Power To A Sub Panel - Electrical - DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum
Advertisement


Go Back   DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum > Home Improvement > Electrical

CLICK HERE AND JOIN OUR COMMUNITY TODAY...IT'S FREE!

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Display Modes
Old 08-03-2010, 11:26 AM   #1
Newbie
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Posts: 1
Rewards Points: 10
Default

power to a sub panel


I recently installed a new 200 amp service in my house. I have a 100 amp panel in excellent shape I would like to install in my shop located about 250' away and have a roll of direct burial #3AWG wire to connect the two. If all this sounds good so far, the plan is to install a 50amp 2 pole breaker(SquareD) in the 200 amp box to power the panel in the shop. What is the best way to make the connection between the 50 amp breaker and the #3 wire ?
BigHill is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Old 08-03-2010, 11:49 AM   #2
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: South of Boston, MA
Posts: 17,248
Rewards Points: 2,000
Default


The breaker should list the Max wire size that can be connected
I thought a 50a could take up to #2 wire



Scuba_Dave is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Old 08-03-2010, 11:59 AM   #3
Electrician
 
Proby's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: NJ
Posts: 818
Rewards Points: 500
Default


You can buy the reducer pictured below from just about anywhere, Home Depot has a pair of them in a bag for about $5. While you're there, pick up a couple feet of #8 THHN to serve as pigtails from the breaker to the reducer.

How many wires in your direct burial cable?

You'll need to drive a ground rod at your shop.
Attached Images
 
__________________
Anything fun is either illegal, immoral, or fattening.
Proby is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Old 08-03-2010, 12:04 PM   #4
Licensed electrician
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Maryland
Posts: 12,407
Rewards Points: 3,658
Default


Is your cable 3 or 4 conductor? A 4 wire feeder is required under the 08 Code.
__________________
Answers based on the National Electrical Code. Local amendments may apply. Check with your local building officials.
Jim Port is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 08-03-2010, 12:12 PM   #5
Electrician
 
Proby's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: NJ
Posts: 818
Rewards Points: 500
Default


Quote:
Originally Posted by Jim Port View Post
Is your cable 3 or 4 conductor? A 4 wire feeder is required under the 08 Code.
I know you need separate neutral and grounds, but could you use a 3-wire to run a single hot out to the separate structure? I never looked into it because I would probably never do it. But in the case of the OP in which he has the wire already, it might be cost effective.
__________________
Anything fun is either illegal, immoral, or fattening.
Proby is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-03-2010, 12:19 PM   #6
Just call me Andrew
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Albany, NY
Posts: 2,271
Rewards Points: 1,032
Default


Quote:
Originally Posted by Proby View Post
I know you need separate neutral and grounds, but could you use a 3-wire to run a single hot out to the separate structure? I never looked into it because I would probably never do it. But in the case of the OP in which he has the wire already, it might be cost effective.
Even if up to code, wouldn't that only give him 120v in the workshop? Good chance his shop will require some 220v tools.
__________________
Andrew

secutanudu is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-03-2010, 01:27 PM   #7
Licensed electrician
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Maryland
Posts: 12,407
Rewards Points: 3,658
Default


I guess you could run a 3 wire feed to a outbuilding panel if you only expected 120 volt loads. Half the breaker slots would be unavailable for use. IMO I would not run less than a 4 wire feeder, even if only a small one.
__________________
Answers based on the National Electrical Code. Local amendments may apply. Check with your local building officials.
Jim Port is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 08-03-2010, 01:36 PM   #8
Electrician
 
Proby's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: NJ
Posts: 818
Rewards Points: 500
Default


Quote:
Originally Posted by Jim Port View Post
Half the breaker slots would be unavailable for use.
I've found sub-panels in houses that were only fed with one leg, they jumped the buses together so the whole panel was hot.

Oddly enough, I couldn't find anything saying this was against code. I believe I asked on Mike Holt's forum and no one else found anything either.
__________________
Anything fun is either illegal, immoral, or fattening.
Proby is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Reply


Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Multiple Panel Question theatretch85 Electrical 7 09-29-2016 07:15 PM
Running power to small barn in VA from home service 350' ribertgropius Electrical 9 06-12-2010 02:18 AM
Power Save Device capt2 Electrical 52 02-24-2010 06:42 PM
Sub Panel SoxFan Electrical 2 12-02-2008 10:16 AM
Melted Service Entrance Wire in Panel theatretch85 Electrical 13 08-22-2008 10:37 AM




Top of Page | View New Posts