Pot Lights For Insulated Ceilings - Electrical - DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum
Advertisement


Go Back   DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum > Home Improvement > Electrical

CLICK HERE AND JOIN OUR COMMUNITY TODAY...IT'S FREE!

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Display Modes
Old 04-19-2010, 03:45 PM   #1
long island, NY
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: long island, ny
Posts: 382
Rewards Points: 250
Default

pot lights for insulated ceilings


how do you tell if a pot light (already in the home) is safe for contact w/ insulation?

Another novice DIY'er confession

my husband just added insulation in the attic. We forgot to double check ahead of time whether the pot lights are safe for insulation contact. a few days later, I'm smacking myself in the head.

As this room is FAR FAR away from the attic entrance, I'm praying there's a way to determine whether the lights are ok from the room below, rather than the attic. If they are not, is there a quick way to uninstall them, cut the insulation, and re-install them? Or would it be likely easier to crawl into the attic and try to find all of them?

thanks for your help

oh, is there anything else that is electrical up there that we should have avoided? there are 1 or 2 ceiling light fixtures on the 2nd floor (chandelier) that obviously have boxes somewhere up there..... are the backs of the boxes ok to cover with insulation? are there any other obvious attic electrical hazards?

sigh. So stupid to not think of this sooner....... thanks.

Last edited by diy'er on LI; 04-19-2010 at 03:56 PM. Reason: thought of another question.....
diy'er on LI is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Old 04-19-2010, 04:01 PM   #2
Electrical Contractor
 
jbfan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: Newnan GA
Posts: 8,168
Rewards Points: 980
Default


Remove the light trim and look inside the can for the number.
If it is a halo can, it will have the model # and end with ic if it is rated for insullation, or it will not have ic and must have the clerance around the light.
If these are new constuction cans, you will have to climb back into the attice to cut out around the lights.
Everything else is fine.
__________________
Yes I am a pirate, two hundred years too late
The cannons don't thunder, there's nothing to plunder
I'm an over-forty victim of fate.
jbfan is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Old 04-19-2010, 04:06 PM   #3
long island, NY
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: long island, ny
Posts: 382
Rewards Points: 250
Default


thanks. I will definitely do that when I go home. Man, my fingers and toes are crossed.... I pray I don't have to crawl all the way back there! argh......

As for question #2, is there anything else electrical up there that we should have avoided like the plague, but may have inadvertedly insulated too close to? such as the electrical boxes for the chandelier, or some connection in the HVAC system?

The only thing worse than having to go up there again, is having to go back up there multiple times!

thanks......
diy'er on LI is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Old 04-19-2010, 04:07 PM   #4
Electrical Contractor
 
jbfan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: Newnan GA
Posts: 8,168
Rewards Points: 980
Default


Everything else is fine.

I only use halo cans, so I'm not sure my info will help with another brand.

Try installing those cans, and forget to take a tool with you!
__________________
Yes I am a pirate, two hundred years too late
The cannons don't thunder, there's nothing to plunder
I'm an over-forty victim of fate.
jbfan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-19-2010, 04:11 PM   #5
long island, NY
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: long island, ny
Posts: 382
Rewards Points: 250
Default


awesome. thanks so much for your responses.... It really makes me feel better.

What on earth would I do without this site?!

I simply had this thought too late and have been in a DIY'er panic for about 30 minutes . I knew well enough to tell my husband to make sure he didn't insulate too close to the eaves, but it simply lapsed from my mind to mention the can lights.

Well, it could have been much worse. There could have been a myriad of additional items.

thanks again
diy'er on LI is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-20-2010, 11:17 AM   #6
long island, NY
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: long island, ny
Posts: 382
Rewards Points: 250
Default


OK, I finally figured it out. our current fixtures are made by commercial electric (obviously a HD special!) and are, of course, NOT IC can lights. blah.

My husband would prefer to replace the lights rather than cut the insulation, since that would compromise the energy efficinecy of his recent insulation job.

So, I intend to shut of the breaker, pop out the current lights, and replace them with recessed lights (that don't attach to joists) of the same diameter. I'm fairly certain the current lights also are not attached to beams becuase they were added to a pre-existing ceiling.

You mentioned you only use halo products. Why? Is there anything else I should look out for when purchasing IC lights?

thanks......
diy'er on LI is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-20-2010, 01:09 PM   #7
Electrical Contractor
 
jbfan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: Newnan GA
Posts: 8,168
Rewards Points: 980
Default


The only reason I use halo, is the supply house I use carries them.

The trim you choose will affect the size of lamp you can use.
__________________
Yes I am a pirate, two hundred years too late
The cannons don't thunder, there's nothing to plunder
I'm an over-forty victim of fate.
jbfan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-26-2010, 12:14 PM   #8
long island, NY
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: long island, ny
Posts: 382
Rewards Points: 250
Default


It's DONE!

I replaced the cans with halo IC cans for remodeling. It was super-easy to do, especially since the can-to-can wiring was already in place. We did 3 cans in under an hour.

one really creepy note:
The original cans (installed when a contractor built our legal accessory apartment in 2002) were pressed directly against the original attic insulation, and were NOT IC rated. While the 2 kitchen cans did not damage the neighboring insulation, the insulation around the bathroom can light was black and melted. Holy [email protected], we were on the verge of a fire!

This aggravates me. We obviously had all building permits in place, and the town inspected all of the electrical work as it was being done.

I'm really glad this problem is now gone for good.
thanks for your help!
diy'er on LI is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-26-2010, 02:00 PM   #9
Electrical Contractor
 
jbfan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: Newnan GA
Posts: 8,168
Rewards Points: 980
Default


Great. Glad to help anytime.
__________________
Yes I am a pirate, two hundred years too late
The cannons don't thunder, there's nothing to plunder
I'm an over-forty victim of fate.
jbfan is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Reply


Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Finding underground electric wire for driveway lights. mitch21131 Electrical 25 09-24-2012 08:52 AM
How Many Recessed Lights SHould I use? jonathan03 Electrical 0 03-14-2010 11:03 PM
Changing switch for lights in basement, confused on current wiring. RyanD Electrical 2 05-14-2009 08:37 PM
Adding can lights to an existing circuit TexasEd Electrical 1 06-17-2008 07:23 PM
Wiring lights on vaulted ceilings Unregistered Electrical 4 01-31-2008 09:39 PM




Top of Page | View New Posts