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Old 01-08-2012, 06:49 PM   #1
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Prints for Residential Electrical load center + more


Hey!

I am electrician but mainly familiar with the heavy industrial setting.

My new home has no ground connection on all outlets. I assume that I have to run new wires to them since there is probably no ground wire going to these outlets, correct?

Also the home has no GFIs at all. I am planning on redoing most of the electrical system including the load center.

I'd like to get an understanding of how many devices will need to fit into the load center. Older homes only have a few circuit breakers and I know that these days there are a lot of breakers in panels.

In addition I will install solar panels on my roof which will require some more room in the panel.

Are there any prints available showing a modern, up to date, and up to code residential electrical system of a whole home?

In case this is of any relevance, I live in California.

Thanks!
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Old 01-08-2012, 06:55 PM   #2
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You could start with Article 210 to see the required circuits. Bathrooms require a 20 amp receptacle circuit. The kitchen requires a minimum of 2 20 amp circuits plus any for hardwired appliances, the laundry will require a 20 amp. Then you have your lighting circuit etc.
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Old 01-08-2012, 07:02 PM   #3
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This site might help too:
http://www.nojolt.com/residential_el...in_guide.shtml
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Old 01-10-2012, 07:27 AM   #4
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This is great stuff, thanks to both of you!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jim Port View Post
You could start with Article 210 to see the required circuits.
I found many documents with excerpts from Article 210. Can it be found online in full (for free)?


Also, would someone still have sample prints, preferably showing electrical system a complete home?
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Old 01-10-2012, 07:48 AM   #5
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There is a series of books called "CodeCheck." They aren't very expensive. I bought several of them when my wife and I were building our house by ourselves, and they proved invaluable.
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Old 01-10-2012, 07:54 AM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jaxx View Post
I found many documents with excerpts from Article 210. Can it be found online in full (for free)?
As an electrician, industrial or otherwise (see post #1), you should have a copy of the version of the NEC that is current in your area.


Quote:
...sample prints, preferably showing electrical system a complete home?
Not a complete home... but most of the common stuff:
http://www.licensedelectrician.com/S...Electrical.htm
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Old 01-10-2012, 08:26 AM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jaxx View Post
Also, would someone still have sample prints, preferably showing electrical system a complete home?
Go to google.com
Click on Images

Then search for the following words...
house electrical plan


Electrical symbols in plans...
http://www.archblocks.com/archblocks...ibrary-preview
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Old 01-10-2012, 09:52 AM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jaxx View Post
I found many documents with excerpts from Article 210. Can it be found online in full (for free)?
California has all of their codes viewable online for free:
http://www.bsc.ca.gov/codes.aspx

Unfortunately, the electric code isn't searchable. You can only jump to the beginnings of articles. But it beats running down to the permit office if you don't have your own codebook.
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Old 01-10-2012, 11:04 AM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jaxx View Post
Hey!

I am electrician but mainly familiar with the heavy industrial setting.

My new home has no ground connection on all outlets. I assume that I have to run new wires to them since there is probably no ground wire going to these outlets, correct?

Also the home has no GFIs at all. I am planning on redoing most of the electrical system including the load center.

I'd like to get an understanding of how many devices will need to fit into the load center. Older homes only have a few circuit breakers and I know that these days there are a lot of breakers in panels.

In addition I will install solar panels on my roof which will require some more room in the panel.

Are there any prints available showing a modern, up to date, and up to code residential electrical system of a whole home?

In case this is of any relevance, I live in California.

Thanks!
I'm not quite understanding why you would not be in possession of the NEC but putting that aside .. yes it is viewable on line... free ... last I checked. Problem is there is no easy answer to your question. Being an electrician our sister site will welcome your questions as it is professional licensed electricians and here we are both DIY and electricians and miscellaneous ...

It would appear to me though that your looking for free information and I can't blame you for that but only so much is free. You may have to go to the skilled trades bookstore in your jurisdiction and spend a few dollars for the correct codes references for your area.

There simply is no way we can tell you how to wire a house in one easy lesson ... There are many books written on wiring homes I suggest you purchase one, it will be well worth the investment.
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Old 01-11-2012, 11:13 PM   #10
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Thank you for your responses.

I do not have the 2011 version but the 2008 one. Thought it would be better to use the most recent one to obtain this information.
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Old 01-12-2012, 12:32 AM   #11
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Are you also planning on redoing the wiring for the lighting? If so, I suggest talking a gander at California's Energy Code. You may be required to jump through a few hoops to meet it. For example the gal issuing permits at the local office mentioned that all non-high efficiency lights (fluorescent/led) might be required to have motion sensors or dimmers. However, it seems there's still confusion in my local permit office as to how the energy code should apply to upgrades. So you might not need to worry about this.
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Old 01-12-2012, 07:07 AM   #12
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The California energy code is Title 24 IIRC.

Try this link to the NEC.

http://www.nfpa.org/aboutthecodes/Ab...&cookie_test=1
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