Problem W/ Two 240v Baseboard Circuits On Single Double-pole Switch. - Electrical - Page 2 - DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum
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Old 03-21-2010, 10:00 AM   #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AllanJ View Post
According to the OP, the wiring in the box (whites marretted aka wire nutted), the circuits were originally wired for one double pole thermostat with both poles thermostatically controlled (like mine).


Actually. According to the OP, he doesn't know how his original stat was wired. Cause his F.I.L. swapped out the original stat while he wasn't there.
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Old 03-21-2010, 12:50 PM   #17
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Even though I don't know exactly how the original tstat was wired, it definitely controlled both circuits, as I'd thrown the breakers before when doing other work, and they worked as expected (one turned off two heaters, one the other).

Heaters are 1200watts, so the 20amp is certainly overkill for the single heater circuit, but everything I have is wired minimum 12 guage, there's no 14 guage on the entire property (that I've seen).

The fact that it originally worked, and that both breakers were active, means it can't possible have been wired with a single pole thermostat, as that would only have allowed a single line circuit to be controlled. So possible that it was wired to all three loads, but then of course that wouldn't explain both breakers being active.

What's still confusing to me is how the new tstat (which is electro-mechanical) is actually operating.

One poster says that he had a double pole thermostat with both poles being slightly off on setting. I could see that with a mechanical spring bimetal switch, with two fully separate switches controlled with the same knob. This is battery powered, two 'halves' of the switch (front with the knob and two batteries, and back the connects to the power leads) both have PCB's, and there's only a 3-conductor connecter between the two, so the front half cannot be acting as the full double pole switch. I suspect that perhaps the back half is basically a double-pole contactor controlled by the front half. Still can't figure out how turning the unit (front half) on/off connects the second load...

When my wife is back in town (call me paranoid, but I don't like working on 240v without someone else around, 120v I'll play with all day long but I respect 240) I'll pull everything apart and see what exactly is what with the lines, and I'll also play with the switch and my meter and see exactly how it operates between all 4 leads, in the 3 modes (full off, turned on but no heat ask, and on but no heat ask), as I clearly see THREE distinct behaviors, not just two (ie. full off, and turn on but no heat ask operate differently (one load is turned on), then when heat ask the other load turns on. Thus I wonder if somehow the two halves aren't fully independent. It can't be cross-connection on the line in side, as that wouldn't explain how the two breakers control the loads.
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Old 03-21-2010, 01:23 PM   #18
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I believe you have it wired correct.
Put a continuity tester on the stat leads and turn it up and down. Then turn it off from the switch.

You could try swapping the two line and load connections and see if the other unit comes on. I'm still thinking the stat only switches one line, but the switch switches both.
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Old 03-21-2010, 04:16 PM   #19
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More then one single pole thermostat has been controlling heaters that are fed by 2 breakers.
Its very easy to do.
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