacle to the next form a series circuit from the panel to the last receptacle on the line with one thing plugged in out there.

But the various things plugged into the daisy chained receptacles are not (had better not be) in series with each other.
Well would that not be the definition of a series circuit?
god knows ive replaced enough plugs over the years that were back fed or joined at the jumpers on side killing all the plugs downstream when one burned up.
In omaha theyve made you tail out all wires before the plugs as long as i can remember for this very reason
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Old 01-01-2012, 09:20 PM   #15
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Quote:
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Well would that not be the definition of a series circuit?
god knows ive replaced enough plugs over the years that were back fed or joined at the jumpers on side killing all the plugs downstream when one burned up.
In omaha theyve made you tail out all wires before the plugs as long as i can remember for this very reason
Actually a Series circuit would be the example of a Switch Leg for a light, not a outlet in the middle of a run, that is pigtailed, or being used as a pass through.



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