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Old 07-09-2010, 11:24 AM   #1
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Recesssed lighting


I am installing 4 recessed lights and 1 dimmer switch. Can I use 14-3 wire from the breaker to the dimmer switch and then from the dimmer switch to the lights?

Last edited by sunnyaz64; 07-09-2010 at 11:26 AM. Reason: grammer
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Old 07-09-2010, 11:45 AM   #2
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1. What is the wattage of each light?
2. What is the amp rating on the breaker?
3. Is there anything else tied to the breaker?
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Old 07-09-2010, 11:45 AM   #3
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Why not just 14-2 wire ?
14-2 = hot, neutral & ground
14-3 = 2 hots - red & black, neutral & ground



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Old 07-09-2010, 11:49 AM   #4
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The first thing you need to do is to verify the rating of the existing breaker or fuse for that circuit. #14 can be used on 15 amp rated circuits.
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Old 07-09-2010, 01:10 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DownRiverGuy View Post
1. What is the wattage of each light?
2. What is the amp rating on the breaker?
3. Is there anything else tied to the breaker?
Don't know the wattage of the lights - doing the wire for my sister - but will find out.

The breaker is 20 amp. This will be a dedicated circuit. Each light is 75 watts.

Last edited by sunnyaz64; 07-09-2010 at 01:25 PM.
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Old 07-09-2010, 01:13 PM   #6
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You cannot use #14 wire with a 20A Breaker. You must either use #12 or swap out the 20A Breaker with a 15A Breaker.

When you say 14-3 are you refering to a hot, neutral, and ground? Or as Scuba asked.... hot, hot, neutral, ground?
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Old 07-09-2010, 01:17 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jim Port View Post
The first thing you need to do is to verify the rating of the existing breaker or fuse for that circuit. #14 can be used on 15 amp rated circuits.
The breaker is 20 amp. I was reading that someone used 14-2 wire from breaker to switch and 1st light then used 14-3 wire to connect the rest of the lights. I would like to use 14-2 or 14-3 wire all the way through but don't know which one. This circuit will bee dedicated to the recessed lights only.
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Old 07-09-2010, 01:28 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DownRiverGuy View Post
You cannot use #14 wire with a 20A Breaker. You must either use #12 or swap out the 20A Breaker with a 15A Breaker.

When you say 14-3 are you refering to a hot, neutral, and ground? Or as Scuba asked.... hot, hot, neutral, ground?
Thank you for the breaker info.

the wire is hot, hot, neutral, ground.
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Old 07-09-2010, 01:29 PM   #9
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You CANNOT use #14 on ANY part of a 20A Circuit. (I see you replied to that comment already)

The breaker is rated to protect #12 wire... a #14 wire has the potential to burn up when more than 15A flow thru it.

I am confused by why you would use 14-2 to the switch and 14-3 to the lights.... why do you need 2 hots once you go out of the switch? I need more information or you need to ask more questions on this install

As scuba said...
14-2 = 1 hot, 1 neutral, 1 ground
14-3 = 2 hots, 1 neutral, 1 ground

Why do you need the additional hot once you go past the switch?

Last edited by DownRiverGuy; 07-09-2010 at 01:29 PM. Reason: OP responded to comment prior
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Old 07-09-2010, 01:35 PM   #10
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There is no reason that 4 recessed lights would require a 20 amp circuit with #12 wire. A fifteen amp circuit is more than enough and you will find the #14 easier to work with.
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Old 07-09-2010, 03:06 PM   #11
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Quote:
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There is no reason that 4 recessed lights would require a 20 amp circuit with #12 wire. A fifteen amp circuit is more than enough and you will find the #14 easier to work with.
If I use a 15A breaker and 14-2 wire to install 4 75 watt recessed lights and 1 dimmer switch, will that be okay. The wire will be a brand new line with nothing else on it.
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Old 07-09-2010, 03:13 PM   #12
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Four 75 watt bulbs would give you a total load of 300 watts on a circuit that can safely handle 1800 watts. If the load were to be longer than 3 hours the load would be 1440. Either way you have a great safety margin.
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