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Old 02-13-2010, 11:04 PM   #16
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Here's another example that might help explain things.

One of these home improvement shows had a situation where the POCO feeder to the house needed to be moved. Because we're talking about the feeder BEFORE the breaker box, and even BEFORE the meter, that ment the electrician was going to have to work with the hot wires (after all, we can't inconvenience the whole neighborhood and ask them to let the power to everyone get cut off now can we).

So as a part of this show, they show the electrician taking a large set of pliers and simply cut through a live wire with no apparent protection. However, they go on to discuss the fact that the electrician is standing on a fiberglass ladder and is careful to touch nothing but the ladder and the live wire.

Because of the equation V=IR (expressed in the form of I=V/R), if the resistance is infinite, the current is zero. Well the resistance of a fiberglass ladder (practically speaking) is infinite. That ment there was zero current flowing through the ladder. Since there was no other path to ground but through the ladder, no current was flowing through the electrician.

If that all makes sense, you will understand the phrase that voltage doesn't kill you, amps do.
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Old 02-16-2010, 11:18 PM   #17
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I'd like to point out that one should get in the habit of connecting grounds first then neutrals and finally hots, regardless if its hot or not so that you develop good habits and this can not happen.

I'd also like to point out that getting zapped from a neutral in mentioned case you become a electrical device and now have a series circuit. If you will remember in a series circuit amperage stays the same and voltage drops across the loads. Meaning you would take quite a hit.
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Old 02-17-2010, 07:26 AM   #18
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HooKooDooKu View Post
Here's another example that might help explain things.

One of these home improvement shows had a situation where the POCO feeder to the house needed to be moved. Because we're talking about the feeder BEFORE the breaker box, and even BEFORE the meter, that ment the electrician was going to have to work with the hot wires (after all, we can't inconvenience the whole neighborhood and ask them to let the power to everyone get cut off now can we).

So as a part of this show, they show the electrician taking a large set of pliers and simply cut through a live wire with no apparent protection. However, they go on to discuss the fact that the electrician is standing on a fiberglass ladder and is careful to touch nothing but the ladder and the live wire.
NO, that means the POCO would be required to disconnect power at the pole before the work is done
There isn't ANY electrician around here that would work on wires before disconnect by the POCO
Possibly in some remote areas they may do this
But don't confuse a STUNT for a TV show as proper work procedure



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Old 02-17-2010, 08:14 AM   #19
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Originally Posted by Scuba_Dave View Post
NO, that means the POCO would be required to disconnect power at the pole before the work is done
There isn't ANY electrician around here that would work on wires before disconnect by the POCO
Possibly in some remote areas they may do this
But don't confuse a STUNT for a TV show as proper work procedure
As risky (a.k.a. stupid?) it is, apparently there are some electricians that will work on unprotected hot wires.

But with just a little Googling, I found a discussion about the episode I had seen.

http://advice.thisoldhouse.com/showthread.php?t=15897

You'll see that several people were taking TOH to task for what was done... but it was done.

I don't disagree with any of the poster that talk about how dangerous, foolish, and in some places even illegal to do what was done on the show. I only brought it up to help explain how electricity works.
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